Posts Tagged ‘Don Giovanni Records’

Image may contain: 4 people, people standing

Bad Moves’ brand of adolescent angst-fueled power-punk has gone to college, emerging older, wearier, and wiser, while retaining all of its rebellious energy. Aside from some inaudible vocals on the first few tracks, Untenable is a thoughtful, dystopian delight; though that’s no surprise from a band that writes and plays each song like it’s their last.
Bad Moves is four friends making upbeat power-pop about anxiety and identity, drawing on a sound that stretches from forbears like The Nerves and Cheap Trick to contemporary artists like Sheer Mag and Haim. After years knocking around the Washington, D.C. punk scene in bands of their own, guitarists Katie Park and David Combs, bassist Emma Cleveland and drummer Daoud Tyler-Ameen began playing together in 2015, with a few goals in mind: Songwriting would be collaborative, singing would be everyone’s job and arrangements would be generously staggered, blending voices and ideas to avoid centering any one member.
On its self titled 2016 EP, the band explored bleak adulthood, writing about bad jobs, corrupt leaders, frustrated dreams and gentrifying cities. Tours of the US and UK with friends Jeff Rosenstock, Martha, Nana Grizol and The Spook School brought a widening fanbase and a sharpening sound, with new material that dug into the wilderness of childhood and how its lessons ripple out later in life. As anticipation grew for a full-length album, the band made a breakthrough appearance on the Cartoon Network’s Craig of the Creek, voicing their animated selves in an episode about the show’s lead characters putting on their first DIY concert.
“Tell No One”, was released September. 21st, 2018 on Don Giovanni Records, was Bad Moves’ debut LP: 12 songs about confronting old secrets and stumbling into self-discovery, wrapped in a sound that hometown weekly Washington City Paper calls “exuberant catharsis, the type of pop that makes you breathe deep and shout.”

“Untenable”, released June 26th, 2020 on Don Giovanni Records, is the sophomore full-length by Washington, D.C.’s Bad Moves.

Last month, Don Giovanni Records announced that for the first time ever, we’d be issuing a vinyl release of the 2013 long out of print cassette-only recording “Chalk Tape” by Screaming Females. This one-time vinyl pressing would only be made available to order for the limited period of one month. After this Sunday July 26th, the pre-order period will be over, and the vinyl will no longer be available.

Initially released in a limited run of just 100 cassette copies, “Chalk Tape” was available and sold at only one show (at which it sold out immediately) in 2013, which was the first show back for the band after a six-month hiatus from touring and performing. It has not been available in any physical format since then. Pitchfork called the EP “some of the hookiest, most melodic songs Screaming Females have ever recorded” in their original review of the EP.

The EP’s genesis came after an extended period of touring inactivity while guitarist/vocalist Marissa Paternoster was recovering from a severe illness. The band worked on the seven songs that would make up Chalk Tape as a writing and collaboration exercise to keep creative energy fresh, following up 2012’s Steve Albini produced 2xLP Ugly.

Chalk Tape has existed outside the official canon of Screaming Females’ catalogue since its release, though it is a unique document of a band concurrently writing, recording, and performing in real-time and capturing of their songs as they were being created.

http://

This vinyl run of Chalk Tape is exclusively available for a limited pre-order, and in the spirit of the EP’s initial limited release, will only be available via this pre-order until Sunday July 26th. Vinyl pressing time is unpredictable these days but these are projected to ship in late October/early November.

Screaming Females is a three piece rock band from New Brunswick, New Jersey. We have been writing, recording, and touring with one another for 13 years.

Releases November 9th, 2020

 

Back in 2018, Washington D.C. rockers Bad Moves, who’ve been at it since 2015, among the Washington D.C. bands of the moment. Two years later, their placement on such a list remains more than worthy. They released their punchy debut album Tell No One that year on Don Giovanni Records, which alerted us to their appearance at 2019’s SXSW. Tell No One thrived on shreddy power-pop, and it appears there’ll be plenty more where that came from on Untenable. Bad Moves make music about begrudgingly growing up and then finally treating adulthood like a party. Their punk music may be a protest of boredom itself.

On this record, the band has leaned into the outer edges of their influences, expanding their power-pop umbrella to include hints of folk, garage rock, and ’90s “indie” while still keeping the hooks tuneful and sticky. Lyrically, the band explores the myriad anxieties of modern living

.

Out May 29th, Untenable is the sophomore full-length by Washington, D.C.’s Bad Moves. On this record, the band has leaned into the outer edges of their influences, expanding their power-pop umbrella to include hints of folk, garage rock, and ’90s “indie” while still keeping the hooks tuneful and sticky. Lyrically, the band explores the myriad anxieties of modern living — from heady questions of self-definition and identity to day-to-day matters, like labour precarity, climate change, social media, automation and the surveillance state.

