Posts Tagged ‘Fat Possum Records’

Royal Trux returned earlier this year with their comeback album White Stuff. Now they have announced a new EP, “Pink Stuff”, which features five songs from the album remixed by Ariel Pink. They have also shared one of its tracks, “Suburban Junky Lady (Ariel Pink Remix).” Pink Stuff is due out September 6th via Fat Possum Records.

Their return to the studio is nothing short of a rock & roll rapture. The magic chemistry between Jennifer Herrema (vocalmoog, guitar, melodica) and Neil Hagerty (vocal, guitar) that brought us Twin Infinitives, Cats and Dogs and their last LP, Pound for Pound in 2000, is present in the unadulterated, exhilarating energy on these new tracks, 

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Check out “Suburban Junky Lady (Ariel Pink Remix),” followed by the EP’s tracklist .

Pink Stuff EP Tracklist:

1. Suburban Junky Lady (Ariel Pink Remix)
2. Year of The Dog (Ariel Pink Remix)
3. Get Used To This (Ariel Pink Remix)
4. White Stuff (Ariel Pink Remix)
5. Whopper Dave (Ariel Pink Remix)

Releases October 4th, 2019

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Townes Van Zandt, has a previously unreleased collection of songs titled “Sky Blue” to be released via Fat Possum on the 7th March (which would have been his 75th birthday).

The recordings were made in early 1973 with the late Bill Hedgepeth, a journalist, musician, and most crucially a close friend of Townes Van Zandt. The singer-songwriter was splitting his time between Texas, Colorado, and a shack outside Franklin, Tennessee: an itinerant life that informed many of his most famous and beloved tunes. Throughout his life he would often return to Hedgepeth’s home studio in Atlanta, later with family in tow, to record, re-work, and experiment with new songs as well as some of his most iconic.

In addition to a handful of old favourites, Sky Blue also includes two new songs that have never been heard before “All I Need”and “Sky Blue”There are early, raw versions of Pancho & Lefty and Rex’s Blues, covers of songs by Richard Dobson and Tom Paxton, a smoky version of Blue Ridge Mountain Blues and a scarred and scarring interpretation of Hills of Roane County, an East Tennessee murder ballad from the 1880s that was popularized by Tony Rice.

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Releases March 7th, 2019

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It feels like a statement of purpose, but then again, so do almost all of Jason Pierce’s transcendent musical compositions that employ overpowering bombast in service of the purest emotions—love, hope, sadness, and, um, drugs. But what sets And Nothing Hurt apart is how it distills his previous stylings down to their essence, a polished diamond of the musician’s sometimes excessive past reaching. There are no hundred-person choirs or symphony orchestras accompanying him; it’s just Pierce and his muse—which isn’t to say these songs are any less packed with booming layers of synth swells and soaring vocals. It’s merely that he’s harnessed his ambition in service of tightly structured beauty, from the sweetly plucked ukulele start of “A Perfect Miracle” to the organ-laced and Pink Floyd-ified anthem “Sail On Through.” These are songs of love and devotion, yes, but they’re also elegant expressions of an artist who knows exactly what he wants to say, and has mastered the art of saying it in the grandest way possible.

‘And Nothing Hurt’ the new album from Spiritualized is out 7th September via Bella Union Records.
‘And Nothing Hurt’ rivalled some of Jason Pierce’s most emotive and touching writing of his career to date. Full of wearied upset and despair at the world around him, Pierce’s voice captured human emotion at its most vulnerable and downtrodden: “You gotta take the pain / You gotta give it all away,” he sings on ‘The Morning After’, one of the album’s standout tracks. Despite the pain Pierce sings of, ‘And Nothing Hurt’ is also an album that finds hope in the very darkest of places, capturing the resilience of humans and how they can embrace the fear to work through it, despite the uncertainly of the times we face.

“Magnificent… Bursting with symphonic goodness, musical adventure and dizzying levels of intensity.” Uncut – 8/10

SpiritualizedAnd Nothing Hurt’ will be released on 7th September 2018 on Bella Union + Fat Possum Records.

Soccer Mommy announced a new 7″ single. The single’s A-Side is a newly reworked version of “Henry,” a song that originally appeared on Soccer Mommy’s 2016 collection For Young HeartsThe B-Side is a cover of Bruce Springsteen’sI’m On Fire,” a live show highlight that now has a long-awaited studio recording. The cover was previously only experienced live and has therefore been long-awaited.

