Posts Tagged ‘American Laundromat Records’

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The early ‘90s were very good to Juliana Hatfield. In the first half of that decade, she contributed to the best album by her former band Blake Babies, released two fantastic solo albums and one with a new project, The Juliana Hatfield Three, and played bass on The Lemonheads’ greatest achievement “It’s A Shame About Ray”. It’s a period of Hatfield’s career ripe for rediscovery, even as she continues to release fine new music currently.

Juliana Hatfield’s debut album Hey Babe. Filled with effortless melodies and catchy guitar riffs. Hatfield’s intelligent, hook-laden songs shine here in here exceptional debut.

A great first step is to listen to this new vinyl edition of her 1992 solo debut, Hey Babe. The album belies its heartbroken, self-reflective songs through Hatfield’s chirpy delivery of her lyrics and the urgent grind of its guitar rock (with help from members of Bullet Lavolta and fIREHOSE). All of that is rendered with sharp definition on this new pressing of the LP. This music needs clarity like this to let every shard of Hatfield’s broken heart stick in the listener’s skin while the music surges and blooms around the room.

It’s release from 1992 was the inaugural year of the “women in rock” era: a stretch of several years when artists from Courtney Love and PJ Harvey to Meredith Brooks unwittingly formed a cohort of so-called girls with guitars and the phrase “girl power” seeped into the popular lexicon from the underground precincts of the riot grrrl scene.

Juliana Hatfield was at the heart of this zeitgeist. In 1992, Hatfield had just broken up her college band Blake Babies and released her solo debut Hey Babe on Mammoth Records. Hey Babe was among the most successful independent releases of the year; 25 years on, it remains a largely forgotten minor masterpiece. Hey Babe offers a landscape of emotion – self-disgust, second-guessing, depression, cautious optimism – that has no place in a reception model so narrowly hinged on “empowerment”. The album dwells on muddled feelings, elevating confusion and insecurity over anger. Its 11 songs build entire worlds out of the state of feeling small, delivered in a voice that skids from girlish wail to shattered mumble. The album’s centrepiece is the song Ugly, an acoustic instruction manual on living with low self-esteem. “I’m pretty lost but I don’t want to be found/ My tiny screams don’t make a sound,” sings Hatfield.

Hatfield herself stopped playing its songs shortly after it was released. “Immediately after recording the album, I was really embarrassed by it,” she explained , “but now I’m really proud of myself.” Hey Babe will strike a chord with a new generation of listeners who are shy, ambivalent, inward and emotionally complex.

Sean Glonek at SRG Studios newly master from the original 1/4″ analog tapes. The artwork has been recreated from the original LP art but with a little twist thanks to the skill and creativity of award-winning designer, Aaron Tanner of Melodic Virtue. This exclusive limited-edition pressing, in a single-pocket gatefold jacket, was pressed by hand at Burlington Record Plant in Burlington, VT.

“Hey Babe” was produced by Gary Smith (Pixies, Throwing Muses, Blake Babies), and was originally released on Mammoth Records back in 1992. The album featured a bevy of guest players, including Mike Watt, Evan Dando, John Wesley Harding, Clay Tarver, Chick Graning, and Todd Philips.

This special 25th Anniversary Reissue is produced and distributed by American Laundromat Records, Inc. under license from Mammoth Records. .

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Undiscovered Planet – A Short Film by David Doobinin (with Juliana Hatfield) Shot, Directed and Edited by David Doobinin Starring Juliana Hatfield with Ayla Huguenot, Maia Devoy, Ananda Liveright

Songs “Touch You Again” (Juliana Hatfield) “Everything’s For Sale” (Juliana Hatfield) “Wipe It Up” (Juliana Hatfield/John Strohm) “Instrumental” (Juliana Hatfield) “Lost Ship” (Juliana Hatfield) “I Don’t Know What To Do With My Hands” (Juliana Hatfield/Matthew Caws)

