Posts Tagged ‘Don Giovanni Records’

Laura Stevenson‘s second album with The Cans as her backing band, the modern classic “Sit Resist”, turns 10 this year, and we’ve very excited to be teaming up with her to help celebrate that anniversary with a livestream performance of the album in full. “Sit Resist (At Home)” airs on Saturday, February 13 at 8 PM ET (5 PM PT), and tickets, including merch bundles, are on sale now.

“We had a handful of full-band, full album “Sit Resist” shows planned around the release of the reissue before the pandemic put an end to that,” Laura says. “This is probably the closest we can get to actually pulling it off. This will be the first time I’ve ever played some of these songs for an audience. It feels like we took a lot of pre-pandemic life for granted, one of those things being the ability to freely gather together and experience all that music does for communal connection. Livestreams will never be the same as that experience, but I’m hoping this will fill a couple of the cracks in the meantime. 

The thirteen song album has been remastered at the hallowed Abbey Road Studios in London from the original 1/4” analog master tapes, and the vinyl processed with a new half speed lacquer cut to ensure the highest quality audio possible. The bonus LP is a collection of outtakes of nearly every album track, including never before heard pre-production demo recordings, alternate mixes and arrangements, live material, an Archers of Loaf cover, as well as a newly recorded version of the album track “Caretaker” which was recorded in 2019 on the literal last night in the house Stevenson grew up in, ten years after the song was originally written there.

The album features liner note essays written by musicians Julien Baker and Lucy Dacus who drew early inspiration for their own music and song writing from the album. Also contributing liner notes are Pitchfork, NPR and Stereogum writer Nina Corcoran, as well as long time friend and collaborator Jeff Rosenstock who produced and played guitar on some of the bonus demo material contained in the collection.

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The packaging also features many never before seen studio photos and tour photography from the era in which the album was written, produced and released, and outtakes from the photo session at which the album’s iconic cover artwork was shot. The limited run double-LP Remastered Deluxe Edition set of “Sit Resist” is now available for pre-order via Don Giovanni Records, and will be released on September 4th, 2020. This is a one-time edition, and the limited collection will not be reissued in this current state after the initial pressing sells out.

The Band:

Laura Stevenson – vocals, acoustic and electric guitars, piano, organ
Mike Campbell – bass guitar
Alex Billig – accordion, trumpet
Peter Naddeo – electric guitar, glockenspiel
Chris Parker – drums, percussion

Released September 4th, 2020

2020 Remaster:
All songs by Laura Stevenson

These songs are about mental health and queer struggles. Stand by your friends that are hurting. Harm reduction is the key to safety. Often pinned as a band that has a lot going on,” Teenage Halloween has crafted a sound rooted in abundance. Luke Henderik’s rare and universal lyrics, and the precise ear of engineer Evan Bernard, this newest collection of songs is full of surprises that humbly aims to redefine the modern DIY punk scene.  A joyous vibe of Replacements/Springsteen/The Hold Steady, but young, beautiful and a little punk. It’s short in that good way where you think ‘aaaww, already?’ when it’s over and silence takes over.

Predominantly a gay identifying band, the songs reflect this experience holistically with lyrics that grapple with vulnerability, community, extreme existentialism, mental illness, and gender euphoria. Accompanied by the band’s explosive energy, each song functions as a politically charged anthem. The album maintains constant energy, and that energy also celebrates the bravery of being a queer band. Further, the songs speak in narratives, making sure people are held accountable for their actions and in the same vein, given the opportunity to communicate that self-reflection.

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The self-titled debut album Teenage Halloween was recorded by Bernard in Big Mama’s Recording Studio and will be released by Don Giovanni Records in September. Liberated and alive. You can really tell that they’ve developed their chemistry through hard work in the course of playing hundreds of live shows. I guess it’s just a matter of time now before Teenage Halloween are traveling the globe playing their inspiring songs to the appreciative weirdos, outcasts, and societal rejects of the free-thinking underworld. Exciting, hopeful music for challenging times.