“I wanted to make a version of ‘I’m On Fire’ that connected with the sadness of the song,” explains Allison. “I think that doing a more stripped down version allowed me to make something that feels emotionally raw.” the limited edition release “Red Smoke” 7″, is out October via Fat Possum Records,

The 7″ follows on the heels of her debut album, Clean, that has already received mid-year Best of 2018 nods from the likes of NPR, Rolling Stone, Billboard,Stereogum, Uproxx, Vinyl Me Please, all giving high praise for Soccer Mommy’s debut album, Clean.

Clean is Allison’s excellent studio debut: a compact album of clear melodies, plainspoken lyrics, and the impossibly tangled logic of infatuation.” – Pitchfork(Best New Music, 8.4)

Clean greatly expands the scope of Ms. Allison’s songs in both words and music… Both clear-eyed and passionate, she is growing up in public, unabashed.” – New York Times

She combines mischief and bluntness in the manner of Liz Phair, and her voice has a quality like melting ice cream—sweet and appealingly messy, slipping around the pitch of a note.” – The New Yorker

Soccer Mommy’s Clean is one of the best rock records of the 2018 so far” – The FADER (Gen F)

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This South X Lullaby Session with Soccer Mommy took us away from the frenetic world of the South by Southwest music festival and into the past. Venturing my favorite store in all of Austin, TexasUncommon Objects, is a self-described “one-of-a-kind emporium of transcendent junk” or “your eccentric uncle’s attic on steroids.”

There are 24 different antique sellers under the single, Uncommon Objects roof, and for Sophie Allison, aka Soccer Mommy, it was the perfect setting for her song “Wildflowers.” It was, in fact, filled with objects related to blooming flowers.

The song from the Switzerland-born, Nashville-raised artist is, as I hear it, about finding your place in the world — to discover who you are and to blossom.

“Wildflowers don’t grow in the city
I dreamt the sidewalk broke in two
The earth was calling to me”

The song is from Soccer Mommy’s album Clean which was released earlier this month on Fat Possum Records.

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Melody Prochet of Melody’s Echo Chamber has openly discussed her returned to music after suffering a serious injury by announcing a release of second album Bon Voyage

In June earlier this year, it was reported that Prochet had been forced to cancel her show due to suffering a ‘serious injury’, that injury turned out to be potentially life threatening.

Following a lengthy period of recovery, Melody’s Echo Chamber second album will now be released on June 15th.  addressing the serious accident for the first time, Prochet explained how she still feels unable to discuss the specific details of the accident, She says: “Today I feel blessed, as I’m healed. It’s been traumatic but it has beautifully put some perspective into my eyes and broke a life pattern that didn’t work for me. I’m lucky it revealed more light.”

Given the stresses of what has happened, Prochet also explained that she has not felt ready to write any new music since her accident: “I needed a break from that sort of passion pattern and obsessing over music,” she said. “Open up to other horizons! Traveling the world and doing serious hikes is a new dream of mine. There is always music inside of me. Maybe I’ll let it [stay] in there for a while.”

Now though, in wonderfully positive news, The album made up of seven expansive tracks, Bon Voyage marries Melody’s breathless soprano to the wildest sonic excursions, always pinned to an emphatic, clattering groove as she delivers her fables of spiritual search and emotional healing in multiple tongues (French, English and Swedish).

Prochet’s 2012 self-titled debut ‘Melody’s Echo Chamber’, which was was produced by Tame Impala‘s Kevin Parker – who happens to be her ex-boyfriend, had initially started work on its follow-up the Tame Impala man: “We always had a lot of fun and an easy time creating together,” Prochet says of working with Parker. “The painful part for me was that I had been working on my record for more than a year and I just could not finish it and release it. It’s been a million hours of work, thoughts, tears, a bunch of money invested in the process and lost.”

Melody’s Echo Chamber – “Cross My Heart”.

Melody’s Echo Chamber“Breathe In, Breathe Out” from ‘Bon Voyage’, out 15th June 2018 on Domino Record Co | Fat Possum Records.

Soccer Mommy

Just over two years ago, Sophie Allison was writing melodic bedroom rock ahead of a move from her native Nashville to New York to study music business at NYU. During that time, she started to find a burgeoning fanbase on Bandcamp for her wistful demos under the name Soccer Mommy, which chronicled the harsh realities of the teenage experience. During her tenure at NYU, she began playing live shows around Brooklyn, building a presence in the DIY scene, and it wasn’t long until she caught the ears of Fat Possum (the influential independent label who’ve released records by Wavves, Youth Lagoon, and Lissie) and her life changed.