David (Doobinin) shot and directed the two videos from my Olivia Newton-John album and he has photographed me, too, and I’ve really liked working with him. There is a casualness to his style that puts me at ease–he doesn’t push too hard. And I like the results. He manages to capture something real about who I am and how I see myself, and not many photographers/vidoegraphers are able to do that. I was talking to David about maybe working with me on a larger project like perhaps documenting the making of my next album. As of now we’ve had trouble scheduling that but we did have time to sort of get our feet wet and shoot some everyday documentary footage in and around my home, which we thought made an interesting little short film.” – Juliana Hatfield “What always struck me about Juliana the previous times we worked together is her physicality. The way she moves through each moment. It’s an unselfconscious dance that teeters between a stumbling Chevy Chase and a Runway Model. She has this fearlessness in her music and the way she lives her life. I wanted to try and capture some of that.” – David Doobinin

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Sometime earlier this summer, Juliana Hatfield was shredding alongside waste treatment machinery on Deer Island, and it was freakin’ awesome. Amidst a million subtle shades of pink and surprisingly industrial imagery, Hatfield’s new video, “Lost Ship”, paints her as the take-no-BS Boston woman we’ve always known her to be.

“No one has any power over me,” she sings, which she quickly follows with “I wanna ride on a spaceship in my mind,” both lyrics that recall her steadfast agency and desire to peace the hell out.

The next taste of her forthcoming 2019 record Weird, Hatfield’s video for “Lost Ship” was filmed on Massachusetts’ Deer Island earlier this year. With a little more than a month to go until Weird debuts on American Laundromat Records to be released in January, from the former Blake Babies member .

“Rachel Lichtman of the awesome Network 77 hipped me to this place called Deer Island in Winthrop, Massachusetts and we shot the video there,” she says . “It’s right in my backyard, practically, but I had never been there before. It was such a cool sci-fi setting, with the wind and those gigantic egg-shaped structures which are part of the waste treatment facility out there. Rachel made this a beautiful haunting video.”

Echoing Hatfield’s cut-off-from-the-world’s sentiments of Weird, director Rachel Lichtman honed in on her blissfully alone beauty for the video’s imagery.

“I feel like Juliana and I created something that so beautifully captures the powerful freedom of the chosen isolation described in ‘Lost Ship,’” Lichtman explains. “Juliana seems a futuristic goddess, luxuriously alone, atop what looks like the remnants of the industrialized world; she’s not bothered or indebted or compromised. We shot it just the two of us on the last warm day of summer, and I think that energy translates through and captures the essence of this brilliant song.”

“Lost Ship” by Juliana Hatfield from the album “Weird” out January 18th, 2019 on American Laundromat Records.

Juliana Hatfield Indulges Her Sweet Tooth on New Olivia Newton-John Covers Album

In song, as in romance, one never forgets their first love. No matter how cheesy or childish it may seem later, the memory of that initial encounter with the music’s emotional power never goes away. For Juliana Hatfield, it was Olivia Newton-John.

But Hatfield never committed the betrayal that most of us are guilty of. She never spurned her middle-school crush when she got to high school. Hatfield stayed true to Newton-John. She embraced punk rock as an older adolescent, but did not turn her back on the Australian singer of “Have You Ever Been Mellow.” And it’s that combination of illusion-grinding guitars and heart-on-the-sleeve pop tunes that has made Juliana Hatfield one of the most rewarding and underrated artists in the indie-rock generation.

“For my whole career, without consciously realizing it, I’ve been trying to integrate Olivia and X, the sweet pop and the messy punk. I’ve always had those two sides to me, not only in what I play but also in what I listen to. I veer back and forth like a pendulum.”

“Even when I fell in love with the band X,” Hatfield explains, “I never lost my love for Olivia. I never hid it. Different parts of my personality are drawn to different musics. The angry part of me is attracted to more aggressive music and more aggressive performances, like Exene’s voice, or more humor maybe, like The Replacements and Devo. The idealistic part of me is drawn to melodies and harmonies, like Olivia’s singing. For me it’s fine to like Olivia Newton-John and a band like Black Flag.”