Bad MovesUntenable” released Don Giovanni Records

Don Giovanni Records is issuing, for the first time ever, a vinyl release of the 2013 long out of print cassette-only recording “Chalk Tape” by Screaming Females. Pitchfork called the EP “some of the hookiest, most melodic songs Screaming Females have ever recorded” in their original review of the EP. Screaming Females is a three piece rock band from New Brunswick, New Jersey. We have been writing, recording, and touring with one another for 13 years.

Initially released in a limited run of just 100 cassette copies, Chalk Tape was available and sold at only one show (at which it sold out immediately) in 2013, which was the first show back for the band after a six-month hiatus from touring and performing. It has not been available in any physical format since then.

The EP’s genesis came after an extended period of touring inactivity while guitarist/vocalist Marissa Paternoster was recovering from a severe illness. The band worked on the seven songs that would make up Chalk Tape as a writing and collaboration exercise to keep creative energy fresh, following up 2012’s Steve Albini produced 2xLP Ugly.

http://

Chalk Tape has existed outside the official canon of Screaming Females’ catalogue since its release, though it is a unique document of a band concurrently writing, recording, and performing in real-time and capturing of their songs as they were being created.

This vinyl run of Chalk Tape is now exclusively available for a limited pre-order, and in the spirit of the EP’s initial limited release, will only be available via this pre-order until July 26th. Vinyl pressing time is unpredictable these days but these are projected to ship in late October/early November.

Pitchfork called Chalk Tape “some of the hookiest, most melodic songs Screaming Females have ever recorded” in their original review of the EP.

Initially released in a limited run of just 100 cassette copies, Chalk Tape was available and sold at only one show (at which it sold out immediately) in 2013, which was the first show back for the band after a six-month hiatus from touring and performing. It has not been available in any physical format since then.

Releases November 9th, 2020

This vinyl run of Chalk Tape is now available for a limited pre-order, and in the spirit of the EP’s initial limited release, will only be available to order until July 26th and we are only making as many as pre-ordered. Vinyl pressing time is unpredictable these days but these are projected to ship in late October/early November.

Image may contain: 4 people, people sitting

Bad Moves is four friends making upbeat power-pop about anxiety and identity, drawing on a sound that stretches from forbears like The Nerves and Cheap Trick to contemporary artists like Sheer Mag and Haim. After years knocking around the Washington, D.C. punk scene in bands of their own, guitarists Katie Park and David Combs, bassist Emma Cleveland and drummer Daoud Tyler-Ameen began playing together in 2015, with a few goals in mind: Songwriting would be collaborative, singing would be everyone’s job and arrangements would be generously staggered, blending voices and ideas to avoid centreing any one member.

Back in 2018, D.C. rockers Bad Moves, who’ve been at it since 2015, appeared on our list of the best Washington D.C. bands of the moment. Two years later, their placement on such a list remains more than worthy. They released their punchy debut album Tell No One that year on Don Giovanni, which alerted us to their appearance at 2019’s SXSW. Tell No One thrived on shreddy power-pop, and it appears there’ll be plenty more where that came from on Untenable. Bad Moves make music about begrudgingly growing up and then finally treating adulthood like a party. Their punk music may be a protest of boredom itself.

Pre-Order Untenable on Don Giovanni Records

Image may contain: 3 people, people smiling, people sitting and indoor

Listening to Mal Blum’s music, you might grow a bit jealous of the people who get to actually hang with the singer/songwriter in real life. Thanks to their wry one-liners and their ability to create joyful sounds out of relentless self-scrutiny, it’s easy to picture Blum sliding up to brunch or a beach day dispensing a fluid mix of slightly weird yet perceptive jokes and deep insights about the endless struggle to understand oneself and others. These registers—humor and world-weary musing—converge on Blum’s latest record Pity Boy, bringing levity to songs about mental health, the limited resources we have to care for one another, and the grace to be found in taking responsibility for hurting others. Even when Blum’s themes shade darker, the music allows slants of brightness to permeate the gloom and offers frequent opportunities to jump up, dance around, and forget whatever problem might have initially inspired a song.

Opening track “Things Still Left to Say” summarizes what distinguishes Blum’s music from others working at the nexus of punk, pop, and confessional songwriting: specifically, Blum’s ability to diffuse difficult thoughts with humor (“Should I explain myself? / I’d rather read the dictionary!”) and their fascination with the metaphysical gap between one’s presence among others and one’s internal experience of that togetherness. “Do you miss me when I’m not around?” Blum sings, “Because you don’t see me when I’m here”.

