Posts Tagged ‘D.C.’

The Ex Hex to Fugazi’s Helium, you can tell Ian MacKaye’s new trio with wife Amy Farina (they were both formerly the Evens) and Fugazi’s Joe Lally is the most fun he’s had in years, with the simplest and most succinct tunes of possibly his career  dare you to not hear flickers of Grease’s “Summer Nights” in “Hard to Explain.” On their just-released self-titled debut, Farina’s pounding drums and Lally’s crawling bass are given roomfuls of atmosphere to walk around in; rarely has a power trio been perfectly content to not fill the audio space. The parity is refreshing, too: “Say Yes” and “Too Many Husbands” are almost entirely Farina’s show and absolutely the funkiest things MacKaye’s ever been part of. A best-case scenario for an artistic democracy in miniature.

The most Fugazi thing on Coriky is “Inauguration Day,” which begins, “Forecast calls for an execution,” if you thought Mr. Straight Edge lost any of his political bite.

MacKaye is best known for being the frontman of the influential hardcore punk and alternative rock bands Minor Threat, Embrace, Fugazi, and The Evens. He is a founder and owner of Dischord Records. understated chorus vocals, Lallys amazing bass sound, and just the perfect amount of MacKaye guitar, to make this track an exceptional opener!.

With the shut down of distributors and record stores still in place across the country and world, Dischord has decided to postpone the release date of the Coriky record until late May. We realize that there are many people who have been waiting for the records they ordered and we very much appreciate their patience. The decision to further postpone the record was made in solidarity with the shuttered shops and distributors and with the hope that the independent music network will survive.

This is uncharted territory, but we’re doing our best to look out for all concerned and hopeful that we can all get to the other side of this together.

Coriky is a band from Washington, D.C. Amy Farina plays drums. Joe Lally plays bass. Ian MacKaye plays guitar. All sing. Formed in 2015, Coriky did not play their first show until 2018. They have recorded one album.

Released June 12th, 2020

The Band:
Amy Farina: Drums, Vocals Joe Lally: Bass, Vocals Ian MacKaye: Guitar, Vocals

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Like irony-breathing critic-turned-rockers from Blue Öyster Cult to Pet Shop Boys, Elizabeth Nelson writes the kind of lyrics those of us still unturned just want to quote at you all day. “An icepick deep in Trotsky’s back — his last thought is that it’s understandable.” “U put the ‘u’ in ‘cruel and unusual’ / But u typically put urself first.” “He went to Julliard / Which isn’t as easy as it sounds.” “What in the world’s come over me? / Asking for a friend.” “They digitally removed the coke from Neil’s nose, you know / Or so the rumour goes. I don’t know.” “I’m pretty sure ‘Ana Ng’ is the best one / But ‘They’ll Need a Crane’ is certainly a close second.” And these are all from 2019’s A Goddamn Impossible Way of Life alone  their seven-year catalogue keeps going back like this; may it keep going forward too. It may be healthier that Nelson and husband Timothy Bracy head up one of the most confident and muscular garage-rock bands going, threading all that deadpan text deftly through darting-needle melodies that stitch together hurtling hard-rock rave-ups. You’ll forgive them for being critical darlings because they’re also the goddamn life of the party.

The many moods of wishing ‘A Goddamn Impossible Way Of Life’ a happy first birthday. The Paranoid Style released our second full-length LP a year ago today, and few things quite literally have ever been the same. I loved making this record so much and only regret not going with my first instinct for an album title: “More Songs About Grover Norquist And Food.” Thanks to everyone who purchased it. The late-adopters and heretics are forgiven.

If all of the above didn’t sell you, “Turpitude”‘s “I smoke for the following reasons — the Contract With America / I smoke because of Pulp Fiction / I smoke because of Mojo Nixon” can’t, can it?

The Paranoid Style Presents: A Girl’s Gotta Eat. The Paranoid Style is Elizabeth Nelson and Timothy Bracy from The Mendoza Line. On this song they are joined by Ken Flagg (MC Frontalot, Edible Norris) and Bruce Bennett (The A-Bones). All songs are written by Nelson and Bracy except where noted.