So far from hiding her first musical love, Hatfield is celebrating it on the new album Juliana Hatfield Sings Olivia Newton-John, on American Laundromat Records. With her longtime rock ‘n’ roll rhythm section of drummer Pete Caldes and bassist Ed Valauskas, Hatfield remakes 13 of Newton-John’s songs (one of them in two different mixes), including seven singles that reached the U.S. pop top 10. Hatfield scuffs them up a little but not so much that they lose their essential, sweetness.

Hatfield was 10 years old, living in the Boston suburb of Duxbury, when the movie Grease and its soundtrack were released in 1978. She was fascinated by the character of Sandy, played by Newton-John, an exchange student from Australia and a goody-good girl who falls for the greaser bad boy Danny, played by John Travolta. Like the fifth-grader Hatfield, Sandy was essentially a rule-abiding girl who was attracted to the rule-breaking world of juvenile delinquents and rock music. Hatfield took her cue from a role model who was able to cross that boundary without compromising her principles.

“When I was a kid,” Hatfield recalls, “I just related to Olivia’s sense of innocence, especially when she was singing. I even had a friend curl my hair so I looked like Sandy. I like to think that Sandy was putting on that bad-girl persona as a goof, because she realized that this was just a game that people play. I don’t like to think she put on a mask just to get the guy. I didn’t want to believe that you have to sex yourself up to find love. I never made that choice to change myself like that. Maybe my life would be easier if I had.”

Hatfield had a different interpretation of the punk ethos than some of her friends. For her, punk wasn’t defined by drugs and promiscuous sex; it was defined by staying true to one’s own moral code, whatever that was. That’s why Newton-John still made sense to her when she picked up a guitar and started playing punk rock, even persuading her high school cover band to add some X songs to a setlist dominated by Journey and Styx.

“Maybe it was in my DNA,” she suggests. “Maybe I had a punk heart; I didn’t want to do things because everyone else was doing them. I was impervious to peer pressure, and that isolated me a bit, because I wouldn’t give in and do what the other kids did. So I felt an affinity with Olivia, because she also had this good-girl curse. I felt like an outcast because all my friends in high school and college were doing drugs, getting drunk and having sex, but I didn’t want to. I was hanging out with these people, but it didn’t feel right to me; I wasn’t ready or interested. I knew I would do things on my own time line.”

It was in 1986 at Boston’s Berklee College of Music that she formed The Blake Babies with guitarist John Strohm and drummer Freda Boner. The Lemonheads’ Evan Dando was also briefly the group’s bassist, and when he left, Hatfield was persuaded to shift from guitar and emulate Dando’s unusually melodic bass lines. Even after she returned to guitar in 1994 with her own group, she ever after wrote tuneful, prominent parts for her bassists to contrast against her brittle guitar riffs. “I like melodic bass players like Evan and Paul McCartney,” she says. “I get bored holding down the bottom, and I love melody, so I played that way. The bass players I hire know what I like to hear. It frees up the guitar to not be so melodic. I always have some anxiety about my records becoming too monochrome or not grooving enough, and I always go to melody to fix things.”

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The Blake Babies were a delightful indie-rock outfit, but the trio eventually broke up as Hatfield wanted to further emphasize the pop elements in the group’s sound, a move her bandmates resisted.  Hatfield loved the vocal-harmony echoes of Newton-John she heard in hits like “Hold On,” but Strohm and Boner dismissed it as juvenile fluff. “When I left The Blake Babies,” she says, “I was miserable because I wanted to do my own thing, but I missed being in a gang—a band is like a gang that has your back. The other members are a cushion against criticism. But I wanted to have more control over the music; I wanted to be able to say, ‘This is how I want to do it, and that’s how we’re going to do it.”

