Posts Tagged ‘Julia Cumming’

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Brooklyn-native rock band Sunflower Bean released on Friday a pulsating new single titled “Human For.” The single is the latest release off the band’s highly anticipated sophomore album, “Twentytwo in Blue”, set to be released March 23rd on Mom + Pop Records. Previous tracks from the album include “I Was a Fool,” “Crisis Fest” and “Twentytwo.”

“Human For” steps away from the melodic tones found in these previous tracks and does something truly experimental. The gripping bass lines of bassist/lead singer Julia Cumming start the song off with a high energy that is only amplified by her powerful vocals and unapologetic lyrics. The song then takes a darkly psychedelic turn as dissonant chords begin to play and a sound bite of a reverend can be heard in the background, talking about “salvation” and “sanctification by the spirit.”

The previously released tracks have all tackled issues taken on by a person coming of age, and “Human For” is no different. Like the tracks preceding it, “Human For” tries to accurately describe a unique aspect of the transitional phase from teenager to adult. In this case, the single talks about the unlearning of a belief system in order to find self-meaning and a personal truth. In an interview with The Fader, Cumming spoke more in-depth about the lessons she learned while leaving her teens and about the single itself:

Something I’ve noticed about getting older, at least with myself, is accepting people and being able to comment on the world more. “Human For” is urgent to the point of desperation and not needing someone else’s idea of religion or whatever you need to protect yourself. You can make that yourself. You can find reason in your own meaning.

Sunflower Bean are currently on tour they play the Rescue Rooms on Saturday, and will be touring until the summer, in support of this forthcoming album.

Listen to the band’s latest single below, Then, revisit the music video for their previous single “Twentytwo”

 

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Sunflower Bean is a New York rock band featuring Nick Kivlen (lead guitar and vocals), Jacob Faber (drums), and Julia Cumming (bass and lead vocals). Their new album Twentytwo In Blue comes out later this month on Mom + Pop Records.

Sunflower Bean put the “party” in day party. Watch the New York three-piece rock out during our SXSW event.

Proud inheritors of the inimitable New York rock tradition, Sunflower Bean deliver resonant anthems with chiming guitars that will take you back to…well, name your favorite year. It might just be 2018.

Songs Performed: 0:50 I Was a Fool 4:35 Crisis Fest 13:35 Twenty Two 18:40 Easier Said

Band Members
Jacob Faber (drums)
Julia Cumming (vox/bass)
Nick Kivlen (vox/guitar)

Our new single, “Twentytwo” is out now! We’ve been waiting to share this song with you for so long. It’s about resilience, enduring the tide, standing through the waves. It’s one of our favorite songs on the upcoming album, Twenty Two in Blue, due out March 23rd. We hope you love it as much as we do. It’s available now everywhere you listen to music.

The track sees the band, and especially lead vocalist Julia Cumming, channel their inner Fleetwood Mac for a glam-folk that’s gorgeous and lush while feeling fragile in places. Even paraphrasing some Dylan Thomas poetry for extra poignancy.

It’s a truly beautiful number and sees Sunflower Bean grow from their former anarchic roots to find a common thread among us all. If it’s an evolution seen on the album .

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Sunflower Bean made a late play for putting out one of 2017’s best songs when they released “I Was a Fool” in November, the first new music they had released since their acclaimed 2016 debut Human Ceremony. Today, the New York trio have done us one better by announcing their second album Twentytwo in Blue, due out March 23rd via Mom + Pop Records. Jacob Faber, Julia Cumming and Nick Kivlen will each be 22 years old at the time of the record’s release, which comes almost two years and two months after that of Human Ceremony. See what they did there?

Twentytwo in Blue’s second single is “Crisis Fest,” an urgent, yet upbeat call to arms that warns, “If you hold us back, you know that we can shout / We brought you into this place, you know we can take you out.” The track feels of our time and timeless at once, a heartening and defiant reminder of rock ‘n’ roll’s power to galvanize. “2017—we know / Reality’s one big sick show,” sings vocalist/bassist Cumming. “Every day’s a crisis fest.” “Crisis Fest” also received an Andy DeLuca-directed music video,

Sunflower Bean say of their new song:

This last year was extremely alarming, traumatic and politically volatile. While writing this album, we often reflected back on the people we met while on tour. We felt a strong kinship with the audiences that came to see us all over the country, and we wanted to write a song for them—something to capture the anxieties of an uncertain future. “Crisis Fest” is less about politics and more about the power of us, the young people in this country.

Indeed, the band is unafraid to address the many anxieties of our modern moment on their new album, which was co-produced by Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s Jacob Portrait (who also mixed the record) and Matt Molnar of Friends.

Says vocalist guitarist Kivlen:

This has been such an unbelievable time. I can’t imagine any artist of our ilk making a record and not have it be seen through the lens of the political climate of 2016 and 2017. So I think there’s a few songs on the record that are definitely heavily influenced by this sort of—whatever you want to say what the Trump administration has been.

“A shit show,” answers Faber.

Listen to “Crisis Fest” below ,Twentytwo in Blue is out March 23rd on Mom +  Pop Records.