In their refrains, Blum’s songs often rely on repetition but not in a way that grows annoying or rote. Rather, the strategy lets Blum turn a thought over and over, drawing different meanings out of it. The refrain on “Things Still Left to Say” goes, “I’ve got things still left to say / I’ve got phrases, I’ve got phrases”—and the contrast between the colloquial construction “I’ve got” and the pretentious word “phrases” strikes a somewhat hilarious, self-deprecating tone. Through this choice, the refrain both mocks the self-indulgent impulse to express oneself and insists on its importance. Blum never specifies what “things” they have to say, but that evasion is exactly the point. Sometimes we feel moved to speak but don’t quite know what to say.

Pity Boy is the first album that Blum recorded with their longtime touring band, The Blums, which includes Audrey Zee Whitesides on guitar, Barrett Lindgren on bass, and Ricardo Lagomasino on drums. The Blums contributed substantially to the arrangements here and created teflon-tight musical structures to shape Blum’s occasionally wordy writing. On “Things Still Left to Say,” for example, Lagomasino and Lindgren create a foot-stomping backbeat while Whitesides sprays arcing guitar riffs like rainbow confetti all over the melody. The song feels engineered to inspire head-bobbing; it’s almost impossible to take the ride without moving some part of your body along.

Pity Boy’s other tracks cleave into two fairly distinct sonic categories: cathartic pop-punk bliss and downtempo DIY acoustics. “Odds,” “I Don’t Want To” and “Gotta Go” exemplify the former through fast tempos, peppy power chords, and Blum’s slightly attitudinal delivery, recalling the adolescent paradox of raising a middle finger to the world while secretly stewing in insecurity. These songs hit a sweet spot between Green Day’s guilty-pleasure ear candy and the introspective, political observations made by Blum’s punk-leaning labelmates at Don Giovanni Records.

http://

On its face, “I Don’t Want To” appears to be an anti-adulting anthem: a declaration of resistance to the tasks we must do to keep our lives on track under capitalism even if, like Blum, we don’t want to. Closer inspection reveals a confrontation with a friend who’s leveled up in the game of life, engaging in bourgeois activities (“You do yoga / And you don’t feel complicated about it”) and hitting their financial marks (“Pay your bills on time / Not month-to-month like some other guys”) with aggravating precision. As elsewhere, Blum deploys the musical syntax of fuck-you punk to sublimate their self doubt, as lines like this creep in: “I’ll never be like that / I can’t tell you why.” If you feel like blasting the song while doing something other than opening your mail, then Blum is giving you permission to go for it.

The second category of songs harkens back to Blum’s earlier, quieter compositions, turning down the feedback and softening the rhythm section to showcase poetic observations. “Splinter,” “Black Coffee” and “Salt Flats” all deserve a close listen, but “See Me” stands out among this group. “I don’t belong, though it helps to play along,” Blum sings, capturing a feeling that resonates between two valences of experience: the common suspicion of not fitting in and Blum’s own identity as a non-binary transgender individual in a cis-normative society. Blum may well have written the song before the Trump administration launched its assault on the civil rights of transgender people, but in its current context, Blum’s repeated plea of “Why can’t you see me when I’m right here?” insists on visibility not just in an interpersonal sense, but also at a crucial juncture in American political life. On album closer “Maybe I’ll Wait,” Blum acknowledges how their self-protective tendencies—whether stemming from brain chemistry or being hurt by others—sometimes lead to letting people down. “I’ve been trying to be better / Since I’ve known what better was,” Blum admits. Pity Boy offers both the comfort and joy of spending 38 minutes in Blum’s forthright yet mercifully light-hearted presence as they navigate how to speak politically in 2019 and try to be a better friend.

releases July 12th, 2019

Image may contain: text

Bad Moves

Long live power-pop! I can’t get enough of that spry, shreddy sound, and Washington D.C.’s Bad Moves put their own superb punk spin on it. Their debut LP, Tell No One, is heaps of fun, even as these four friends sing about the mundanity of young adulthood, failed relationships and the long arm of childhood. But these part-time punks make it all sound like a hoopla as opposed to a drag, churning out the cathartic, jubilant kind of rock ‘n’ roll that never goes out of style

Last fall, DC punks Bad Moves released their debut LP Tell No One on Don Giovanni Records, and they’ve now made a video for its song “Wishing.” The video was made by co-lead-singer David Combs (also of Spoonboy, The Max Levine Ensemble, and SOMNIA), who tells us:

The song “Wishing” is about the expectations that adults project onto children, and the music video is made up of some old footage I took a few years ago of my then 2 year old housemate dressed as the Grim Reaper. She’s 5 now and when I asked her if I could use the footage, she said “yeah, I don’t need it anymore.”