The Band:

Luke Henderiks – guitar / vocals / lyrics / composition
Eli Frank – lead guitar / composition / production
Tricia Marshall- bass / vocals / keys
Brandon Hakim – saxophone
Peter Gargano- drums
Jane Lai – piano
Evan Bernard- tambourine / guitar

Released September 18th, 2020 Don Giovanni Records 2020

Painted Zeros is Katie Lau’s recording project. Her debut full-length album “Floriography” was released 10/30/2015 on Don Giovanni Records, and demonstrates the breadth of her musicality while being unmistakably punk at heart. Lush strings colour the spaces between melodic guitar hooks and Lau’s dreamy (often buried) vocal delivery, offering the listener an intimate look inside a world that echoes the heyday of shoegaze and demands that they listen closely–and loud. Based out of Brooklyn, NY, the band is a trio live, and in concert Lau’s songs burst to life with the help of two of her best friends. Love the fuzzy sound, and the guitar work is wonderful. I wish I had better words to describe how much I enjoy this album. Despite, or maybe because of, the subject matter throughout, this album often feels like the beginnings of a triumphant breakthrough to the other side. 

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Her new album “When You Found Forever”, her first project to be released in five years under the Painted Zeros name. It’s an uncompromising journey into a person stricken with a battle of the psyche, overcoming a tumultuous relationship with alcohol and breaking free from the clutches of an old love (see “”). Lau is fearless in showing the pains of addiction mixed with the beautiful colour palette that returns once its been abandoned. On her latest single that we’re thrilled to premiere, “I Will Try” Lau takes the various shades that make up ourselves to create an anthem endowed with a restored affirmation in her identity and making the best of the future.

Written, performed, engineered, and mixed by Katie Lau

Drums played by Jared Kaner on tracks 3 & 8
Bass played by Jim Hill on tracks 3 & 8

Released May 29th, 2020

AOTY - Bad Moves

Bad Moves’ brand of adolescent angst-fueled power-punk has gone to college, emerging older, wearier, and wiser, while retaining all of its rebellious energy. Aside from some inaudible vocals on the first few tracks, Untenable is a thoughtful, dystopian delight; though that’s no surprise from a band that writes and plays each song like it’s their last.
Bad Moves is four friends making upbeat power-pop about anxiety and identity, drawing on a sound that stretches from forbears like The Nerves and Cheap Trick to contemporary artists like Sheer Mag and Haim. After years knocking around the Washington, D.C. punk scene in bands of their own, guitarists Katie Park and David Combs, bassist Emma Cleveland and drummer Daoud Tyler-Ameen began playing together in 2015, with a few goals in mind: Songwriting would be collaborative, singing would be everyone’s job and arrangements would be generously staggered, blending voices and ideas to avoid centering any one member.
On its self titled 2016 EP, the band explored bleak adulthood, writing about bad jobs, corrupt leaders, frustrated dreams and gentrifying cities. Tours of the US and UK with friends Jeff Rosenstock, Martha, Nana Grizol and The Spook School brought a widening fanbase and a sharpening sound, with new material that dug into the wilderness of childhood and how its lessons ripple out later in life. As anticipation grew for a full-length album, the band made a breakthrough appearance on the Cartoon Network’s Craig of the Creek, voicing their animated selves in an episode about the show’s lead characters putting on their first DIY concert.

“Tell No One”, was released September. 21st, 2018 on Don Giovanni Records, was Bad Moves’ debut LP: 12 songs about confronting old secrets and stumbling into self-discovery, wrapped in a sound that hometown weekly Washington City Paper calls “exuberant catharsis, the type of pop that makes you breathe deep and shout.”

“Untenable”, released June 26th, 2020 on Don Giovanni Records, is the sophomore full-length by Washington, D.C.’s Bad Moves.

Last month, Don Giovanni Records announced that for the first time ever, we’d be issuing a vinyl release of the 2013 long out of print cassette-only recording “Chalk Tape” by Screaming Females. This one-time vinyl pressing would only be made available to order for the limited period of one month. After this Sunday July 26th, the pre-order period will be over, and the vinyl will no longer be available.

Initially released in a limited run of just 100 cassette copies, “Chalk Tape” was available and sold at only one show (at which it sold out immediately) in 2013, which was the first show back for the band after a six-month hiatus from touring and performing. It has not been available in any physical format since then. Pitchfork called the EP “some of the hookiest, most melodic songs Screaming Females have ever recorded” in their original review of the EP.