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Bad Moves’ brand of adolescent angst-fueled power-punk has gone to college, emerging older, wearier, and wiser, while retaining all of its rebellious energy. Aside from some inaudible vocals on the first few tracks, Untenable is a thoughtful, dystopian delight; though that’s no surprise from a band that writes and plays each song like it’s their last.
Bad Moves is four friends making upbeat power-pop about anxiety and identity, drawing on a sound that stretches from forbears like The Nerves and Cheap Trick to contemporary artists like Sheer Mag and Haim. After years knocking around the Washington, D.C. punk scene in bands of their own, guitarists Katie Park and David Combs, bassist Emma Cleveland and drummer Daoud Tyler-Ameen began playing together in 2015, with a few goals in mind: Songwriting would be collaborative, singing would be everyone’s job and arrangements would be generously staggered, blending voices and ideas to avoid centering any one member.
On its self titled 2016 EP, the band explored bleak adulthood, writing about bad jobs, corrupt leaders, frustrated dreams and gentrifying cities. Tours of the US and UK with friends Jeff Rosenstock, Martha, Nana Grizol and The Spook School brought a widening fanbase and a sharpening sound, with new material that dug into the wilderness of childhood and how its lessons ripple out later in life. As anticipation grew for a full-length album, the band made a breakthrough appearance on the Cartoon Network’s Craig of the Creek, voicing their animated selves in an episode about the show’s lead characters putting on their first DIY concert.
“Tell No One”, was released September. 21st, 2018 on Don Giovanni Records, was Bad Moves’ debut LP: 12 songs about confronting old secrets and stumbling into self-discovery, wrapped in a sound that hometown weekly Washington City Paper calls “exuberant catharsis, the type of pop that makes you breathe deep and shout.”

“Untenable”, released June 26th, 2020 on Don Giovanni Records, is the sophomore full-length by Washington, D.C.’s Bad Moves.

Back in 2018, Washington D.C. rockers Bad Moves, who’ve been at it since 2015, among the Washington D.C. bands of the moment. Two years later, their placement on such a list remains more than worthy. They released their punchy debut album Tell No One that year on Don Giovanni Records, which alerted us to their appearance at 2019’s SXSW. Tell No One thrived on shreddy power-pop, and it appears there’ll be plenty more where that came from on Untenable. Bad Moves make music about begrudgingly growing up and then finally treating adulthood like a party. Their punk music may be a protest of boredom itself.

On this record, the band has leaned into the outer edges of their influences, expanding their power-pop umbrella to include hints of folk, garage rock, and ’90s “indie” while still keeping the hooks tuneful and sticky. Lyrically, the band explores the myriad anxieties of modern living

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Out May 29th, Untenable is the sophomore full-length by Washington, D.C.’s Bad Moves. On this record, the band has leaned into the outer edges of their influences, expanding their power-pop umbrella to include hints of folk, garage rock, and ’90s “indie” while still keeping the hooks tuneful and sticky. Lyrically, the band explores the myriad anxieties of modern living — from heady questions of self-definition and identity to day-to-day matters, like labour precarity, climate change, social media, automation and the surveillance state.

Bad MovesUntenable” released Don Giovanni Records

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Formed in 2015, Coriky did not play their first show until 2018. They have recorded one album. They hope to tour.

Coriky is a band from Washington, D.C. Amy Farina plays drums. Joe Lally plays bass. Ian MacKaye plays guitar. They all sing. One night in the long-ago time of February 2020, Ian MacKaye stood onstage in Charlottesville, Virginia and sang these words: “What’s surprising is the expectation that we’d ever have a say/ About who’d be standing on that carpet on inauguration day.” There was no mistaking that line. Nobody in the crowd had heard the song “Inauguration Day” before that night, but MacKaye’s new band Coriky had printed up a big stack of photocopied lyric sheets, and they were all sitting at the table where people came in. At the time, I thought this line was cold and fatalistic. At the time, it looked like maybe something actually could be achieved from people trying to have their say. The coronavirus pandemic hadn’t happened.