David’s description should give you a good idea of what to expect from this hazy video, which pairs well with the song, which is one of the calmer songs on the album.

From the Bad Moves tape on Don Giovanni Records.

Image may contain: 3 people, child

After three years on the road, the New York singer Mal Blum returns with a refreshing directness, a hungry turtle and “Things Still Left To Say.” In their first new song since the 2015 album You Look a Lot Like Me, Blum confronts an estranged relationship where so much has been left unresolved. Though hard, Blum stresses the importance of being truthful, especially while “we’re all still here.”

The upbeat, punk-pop power chords and infectious lyrics are accompanied appropriately by a karaoke-style video. Along with the neon pink and blue text stretching across the screen with every line, a montage of clips shows people dancing and singing into the camera to “Things Still Left To Say.” In the background, Blum is laid out in a plant-filled living room, feeding lettuce to a turtle. Vibrant and liberating in all it’s awkward glory, what shines through is Blum’s signature, self-effacing honesty.

“‘Things Still Left To Say’ is a song about the desire and persistence to be heard,” Blum tells us in an email. “About times when we swallow or deflect vulnerable aspects of ourselves because we feel that there is no space for them. This song is about navigating that distance, the specific flavor of isolation (so awkward that it’s almost comical) that occurs when you feel unknown in front of those who think that they know you the best.”

Blum repeats a kind of mantra in the chorus, “There are thing still left to say / I’ve got phrases / I’ve got phrases.” It’s a reminder to keep those words close, just in case you get a chance to set them free.

“Things Still Left To Say”is out now on Don Giovanni Records, and Blum will be back on tour with Lucy Dacus and Fenne Lily in March.

I am so happy to (finally) announce that my new album, “The Big Freeze” is out on March 29th! You can hear the first single “Living Room NY” . Laura Stevenson’s music has always dealt in crushing existential dread, be it self-deprecation or heartache. This is an artist who once opened a 2015 song called “Jellyfish” with “I’m fucking hideous and spiteful / When I’m left to my devices.” Even the press release for her new album opens with: “If gravity is strong enough, at the end of time our universe will collapse, pulling all of existence back down to infinitesimal size, like before the Big Bang. But if expansion outpaces gravity, eventually the universe will be cold and empty – all light, heat, and connection will be gone.” That phenomenon of a too cold, uninhabitable universe is called The Big Freeze, which is also the title of Stevenson’s upcoming fifth LP that’s out 29 March.

The New York songwriter is back with her fifth album, ‘The Big Freeze,’ out 29th March.

Image result for izzy true

Sad Bad is the second full-length by Izzy True. It’s a record about death and getting dumped at the end of the world. The songs were mostly written in Chicago in an apartment on the 11th floor of a tall building that would eventually turn out to have bedbugs and to which Izzy True can no longer return because it is no longer rented by people they love. That music was then carried back to upstate New York where it was subjected to TOTAL INSTRUMENTATION courtesy of the True’s dear friends and collaborators, Angela Devivo and Kyra Skye. The is available now digitally and also as a pack of stickers (designed by True) with a complimentary download code. Bless this mess.

Isabel Reidy began her career in The Realbads, a folk noise punk band with her brother Silas Reidy on guitar, percussionist Chris Polis, and bassist Mike Amadeo. Their full­ length album Here Comes The Realbads was released on Sweet Baby God Records in 2014. On her recent solo project, Izzy True, Reidy pursues a wistful and empowering punch of melodic pop rock.

The humor and charm of Izzy True is reflected in the animated music video for “Swole,” the debut track from her new EP, Troll. “Swole,” short for “swollen,” is gym slang for someone who has developed a larger physique from weightlifting. Reidy deadpans about her workout routine, getting huge, and how it gets her dates.

Reidy has also illustrated and published numerous comics, including “Powder Shiver”, which was released at the Chicago Alternative Comics Expo, and on “Swole”, she accompanies her inventive songwriting with animations of eccentric characters: a crocodile in gym shorts, a jubilant man lifting weights and a bizarre creature making a protein shake.

Riedy elaborates on the process of combing songwriting with illustrating:

“It all kind of feeds into itself. I write songs about my characters and I also sometimes try to write music that sounds how my images look. The music, the dudes, they all exist in the same universe, it’s just different ways of seeing that place. As for the content­­ Those are just some of my guys, new and old, and they are working out. I’ve been trying to work out, so that’s why they’re doing it. I want them to be strong. It would be cool to be strong”.

Troll is on Don Giovanni Records.