Earlier this spring, American Laundromat Records released a remastered 25th anniversary vinyl edition of Hatfield’s debut solo album, 1992’s Hey Babe, in a gatefold package. With help from such friends as Dando, John Wesley Harding and Mike Watt, she crafted a new balance between the pop and rock elements in her music. The lead-off track, “Everybody Loves Me but You,” boasts a classic guitar riff, pitted against Hatfield’s rolling bass line, as she wails that the one person whose love she craves is the one person who won’t offer it.

The album got her a deal with Atlantic Records and led to her breakthrough album, 1993’s Become What You Are. “My Sister” hit No. 1 “Spin the Bottle” appeared on the soundtrack for the zeitgeist movie Reality Bites, and Hatfield wound up on the cover of Spin. “My Sister” is a magnificent achievement, using the phrases “I love my sister” and “I hate my sister” to capture the contradictory feelings we often have about the people closest to us. The fact that Hatfield didn’t actually have a sister hardly mattered, given the infectious hook and the evocative details about firecrackers and a Violent Femmes concert.

“I wasn’t trying to put one over on people; it was all about how I was feeling,” she explains. “I just wanted to express the pain I was in. The sister was a metaphor, a construct I used to express my feelings of longing and inadequacy.”

She made two more albums for Atlantic, one (Only Everything) that was released and one (God’s Foot) that never was. She has mostly worked under her own name, but she has also recorded as the Juliana Hatfield Three, Some Girls, Minor Alps, The I Don’t Cares and the reunited Blake Babies.

“A year and a half ago,” she recalls, “I was going to go see Olivia in concert for the first time, but she ended up canceling that string of shows because her cancer had come back. That’s when I decided to make the album. It was just an idea that popped into my mind, because I was immersed with her music again in preparation for the concert. Once we were in the studio, we found ourselves translating those well-written songs through this traditional unit of guitar, bass, drums and my weird voice. We did them as if they were songs we had written.”

“My love for Olivia’s music is not nostalgia,” Hatfield says, “because I still love it and get pleasure from it. There’s something about the timbre of her voice that homes in on my pleasure center. She was never desperately pleading for acceptance or attention from people like other pop stars were. She had this great solid core that is still very appealing to me; she felt very centered. So many stars come across as emotional messes, but she seemed like she really had her shit together.”

Tanya Donelly, Britta Phillips, Lori McKenna, Jill Sobule, Elk City, Veruca Salt, Kristin Hersh, Josie Cotton, The Watson Twins, and Dala are just some of the outstanding artists covering Neil Young’s most popular songs for charity on this wonderful album. All proceeds from this benefit record are donated to Casting For Recovery, whose mission is to enhance the quality of life of women with breast cancer through a unique retreat program that combines breast cancer education and peer support with the therapeutic sport of fly fishing. The program offers opportunities for women to find inspiration, discover renewed energy for life and experience healing connections with other women and nature. CFR serves breast cancer survivors of all ages, in all stages of treatment and recovery, at no cost to participants.

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American Laundromat Records is an independent record label based in Mystic, CT. Founded in 2004, the label is known for its critically-acclaimed tribute and themed compilations, award-winning charity albums, and an impressive roster of original artists

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The Swan Song Series is a collection of songs in which Tanya Donelly — grammy-nominated, singer-songwriter and founding member of three of the most influential and successful bands of the post-punk era (Breeders, Throwing Muses, Belly) — collaborated with friends, musicians and authors and explored an impressive range that wasn’t always captured on previous albums. This exclusive collection includes 31 tracks on an impressive 3 album set.

Tanya Donelly wows with this career-defining collection. Donelly — the grammy-nominated, singer-songwriter + founding member of the Breeders, Throwing Muses, and Belly — collaborated with friends, musicians and authors Rick Moody, Robyn Hitchcock, John Wesley Harding, Bill Janovitz (Buffalo Tom), Tom Gorman and Gail Greenwood (Belly), Claudia Gonson (Magnetic Fields) and others. This exclusive collection includes 31 songs across three albums.

