Posts Tagged ‘Julia Cumming’

sunflower bean

An all-ages acid trip for fans of: Tame Impala, the Velvet Underground, Menace Beach

Why You Should Pay Attention: Brooklyn’s fuzzy, neo-psychedelic Sunflower Bean are hitting the pavement hard this year. The trio of Julia Cumming, Nick Kivlen and Jacob Faber formed the band two years ago and rapidly became teenage heroes of Brooklyn rock. They’ve been playing for primarily older crowds, but it hasn’t come with too many hurdles. “Sometimes there have been venues where we have to stand outside of the venue the whole time and can only go in to play,” says Cumming. They released their debut EP, the excellent Show Me Your Seven Secrets, last year and then dropped their seven-inch, “I Hear Voices” signed to Fat Possum. They’re currently hard at work on their debut full-length, titled Human Ceremony: due out early in stores February 5th on Fat Possum Records

http://

They Say: When the band celebrated the release of their latest seven-inch at Rough Trade NYC we expected a party.  Then the EP release show at [Brooklyn venue] Baby’s All Right was really fun and definitely felt really special to us,” Cumming recalls. “[The EP] was our first collection of music besides our singles that we put out, so we put streamers everywhere and served baked goods.”

There’s been an huge amount on the music blogs recently about Sunflower Bean . In truth, half the focus has zeroed in on the young trio’s neo-psych, motorik beat blasted pop, and half has been centered around willowy vocalist and bassist Julia Cumming.  You’d be forgiven for being style-over-substance-sceptical, but if you see the Brooklyn-based band live, you’ll for sure change your tune. seamlessly slowing and speeding up to an ear-achingly awesome squall, without so much as a glance or nod exchanged. They’re just feeling it. Here is the video for their latest song, “I Hear Voices” which begins by informing the viewer that the entire video was shot on an iPhone 6. What follows are cloaked figures lurking, mall rats gawping, smoke bombs in fields of green, and plenty of hydration. Meanwhile, the song exemplifies their slow-fast-sweet-angsty-psych-pop. Flanger pedal poised—let’s go! The band had this to say about the the song and video: “This song is a representation of life in the digital age. It is an example of how everything means nothing and nothing means everything. The making of this video was a meditation on life in 2015! We worked with our friend, artist Kyle Hide and we really like the way he interpreted the song and wanted to collaborate with him on the project.” Hide continued: “The song made me think about phones and the role that telecommunications play to make voices touch each other over long distances. I also thought about the paranoia of always being watched and the fear of government surveillance. The video is inspired by YouTube culture and home video making culture in general. I’ve always made home videos and music videos. My parents were able to afford a video camera in the 90s when they started to become more affordable to the working class.”