Still aged just 20, Allison is reeling from her rise to indie-rock stardom. On her recently released debut album Clean, she self-reflects, translating the loneliness and crushing disappointment that comes with being a teenager into intimate musings – a confessional sound that similarly launched the careers of Mitski and Julien Baker. However, age aside, Allison believes her music is universally relatable. “I think it resonates with people because it’s about struggling to be open, honest and take risks: struggling with your own identity,” she explains. “Everybody feels that at some point in their lives.”

Take for example her latest single “Cool”, a raucous track where Allison lilts about what it means to be the “cool girl.” Despite its initial appeal, her pursuit of the “cool girl” trope ends up creating her own unhappiness. Instead, she finds more solace in being herself. In Allison’s video for the track, premiering below, she explores “the depth beyond the image of coolness.” Playing with the idea of cool, Allison blossoms into different versions of herself, all the while interspersed with animated ice cream sandwiches, pot leaves, and crayons. She becomes one of the guys, clad in aviators and a leather jacket; a rocker who flaunts fuschia wing-tip eyeliner and a Hot Topic necklace; and a heartbreaker who chops off the hair of a Ken doll, ultimately revealing that “cool” doesn’t mean just one thing.

Taken from the debut, Clean, available on Fat Possum Records

At Every SXSW, there seems to be one band that you can’t stop hearing about, and that honor goes to Hoops—it feels like everyone I’ve run into has listed them among their favorite sets. The band performed at Cheer Up Charlie’s. The indie-pop four-piece didn’t disappoint, serving up slick guitar lines and a welcome reminder as to why their self-titled EP was among our list of last year’s best. Their full-length debut, Routines, was released in May of last year.

Hoops’ full-length debut, Routines is a bittersweet and honest record that sounds both warmly familiar and jarringly distinctive. Whereas their previous releases were recorded on four-track tape machines in living rooms and basements (both their own and their parents’), Routines marks the band’s first sessions in an actual studio – namely, Rear House Recording in Greenpoint, Brooklyn with Jarvis Taveniere (Widowspeak, Quilt). Those sessions, however, were just one step in the band’s careful creative process. After a few months of touring, they returned to Indiana to set up their gear in Krauter’s parents’ basement and began experimenting with the studio-recorded tracks. Some songs they only tinkered with, others they scrapped completely and rebuilt from the ground up. They were determined to make a record that sounded like Hoops. The result is Routines, the sharpest and clearest delineation of the band’s sound thus far, drawing from and emphasizing each members’ distinctive influences and personal styles: four guys making music that is larger than themselves.

Tracklisting :

SUN’S OUT 0:00 RULES 2:50 ON TOP 5:02 BENJALS 8:47 BURDEN 11:07 ON LETTING GO 14:14 THE WAY LUV IS 17:40 MANAGEMENT 19:40 ALL MY LIFE 23:18 UNDERWATER THEME 26:00 WORRY 28:22

Two of the 10 songs from the new album Courtney Marie Andrews “May Your Kindness Remain”,  astonishingly beautiful new album, have the word kindness in the title. This is not a coincidence. The idea of kindness of empathy, of giving unto others, of needing the same from others — is as central to Andrews’ music  Even when it’s not what she’s singing about, it’s what she’s singing about.

One song on May Your Kindness Remain is about an old, broken-down, permanently messy house and about the couple who used to live there. It’s clear that they’re not still together — “There’s a bed upstairs if you’re ever in town / Or if you need a place to get your feet back on the ground” — but there’s still a fondness, a feeling of togetherness. She sings that the house is their home, that it belongs to both of them, and it feels like a powerful act of generosity, a gift of a song. It’s about how that warmth can outlast the end of a relationship. It’s just lovely.

There are some staggering love songs on May Your Kindness Remain, and there are also songs about needing love, about requiring that sort of empathy. “Lift The Lonely From My Heart” is about depression, about needing someone else’s help to get through it: “Pining, mining for a feeling I’m not finding / Looking to you to tell me what I’m worth.” And then there’s a song like “I’ve Hurt Worse” about knowing that empathy is not coming back to you: “I like you when I have to call you a second time / It keeps me wondering if you are mine / Mother says you love who you think you deserve / But I’ve hurt worse.” Andrews herself calls it a sarcastic song, but I hear a note of longing in there, of self-recrimination. Andrews is working within a country-music tradition that’s long prized a brassy toughness, but even at her hardest, that’s not really what she’s about. And that, in its way, is why a song like that cuts even deeper.