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Tanya Donelly is a singer-songwriter and founding member of three of the most successful bands of the post-punk era.
At the age of 16, she and stepsister Kristin Hersh formed Throwing Muses, which became the first American band ever signed to the influential British label 4AD. Not only did the Muses‘ dreamy, swirling guitar sound prove highly influential on many of the alternative acts to emerge in their wake, but they also made any number of unprecedented advances into the male-dominated world of underground rock.

Donelly later sidelined with Pixies bassist Kim Deal to form the Breeders, appearing on the debut LP, Pod. She later exited both the Breeders and Throwing Muses to form her own band, Belly.
After issuing a pair of well-received EPs, Belly released their full-length debut, Star — a superb collection of luminous, fairy tale-like guitar pop songs — and for the first time in her career, Donelly earned commercial success commensurate to her usual critical accolades.

Not only did the record go gold on the strength of the hit single ‘Feed the Tree’ but the band even garnered a Grammy nomination for Best New Artist. Donelly would eventually disband Belly to raise her two daughters.

*Special ACLU Benefit Bundle* A portion of all sales from this special bundle will be donated to the ACLU. The bundle includes the Swan Song Series on Vinyl + Say Yes! A Tribute to Elliott Smith on CD, featuring Tanya covering “Between The Bars.”

We had a blast working on a tribute to one of our favorite flicks of all time – the 1984 cult classic “Repo Man” written & directed by Alex Cox and featuring Harry Dean Stanton and Emilio Estevez. The original soundtrack celebrated the southern California punk movement of the late 70’s/early 80’s with bands Black Flag, Circle Jerks, Suicidal Tendencies, The Plugz, and Iggy Pop. It’s no surprise that an oddball film by an oddball director would demand a pretty oddball soundtrack. So instead of opting for full-on cod-punk, you have hardcore from Suicidal Tendencies and Black Flag’s mock-jock anthem ‘TV Party’ interspersed with the spanish-style mambo of ‘Hombre Secreto’ and the bluesy semi-instrumentals of ‘Bad Man’ and ‘When the Shit Hits the Fan’. Throw in a cover version of the Modern Lovers‘ ode to ‘Pablo Picasso’ and the sublime instrumental ‘Reel Ten’ and you have the perfect accompaniment to a late night drive. Just remember to keep the doors locked and do not leave your car unattended.

We’ve recruited an outstanding group of artists to cover these now-classic punk tracks, including; Those Darlins, Matthew Sweet, Amanda Palmer, Mike Watt, The Tellers, Black Francis, Weekend, Polar Bear Club, Moses Coltrane, New York Rivals, and The Suicide Dolls. The 6-panel CD Eco-Wallet features original illustrations by revered rock-poster designer Lonny Unitus (Melvins, Decemberists, Willie Nelson), includes full production/player credits, and some great elements inspired from the original film.

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American Laundromat Records is an independent record label based in Mystic, CT. Founded in 2004, the label is known for its critically-acclaimed tribute and themed compilations, award-winning charity albums, and an impressive roster of original artists

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Juliana Hatfield is back with 14 brand new songs, including the instant-classic “Wonder Why.” “I wasn’t planning on making a record,” says Juliana Hatfield of “Pussycat”. In fact, she thought her songwriting career was on hiatus, and that she had nothing left to say in song form; that she had finally said it all after two decades as a recording artist. But then the presidential election happened. “All of these songs just started pouring out of me. And I felt an urgency to record them, to get them down, and get them out there.”

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Pussycat is the kind of bluntly political record Hatfield used to be knocked for shying away from. At the height of her 1990s stardom, Hatfield was dismissed in the more activist corners of the music world as a lightweight (never mind that her songs frequently explored the ways society needles and dismisses women). She’s spent her career in an often thankless middle ground, too feminine for the masculine music press, yet not punk enough for the riot grrls. But Pussycat lends to the case for a critical reappraisal. Now would be an ideal time for one, given how the DNA of Hatfield’s hooky, plainspoken alterna-pop has carried through some of indie-rock’s sharpest young songwriters, from artists like Waxahatchee to Bully and Charly Bliss, artists that have demonstrated there’s plenty of substance in this sound. What a treat it would be if, 30 years into their careers, they were all making records as relevant, passionate, and strangely personable as this one.