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Perhaps the top band on my radar for the week , Sunflower Bean played the songs off of their engaging and interesting-at-every-turn debut “Human Ceremony” The band had the same luster that they have on the album. While Julia Cumming’s gorgeous voice is a standout on the record, it was Nick Kivlen’s off-into-space guitar musings that might slip past you if you don’t see this band live. Drummer Jacob Faber was frenetic and it became clear what a balanced three-piece the New York band is. The best moments were when the vocals stopped and the trio ventured into instrumental explorations—none better than the final stretch of “I Was Home.” Through their own breed of psych rock,

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Sunflower Bean are back with their first new music since their February 2016 debut Human Ceremony. The New York dream-pop trio—made up of drummer Jacob Faber, vocalist/bassist Julia Cumming and vocalist/guitarist Nick Kivlen—have signed to Mom + Pop Records and shared new single “I Was a Fool,” with a prom-inspired, Apple Music-exclusive music video to match.

Kivlen explained the song’s genesis in a statement: “I Was A Fool” is one of those songs that seemingly crept up from nowhere and into our practice space. It was a special moment between the three of us, Julia and I both improvised the lyrics. It feels like far longer, but it’s been nearly two years since we’ve put new music into the world. I think this song is a good example of how we’ve grown as a band, while still staying true to the band that first played together back in high school.

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Despite its blissful drift, “I Was a Fool” finds Sunflower Bean at their sharpest, portending a quite triumphant return. Cumming and Kivlen trade off vocals from verse to chorus, lamenting the hazards of love over a layered cloud of melodic guitars, driving bass and jangling percussion. “I was a fool who lost his head,” sings Kivlen, making regret sound surprisingly liberating. If this is what losing one’s head sounds like, we’ll gladly part with ours.

Sunflower Bean have a handful of headlining tour dates on the docket, including stops in Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and San Francisco. They’ve also set a fall U.K. tour supporting Wolf Alice,

The New York trio have made quite a splash this year with their effervescent mix of 90s indie (grunge rock and something more ethereal) and 60s psychedelia. As songs from their debut album, Human Ceremony, veer off into cosmic jams, they sound like an unlikely mix of celestial 90s indie kids Lush and summer of love-era Jefferson Airplane.

Much of the former comes from lead vocalist/bassist Julia Cumming, whose ferocious performance contrasts with the pastoral sweetness of her singing. Guitarist Nick Kivlen – all curly moptop and patterned shirts could have stepped straight from a 60s .

With drummer Jacob Faber thrashing away behind, this threesome make a spectacle as Cumming prowls around her bandmate, grins at the crowd and often leaps into the throng while playing. “This is such fun,” she yells as their set flits from the beautiful guitar shapes of Human Ceremony . Check out their Limited Edition 12″ of covers now only available at their gig I’m afraid.

From The Basement is a 4 song EP featuring cover versions of songs originally by The Modern Lovers, Neil Young, Spiritualized and T-Rex. Pressed on clear green vinyl, it’s limited to 500 copies worldwide.

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Sunflower Bean are
Jacob Faber
Julia Cumming
Nick Kivlen

sunflower bean

An all-ages acid trip for fans of: Tame Impala, the Velvet Underground, Menace Beach

Why You Should Pay Attention: Brooklyn’s fuzzy, neo-psychedelic Sunflower Bean are hitting the pavement hard this year. The trio of Julia Cumming, Nick Kivlen and Jacob Faber formed the band two years ago and rapidly became teenage heroes of Brooklyn rock. They’ve been playing for primarily older crowds, but it hasn’t come with too many hurdles. “Sometimes there have been venues where we have to stand outside of the venue the whole time and can only go in to play,” says Cumming. They released their debut EP, the excellent Show Me Your Seven Secrets, last year and then dropped their seven-inch, “I Hear Voices” signed to Fat Possum. They’re currently hard at work on their debut full-length, titled Human Ceremony: due out early in stores February 5th on Fat Possum Records

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They Say: When the band celebrated the release of their latest seven-inch at Rough Trade NYC we expected a party.  Then the EP release show at [Brooklyn venue] Baby’s All Right was really fun and definitely felt really special to us,” Cumming recalls. “[The EP] was our first collection of music besides our singles that we put out, so we put streamers everywhere and served baked goods.”

There’s been an huge amount on the music blogs recently about Sunflower Bean . In truth, half the focus has zeroed in on the young trio’s neo-psych, motorik beat blasted pop, and half has been centered around willowy vocalist and bassist Julia Cumming.  You’d be forgiven for being style-over-substance-sceptical, but if you see the Brooklyn-based band live, you’ll for sure change your tune. seamlessly slowing and speeding up to an ear-achingly awesome squall, without so much as a glance or nod exchanged. They’re just feeling it. Here is the video for their latest song, “I Hear Voices” which begins by informing the viewer that the entire video was shot on an iPhone 6. What follows are cloaked figures lurking, mall rats gawping, smoke bombs in fields of green, and plenty of hydration. Meanwhile, the song exemplifies their slow-fast-sweet-angsty-psych-pop. Flanger pedal poised—let’s go! The band had this to say about the the song and video: “This song is a representation of life in the digital age. It is an example of how everything means nothing and nothing means everything. The making of this video was a meditation on life in 2015! We worked with our friend, artist Kyle Hide and we really like the way he interpreted the song and wanted to collaborate with him on the project.” Hide continued: “The song made me think about phones and the role that telecommunications play to make voices touch each other over long distances. I also thought about the paranoia of always being watched and the fear of government surveillance. The video is inspired by YouTube culture and home video making culture in general. I’ve always made home videos and music videos. My parents were able to afford a video camera in the 90s when they started to become more affordable to the working class.”