The EP’s genesis came after an extended period of touring inactivity while guitarist/vocalist Marissa Paternoster was recovering from a severe illness. The band worked on the seven songs that would make up Chalk Tape as a writing and collaboration exercise to keep creative energy fresh, following up 2012’s Steve Albini produced 2xLP Ugly.

Chalk Tape has existed outside the official canon of Screaming Females’ catalogue since its release, though it is a unique document of a band concurrently writing, recording, and performing in real-time and capturing of their songs as they were being created.

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This vinyl run of Chalk Tape is exclusively available for a limited pre-order, and in the spirit of the EP’s initial limited release, will only be available via this pre-order until Sunday July 26th. Vinyl pressing time is unpredictable these days but these are projected to ship in late October/early November.

Screaming Females is a three piece rock band from New Brunswick, New Jersey. We have been writing, recording, and touring with one another for 13 years.

Releases November 9th, 2020

 

Back in 2018, Washington D.C. rockers Bad Moves, who’ve been at it since 2015, among the Washington D.C. bands of the moment. Two years later, their placement on such a list remains more than worthy. They released their punchy debut album Tell No One that year on Don Giovanni Records, which alerted us to their appearance at 2019’s SXSW. Tell No One thrived on shreddy power-pop, and it appears there’ll be plenty more where that came from on Untenable. Bad Moves make music about begrudgingly growing up and then finally treating adulthood like a party. Their punk music may be a protest of boredom itself.

On this record, the band has leaned into the outer edges of their influences, expanding their power-pop umbrella to include hints of folk, garage rock, and ’90s “indie” while still keeping the hooks tuneful and sticky. Lyrically, the band explores the myriad anxieties of modern living

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Out May 29th, Untenable is the sophomore full-length by Washington, D.C.’s Bad Moves. On this record, the band has leaned into the outer edges of their influences, expanding their power-pop umbrella to include hints of folk, garage rock, and ’90s “indie” while still keeping the hooks tuneful and sticky. Lyrically, the band explores the myriad anxieties of modern living — from heady questions of self-definition and identity to day-to-day matters, like labour precarity, climate change, social media, automation and the surveillance state.

Bad MovesUntenable” released Don Giovanni Records

Don Giovanni Records is issuing, for the first time ever, a vinyl release of the 2013 long out of print cassette-only recording “Chalk Tape” by Screaming Females. Pitchfork called the EP “some of the hookiest, most melodic songs Screaming Females have ever recorded” in their original review of the EP. Screaming Females is a three piece rock band from New Brunswick, New Jersey. We have been writing, recording, and touring with one another for 13 years.

Initially released in a limited run of just 100 cassette copies, Chalk Tape was available and sold at only one show (at which it sold out immediately) in 2013, which was the first show back for the band after a six-month hiatus from touring and performing. It has not been available in any physical format since then.

The EP’s genesis came after an extended period of touring inactivity while guitarist/vocalist Marissa Paternoster was recovering from a severe illness. The band worked on the seven songs that would make up Chalk Tape as a writing and collaboration exercise to keep creative energy fresh, following up 2012’s Steve Albini produced 2xLP Ugly.

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Chalk Tape has existed outside the official canon of Screaming Females’ catalogue since its release, though it is a unique document of a band concurrently writing, recording, and performing in real-time and capturing of their songs as they were being created.

This vinyl run of Chalk Tape is now exclusively available for a limited pre-order, and in the spirit of the EP’s initial limited release, will only be available via this pre-order until July 26th. Vinyl pressing time is unpredictable these days but these are projected to ship in late October/early November.

Pitchfork called Chalk Tape “some of the hookiest, most melodic songs Screaming Females have ever recorded” in their original review of the EP.

Initially released in a limited run of just 100 cassette copies, Chalk Tape was available and sold at only one show (at which it sold out immediately) in 2013, which was the first show back for the band after a six-month hiatus from touring and performing. It has not been available in any physical format since then.