The empathy extends, too, to people beyond Andrews’ relationships, to people she might not know. “Two Cold Nights In Buffalo” is a song about getting stranded in an edge-of-oblivion upstate New York town, taking in all the misery around you, and wondering how shit ever got this bad. It gets a little on-the-nose when Andrews starts wondering how this place ever got this bad — “Is that the American dream dying?” — but it hits hard when she takes in the individual scenes of misery, extrapolating from a glance: “A snowy prison out on Main Street, heaters hang from the cells / A bum searches for shelter, so cold he dreams of hell.” And on “Border Song” she imagines the life of a Mexican immigrant trying to get through the desert, dreaming of a better life that’s still a hell of a lot harder than what most of the people reading this website will ever have to endure: “Stand outside that hardware store / Don’t matter the job they need me for.”

Courtney Marie Andrews’ music isn’t country the way “country” is commonly understood now. It’s country the same way that, for instance, the Black Keys’ music is metal, which is to say that it’s something that could’ve been called country in 1971 even if the tag no longer applies. Her voice has a deep twang, the kind that sticks to you. Her voice is huge, warm, expressive. She’s not a soul singer, but she’s got that soul-singer balance of fire and control, the two elements working together rather than against each other. Occasionally, when she’s really cutting loose, she gets some gospel in her voice. The album has some hazy psychedelic tremolo guitar and some sweaty blues-rock organ. She’s an Americana singer, I guess, but she doesn’t have the sleepy reverence that I (maybe wrongly) tend to associate with Americana singers. Her music is heavy and direct and alive.

Andrews is only 27, but she’s already a veteran. She released her first album when she was a teenager, and she’s been steadily cranking out music for about a decade while moving from Arizona to Seattle to Los Angeles. For a while, she was touring as a keyboardist and a backup singer for Jimmy Eat World. And for a while after that, she was bartending whenever she wasn’t touring. That changed in 2016 with the release of Honest Life, the album that finally got her noticed by the kinds of people who notice really good Americana albums. (I still slept on it.) If Honest Life was Andrews’ break, then May Your Kindness Remain is her big reach.

The new album belongs absolutely to Andrews. She sang and played guitar on every song, and she wrote all of them except for the one she co-wrote with a couple of dudes. She also co-produced it with Mark Howard, a veteran studio type who’s been doing mixing and engineering for people like Bob Dylan and Tom Waits for many years. It’s not a huge leap beyond Honest Life, but it’s got the exact right level of musical lushness. Andrews’ voice dominates, but it doesn’t overpower, and the arrangements shimmer like mirages around her. And for someone like me, someone who’s been shamefully ignorant of all the music that Andrews has been making for all these years, it’s a head-spinning discovery, a warm and gorgeous and fully formed piece of work. The kindness isn’t just in the lyrics. It’s in the way music like this can nourish you, can make your insides glow. An album like this can be a refuge.

May Your Kindness Remain is out on 23rd March on Fat Possum Records/Mama Bird Recordings.

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thanks to Stereogum

Soccer mommy

“I was wasting all my time on someone who didn’t know me,” Sophie Allison sings in the first verse of “Blossom (Wasting All My Time).” It’s the kind of thing you can’t remember if you realized in hindsight, or a part of you knew it all along—the subtle production and the warm strums of the acoustic guitar allowing your mind to drift. “Scorpio Rising” starts out sounding like an updated version of Big Star’s “Thirteen,” before taking a sudden turn when Allison’s young Romeo changes his mind and goes for a girl that In “Flaw,” the end is her fault, though she doesn’t want to believe it. “I choose to blame it all on you/’Cause I don’t like the truth,” she sings, her clear and unpolished voice fittingly going slightly flat.

Clean is the Debut album proper from Nashville based 20 year old Sophie Allison who records under the name Soccer Mommy. Following on from the critically acclaimed Collection, released in August. Clean was recorded by Gabe Wax (Deerhunter, War on Drugs, Beirut) in NYC and mixed by Ali Chant (PJ Harvey, Perfume Genius, Aldous Harding). The album is a big step up production wise, and it’s the most grown up Allison has sounded to date. For fans of Liz Phair, Frankie Cosmos, Angel Olsen and Julia Jacklin.

Taken from the album, Clean, available on Fat Possum Records