I just listened to the new Coricky album straight through and it is really excellent. It’s so nice to hear people I love singing and playing new music together!, Ian MacKaye was right. He usually is. MacKaye’s work — with Minor Threat, with Embrace, with Fugazi, with the half-dozen other bands he’s sung for — has meant a whole lot to a whole lot of people. It’s been possible, over the years, to hold MacKaye up as some kind of totem of punk rock idealism. But that’s overly simplistic, and it also does a great disservice to the actual music that MacKaye has made and that often doesn’t fit that monastic punk-rock saint narrative.

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For much of the ’00s and ’10s, for instance, MacKaye was half of the Evens, a duo with the drummer and singer Amy Farina. Their music was quiet, murmured, internal. It sounded like two people having a conversation with their voices and their instruments. MacKaye’s baritone guitar rumbled and sparkled. Farina’s drums shuffled and danced, doing complicated polyrhythmic push-pulls. MacKaye’s voice is a stentorian bellow, and Farina’s is a crystalline alto, but the somehow harmonized beautifully. They still do.

Coriky, the new band, is MacKaye, Farina, and bassist Joe Lally, MacKaye’s longtime bandmate in Fugazi. MacKaye has said that the three of them have been a band for five years and that they simply spent the first four of those years playing together in a basement, not in public. You can tell. These three people already knew each other very well, and they would’ve known each other very well even without those years in the basement. Coriky’s self-titled debut does not sound like a debut. It sounds like the work of a veteran band with a long-established chemistry.

In Coriky, you can hear that miraculous thing that can happen when musicians understand and trust one another. Lally’s basslines are slow and rich and resonant, and they always lent a crucial and unsung dimension to Fugazi’s sound. In Coriky, Lally and Farina don’t lock in with one another that often. Instead, they dart in and out of each other, pushing each other in different directions. MacKaye’s guitar rings and tingles and sometimes erupts. On the album, you can hear three people developing a whole new musical language, a way of interacting. It’s exciting.

Bands aren’t math equations. Coriky isn’t Fugazi with Amy Farina playing the Guy Picciotto and Brendan Canty roles. It’s also not the Evens with a bass player. There are moments where Coriky sound like Fugazi or like the Evens. Nobody on earth sounds like Ian MacKaye, so everytime he opens up his throat, it calls up entire lifetimes of righteous, anthemic music. But the sound on Coriky is strikingly fully formed. The album has an ominous, uneasy beauty that doesn’t really sound like anything these three musicians have ever done.

Released June 12th, 2020

The band:

Amy Farina: Drums, Vocals
Joe Lally: Bass, Vocals
Ian MacKaye: Guitar, Vocals

Coriky is out 6/12 on Dischord Records.

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Bad Moves is four friends making upbeat power-pop about anxiety and identity, drawing on a sound that stretches from forbears like The Nerves and Cheap Trick to contemporary artists like Sheer Mag and Haim. After years knocking around the Washington, D.C. punk scene in bands of their own, guitarists Katie Park and David Combs, bassist Emma Cleveland and drummer Daoud Tyler-Ameen began playing together in 2015, with a few goals in mind: Songwriting would be collaborative, singing would be everyone’s job and arrangements would be generously staggered, blending voices and ideas to avoid centreing any one member.

Back in 2018, D.C. rockers Bad Moves, who’ve been at it since 2015, appeared on our list of the best Washington D.C. bands of the moment. Two years later, their placement on such a list remains more than worthy. They released their punchy debut album Tell No One that year on Don Giovanni, which alerted us to their appearance at 2019’s SXSW. Tell No One thrived on shreddy power-pop, and it appears there’ll be plenty more where that came from on Untenable. Bad Moves make music about begrudgingly growing up and then finally treating adulthood like a party. Their punk music may be a protest of boredom itself.

Pre-Order Untenable on Don Giovanni Records

A product of the burgeoning Washington, D.C. punk scene, Gauche fill their songs with the kind of biting political commentary you’d expect from a group making music in the shadow of the White House. “Pay Day” is an unsparing look at wage inequality; on “History,” Mary Jane Regalado vents her rage at seeing her accomplishments stolen by men who take the credit. But like the equally political post-punk groups of the late ’70s, Gauche also know that dancing can itself be a weapon. Accordingly, the group employs bouncy sax, tense bass lines, and riotous yelps—conjuring the B-52s, Le Tigre, and Essential Logic in one manic package.