Releases November 9th, 2020

This vinyl run of Chalk Tape is now available for a limited pre-order, and in the spirit of the EP’s initial limited release, will only be available to order until July 26th and we are only making as many as pre-ordered. Vinyl pressing time is unpredictable these days but these are projected to ship in late October/early November.

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Bad Moves is four friends making upbeat power-pop about anxiety and identity, drawing on a sound that stretches from forbears like The Nerves and Cheap Trick to contemporary artists like Sheer Mag and Haim. After years knocking around the Washington, D.C. punk scene in bands of their own, guitarists Katie Park and David Combs, bassist Emma Cleveland and drummer Daoud Tyler-Ameen began playing together in 2015, with a few goals in mind: Songwriting would be collaborative, singing would be everyone’s job and arrangements would be generously staggered, blending voices and ideas to avoid centreing any one member.

Back in 2018, D.C. rockers Bad Moves, who’ve been at it since 2015, appeared on our list of the best Washington D.C. bands of the moment. Two years later, their placement on such a list remains more than worthy. They released their punchy debut album Tell No One that year on Don Giovanni, which alerted us to their appearance at 2019’s SXSW. Tell No One thrived on shreddy power-pop, and it appears there’ll be plenty more where that came from on Untenable. Bad Moves make music about begrudgingly growing up and then finally treating adulthood like a party. Their punk music may be a protest of boredom itself.

Pre-Order Untenable on Don Giovanni Records

Screaming Females are releasing a collection of their “complete non-album recordings, ”Singles Too”, on Don Giovanni Records. They share “Pretty Okay,” from their 2008 split 7″ with Full of Fancy. Originally out October 18th, “Singles Too” collects Screaming Females’ complete non-album recordings, gathering together early 7” singles, digital-only b-sides, and one pretty great remix. The download and CD will also feature six cover songs, including the New Jersey trio’s takes on music by Neil Young, Taylor Swift, Sheryl Crow, and Patti Smith. The vinyl version of the album will be a one-time pressing limited to 1500 copies.

The tracklist also provides a roadmap of the band’s progress through 15+ years of music-making — tracking Screaming Females from their early days playing New Brunswick basement shows into life as a full-time band with a tour schedule rigorous enough that their van earned its own New York Times profile.

“On the first single we ever put out, there were mistakes that I made playing guitar that make me want to crawl into a hole and die,” says guitarist Marissa Paternoster, recalling the sessions for “Arm Over Arm” and “Zoo of Death.” “At the time I didn’t know I was allowed to say, ‘Can I do that again and correct it? I was 19, giving it my all.” On Singles Too, you can hear Screaming Females lay it down at Milltown, NJ’s post-apocalyptic recording-on-a-budget one-stop, The Hunt — tin roof, flammable mixing board, DIY growlab housed in back of Marshall cab — AND at posh Los Angeles hit-factory, East West Studios, where they convened with members of Garbage to cover “Because the Night.”

The b-sides included here also capture the breadth of the trio’s creativity, with compelling detours and tangents otherwise unrepresented in their catalogue, from Sammus and Moor Mother’s re-work of “End of My Bloodline” to the stripped down demo of Rose Mountain’s “Hopeless.” Singles Too is a rarities comp, but it’s a compelling one — a deep dive into SF ephemera, an introduction, and a history lesson all at once.

Formed in 2005, Screaming Females are Marissa Paternoster (guitar), Mike Abbate (bass), and Jarrett Dougherty (drums). They have released seven full-length albums and toured across the world.

released October 18, 2019

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Listening to Mal Blum’s music, you might grow a bit jealous of the people who get to actually hang with the singer/songwriter in real life. Thanks to their wry one-liners and their ability to create joyful sounds out of relentless self-scrutiny, it’s easy to picture Blum sliding up to brunch or a beach day dispensing a fluid mix of slightly weird yet perceptive jokes and deep insights about the endless struggle to understand oneself and others. These registers—humor and world-weary musing—converge on Blum’s latest record Pity Boy, bringing levity to songs about mental health, the limited resources we have to care for one another, and the grace to be found in taking responsibility for hurting others. Even when Blum’s themes shade darker, the music allows slants of brightness to permeate the gloom and offers frequent opportunities to jump up, dance around, and forget whatever problem might have initially inspired a song.