CD Track List:

  1. Panic – Kitten
  2. Stop Me If You Think You’ve Heard This One Before – The Rest
  3. What Difference Does It Make? – Joy Zipper
  4. Shoplifters of the World Unite – Tanya Donelly w/ Dylan in the Movies
  5. Please Please Please Let Me Get What I Want – William Fitzsimmons
  6. I Won’t Share You – Sixpence None the Richer
  7. Well I Wonder – Sara Lov
  8. Half a Person – Greg Laswell
  9. Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me – Dala
  10. Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others – Chikita Violenta
  11. Sheila Take A Bow – Telekinesis
  12. Is It Really So Strange? – Solvents
  13. Hand In Glove – The Wedding Present
  14. How Soon Is Now? – Mike Viola and The Section Quartet
  15. There Is a Light That Never Goes Out – Trespassers William
  16. Rubber Ring – Girl in a Coma
  17. I Know It’s Over – Elk City
  18. What She Said – Katy Goodman (La Sera, Vivian Girls)
  19. London – Cinerama
  20. Reel Around the Fountain – Doug Martsch (Built To Spill)

On vinyl for the first time ever!!! Remastered Collectors Edition. Exclusive one-time run on Powder Blue Vinyl. Double-LP, Dual Gatefold Jacket, Download Card. Only 500 are being pressed.

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“An awesome cover-compilation!” –Paste

“An outstanding and highly varied assortment of Smiths covers” –Consequence of Sound

“A worthwhile tribute that reinvents the songs while retaining The Smiths glorious spirit.” –NME

“A wonderful 20-song, double-LP blockbuster!” –The Big Takeover

The Caulfield Sisters "Say It With Fire" EP

American laundromat Records have done a very special reissue of The Caulfield Sisters debut EP “Say It With Fire” on a one-time, limited edition run of 150 cassettes. The Super label took great care in preparing this one. Our good friend and designer Lonny Unitus reworked the original CD artwork and added some rare live photos by photographer Jasper Coolidge. Choosing a beautiful purple tint cassette shell, and spared no expense duplicating at National Audio Company on the very best Chrome Plus tapes with Dolby B NR. It also includes digital download card. The Caulfield Sisters are a critically praised independent band, noted at times for their sonic similarity to Throwing Muses and Galaxie 500. They have appeared at the annual CMJ music marathon, were featured in the New York art magazine Esopus,

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The Caulfield Sisters have been called the Brooklyn Breeders and were named one of “NYC’s 10 Bands to Watch” by Time Out New York magazine. Featuring former members of the bands Pee Shy and Gloria Deluxe, The Caulfield Sisters debut EP “Say It With Fire” is a stunning release that has enjoyed critical acclaim worldwide.

“Sounds like angel babies from heaven after a night with Uncle Makers Mark” – VICE magazine

“Whimsical, beautiful and a little sad…atmospheric gems that will have you swaying back and forth, eyes closed and a sloppy grin on your face. Clearly these ladies have all the raw dreamy notions that most current music completely lacks.” – BUST magazine

“Perhaps the finest noise pop band in town” – Time Out New York

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Its great to be able to share Juliana Hatfield’s awesome video for “Short-Fingered Man” from her upcoming album “Pussycat”.

“For this video I shot a bunch of footage of myself in my hallway. I love sixties dancing so I did a bunch of that. Also I was thinking of early Jean Rollin vampire movies and of “Alphaville” (Godard) and those scenes near the end in which Anna Karina–and other residents of Alphaville–start to lose their equilibrium in the hallway and can’t keep themselves walking in a straight line. Caroline Jaecks took all of my footage and masterfully constructed a neat little narrative out of it that fits the song really well.”