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released July 12th, 2019

Jason P. Barnett: Guitar, Bass, Vocals
Adrienne CN Berry: Saxophone, Vocals
Mary Jane Regalado: Vocals, Bass, Guitar
Pearie Sol: Keyboards
Laurie Spector: Bass, Drums
Daniele Yandel: Vocals, Drums, Bass, Guitar

A split single five years in the making featuring the lead vocals of Kathleen Wilson (see also The Hall Monitors). First, Jake Starr & The Delicious Fullness show Dusty Springfield’s “Little By Little” no mercy with Jake delivering the low vox to Kathleen’s wail. Then on the flip, Thee Lexington Arrows rip through “Gimme Shelter”–surely the inheritors to Merry Clayton’s fantastic solo version! 300 total pressed with 200 on milky clear vinyl and 100 on black vinyl. After fronting Washington DC garage rockers Adam West for nearly 17 years, soft-spoken, mild-mannered Jake Starr took time off to recharge his batteries. Now he’s back to deliver high-octane, garage rock-n-roll 

“Little By Little” originally performed by Dusty Springfield 

Kathleen Wilson: Lead and backing vox, guitar • Nathaniel Osgood: Drums • Louie Newmyer: Bass • Sean Crowley: Guitar • Jake Starr: Backing throat, tambourine.

released April 26th, 2019 Jake Starr & The Delicious Fullness

Royal Trux returned earlier this year with their comeback album White Stuff. Now they have announced a new EP, “Pink Stuff”, which features five songs from the album remixed by Ariel Pink. They have also shared one of its tracks, “Suburban Junky Lady (Ariel Pink Remix).” Pink Stuff is due out September 6th via Fat Possum Records.

Their return to the studio is nothing short of a rock & roll rapture. The magic chemistry between Jennifer Herrema (vocalmoog, guitar, melodica) and Neil Hagerty (vocal, guitar) that brought us Twin Infinitives, Cats and Dogs and their last LP, Pound for Pound in 2000, is present in the unadulterated, exhilarating energy on these new tracks, 

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Check out “Suburban Junky Lady (Ariel Pink Remix),” followed by the EP’s tracklist .

Pink Stuff EP Tracklist:

1. Suburban Junky Lady (Ariel Pink Remix)
2. Year of The Dog (Ariel Pink Remix)
3. Get Used To This (Ariel Pink Remix)
4. White Stuff (Ariel Pink Remix)
5. Whopper Dave (Ariel Pink Remix)

Releases October 4th, 2019

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Washington, DC power poppers Dot Dash have announced a series of shows with The Undertones, The Minus 5, and The Vibrators. The trio is still flying high on the momentum created from their excellent LP – ‘Proto Retro’, released last July. Reminiscent of the greatest jangle pop music ever, yet unique and original. Along the way, Dot Dash has played shows with The Brian Jonestown Massacre, Richard Lloyd (ex-Television), The B-52s, The Monochrome Set, Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, The Psychedelic Furs, The Chameleons, The Dickies, Ash, Hugh Cornwell (ex-Stranglers), Stiff Little Fingers, Tommy Keene, The Fleshtones, Glen Matlock (ex-Sex Pistols), The Drums, Urge Overkill, The Bats, Ultimate Painting,

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Dot Dash is  — Terry Banks (guitar & vocals), Hunter Bennett (bass), and Danny Ingram (drums.) Ex-bands within the Dot Dash orbit include power-poppy indie rockers Julie Ocean; hardcore pioneers Youth Brigade and The Untouchables; indie poppers The Saturday People, Tree Fort Angst, Glo-Worm, and St. Christopher; plus Swervedriver and Strange Boutique.

Dot Dash’s new album Proto Retro, the band’s sixth long player, is out now on The Beautiful Music. It’s the label’s 42nd release and was recorded at Inner Ear and The Bastille and produced by Geoff Sanoff.