Opening track “Things Still Left to Say” summarizes what distinguishes Blum’s music from others working at the nexus of punk, pop, and confessional songwriting: specifically, Blum’s ability to diffuse difficult thoughts with humor (“Should I explain myself? / I’d rather read the dictionary!”) and their fascination with the metaphysical gap between one’s presence among others and one’s internal experience of that togetherness. “Do you miss me when I’m not around?” Blum sings, “Because you don’t see me when I’m here”.

In their refrains, Blum’s songs often rely on repetition but not in a way that grows annoying or rote. Rather, the strategy lets Blum turn a thought over and over, drawing different meanings out of it. The refrain on “Things Still Left to Say” goes, “I’ve got things still left to say / I’ve got phrases, I’ve got phrases”—and the contrast between the colloquial construction “I’ve got” and the pretentious word “phrases” strikes a somewhat hilarious, self-deprecating tone. Through this choice, the refrain both mocks the self-indulgent impulse to express oneself and insists on its importance. Blum never specifies what “things” they have to say, but that evasion is exactly the point. Sometimes we feel moved to speak but don’t quite know what to say.

Pity Boy is the first album that Blum recorded with their longtime touring band, The Blums, which includes Audrey Zee Whitesides on guitar, Barrett Lindgren on bass, and Ricardo Lagomasino on drums. The Blums contributed substantially to the arrangements here and created teflon-tight musical structures to shape Blum’s occasionally wordy writing. On “Things Still Left to Say,” for example, Lagomasino and Lindgren create a foot-stomping backbeat while Whitesides sprays arcing guitar riffs like rainbow confetti all over the melody. The song feels engineered to inspire head-bobbing; it’s almost impossible to take the ride without moving some part of your body along.

Pity Boy’s other tracks cleave into two fairly distinct sonic categories: cathartic pop-punk bliss and downtempo DIY acoustics. “Odds,” “I Don’t Want To” and “Gotta Go” exemplify the former through fast tempos, peppy power chords, and Blum’s slightly attitudinal delivery, recalling the adolescent paradox of raising a middle finger to the world while secretly stewing in insecurity. These songs hit a sweet spot between Green Day’s guilty-pleasure ear candy and the introspective, political observations made by Blum’s punk-leaning labelmates at Don Giovanni Records.

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On its face, “I Don’t Want To” appears to be an anti-adulting anthem: a declaration of resistance to the tasks we must do to keep our lives on track under capitalism even if, like Blum, we don’t want to. Closer inspection reveals a confrontation with a friend who’s leveled up in the game of life, engaging in bourgeois activities (“You do yoga / And you don’t feel complicated about it”) and hitting their financial marks (“Pay your bills on time / Not month-to-month like some other guys”) with aggravating precision. As elsewhere, Blum deploys the musical syntax of fuck-you punk to sublimate their self doubt, as lines like this creep in: “I’ll never be like that / I can’t tell you why.” If you feel like blasting the song while doing something other than opening your mail, then Blum is giving you permission to go for it.

The second category of songs harkens back to Blum’s earlier, quieter compositions, turning down the feedback and softening the rhythm section to showcase poetic observations. “Splinter,” “Black Coffee” and “Salt Flats” all deserve a close listen, but “See Me” stands out among this group. “I don’t belong, though it helps to play along,” Blum sings, capturing a feeling that resonates between two valences of experience: the common suspicion of not fitting in and Blum’s own identity as a non-binary transgender individual in a cis-normative society. Blum may well have written the song before the Trump administration launched its assault on the civil rights of transgender people, but in its current context, Blum’s repeated plea of “Why can’t you see me when I’m right here?” insists on visibility not just in an interpersonal sense, but also at a crucial juncture in American political life. On album closer “Maybe I’ll Wait,” Blum acknowledges how their self-protective tendencies—whether stemming from brain chemistry or being hurt by others—sometimes lead to letting people down. “I’ve been trying to be better / Since I’ve known what better was,” Blum admits. Pity Boy offers both the comfort and joy of spending 38 minutes in Blum’s forthright yet mercifully light-hearted presence as they navigate how to speak politically in 2019 and try to be a better friend.

releases July 12th, 2019

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