Posts Tagged ‘Washington’

This is the third full release from Seattle’s Meagan Grandall, a project now 10 years old. A sweeping, symphonic expression of loss and the ache that comes with it, I have listened to this album this year at home, and in my car at the loudest possible volume while in the worst possible mood. Lemolo has been with me for many years now as a favorite, but Swansea was there for me this year. Another great collection of captivating dream pop from Meagan Grandall. The lush sounds and production are warm and welcoming, with intelligent arrangements full of varied instrumentation that never fails to impress..

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Meagan Grandall: Vocals, Guitar, Piano, Synth, Bass, Violin, and Vibraphone
Nathan Yaccino: Drums, Percussion, Guitar, Bass, Cello, and Vibraphone
Alex Guy: Violin and Viola
Maria Scherer Wilson: Cello
Jon Karschney: French Horn

released October 11th, 2019

All songs written by Meagan Grandall ,Lemolo is the Seattle dream pop project of songwriter and multi-instrumentalist.

Like many important bands, Seattle quartet Versing got their start in college radio—Tacoma’s KUPS. The group’s main songwriter/guitarist/vocalist Daniel Salas served as alternative music director there, where he met guitarist Graham Baker, drummer Max Keyes, and bassist Kirby Lochner. Now Versing are poised to spread their coolly combustible brand of rock on those said airwaves…and beyond if the world knows what’s good for it.

Baker, Keyes, Lochner, and Salas have risen through Seattle’s competitive rock ecosphere with nonchalant élan. They cheekily titled a previous album Nirvana, but never mind the bleach: Versing isn’t emulating Sub Pop’s most famous artist. Rather, these four twenty-something aesthetes are forging an exciting sound that finds a golden mean between lustrous noise and ebullient melody.

“Tethered” is the lead-off single from Versing’s full-length album “10000”, out May 3rd 2019 on Hardly Art records.

With Versing, songwriting is obviously crucial, but much of the pleasure in 10000 comes from its guitar textures. They’re swarming, yet also spiky and agile. Gently chiding the Seattle music scene’s self-seriousness while acknowledging Versing’s playfulness and irony, Salas says, “There’s a ‘let’s just fuck around and see what comes out,’ aspect of what we do, which I think is uncommon for Seattle bands.”

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Versing’s freewheeling attitude has paradoxically resulted in 10000, an engrossing album that’s impossible to feel ambivalent about.

Released May 3rd, 2019

A product of the burgeoning Washington, D.C. punk scene, Gauche fill their songs with the kind of biting political commentary you’d expect from a group making music in the shadow of the White House. “Pay Day” is an unsparing look at wage inequality; on “History,” Mary Jane Regalado vents her rage at seeing her accomplishments stolen by men who take the credit. But like the equally political post-punk groups of the late ’70s, Gauche also know that dancing can itself be a weapon. Accordingly, the group employs bouncy sax, tense bass lines, and riotous yelps—conjuring the B-52s, Le Tigre, and Essential Logic in one manic package.

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released July 12th, 2019

Jason P. Barnett: Guitar, Bass, Vocals
Adrienne CN Berry: Saxophone, Vocals
Mary Jane Regalado: Vocals, Bass, Guitar
Pearie Sol: Keyboards
Laurie Spector: Bass, Drums
Daniele Yandel: Vocals, Drums, Bass, Guitar

There’s a lot of pedigree behind the band Gauche — its members are also in Downtown Boys and Priests — so maybe it’s not too surprising that their debut album, A People’s History Of Gauche, absolutely goes off, but so it does. They’re a young band that has a sense of legacy, willing to engage with punk music on a continuum, and each song feels like a treatise on what it means to be screaming and singing about the same injustices for decades while the status quo remains the same.

Washington, DC’s Gauche release A People’s History of Gauche, a collective catharsis of anger, frustration, and trauma through creativity. Gauche find their agency and joy through creating and performing music together in 36 minutes of groove-filled power punk. When asked about the genesis of the title of their Merge Records debut, Recorded with Austin Brown (Parquet Courts) and Robert Szmurlo in Brooklyn, NY, and with Jonah Takagi (Ex Hex) in DC, A People’s History of Gauche marks the first time the band worked with people outside of their ranks, resulting in a fuller sound that boasts more intricate instrumentation. From the very first line of album opener Flash – Gauche are here to compel us to dance while singing along about society’s universal struggles.

Gauche, Washington D.C.’s frantic, elastic, bombastic, ecstatic, anti-capitalist, anti-racist feminist jam band.

“A People’s History of Gauche,” out now on Merge Records. released July 12th 2019

Lisa Prank is a true-blue romantic. In fact, “I’m very preoccupied with romance,” songwriter Robin Edwards admits. On her second full-length for Father/Daughter Records, Perfect Love Song, Edwards acknowledges the ultimate joke of love: that there is no perfect, so you’ll get tripped up while chasing it—but what else could possibly be more rich, more exhilarating, more everything, skinned knees be damned? Stitching together pop-punk panache and pillow talk introspection, Perfect Love Song finds Lisa Prank not in pursuit of the flawless impossible, as the title may suggest. Rather, she’s interested in the entire experience of love and learning through it. “I never learned how to get mad,” Edwards sings on the reflective “Get Mad”—but she did learn how to write totally gratifying pop songs about it. Perfect Love Song is an album that takes a soft-focus gaze at romance’s sharpest points and edges, both the exciting peaks and the scary cliffs.

As Edwards was navigating a drawn out, Lifetime-movie level heartbreak, she found herself drifting back towards the home she had in her friendships. She moved back into her old room in storied Seattle punk house, Spruce House, sharing a door with Tacocat’s Bree McKenna (who’s also her bandmate, along with Julia Shapiro, in the supergroup Who Is She?). She’d knock and ask McKenna for feedback on songs, who wound up playing bass on the record. To produce, Edwards tapped close friend and indie pop legend Rose Melberg of Tiger Trap, The Softies, and Go Sailor. Melberg’s artistic alignment and personal closeness to Edwards gave her near psychic insight into Lisa Prank’s sonic goals, but at enough remove to provide breakthroughs to Edwards at stuck points (Melberg also co-wrote “Telescope,” and sang harmonies on several tracks). It was a collaboration that felt like coaching, leading her achieve her ideal polished-punk sound, alongside Ian LeSage who engineered and mixed the record at the Vault Studios. Recording was fun, too. Friends were around, creating the kind of lighthearted, mutually supportive feeling one needs surrounding them feel like themselves again after retrieving their heart back from a breakup. Lisa Prank’s last record, Adult Teen, used a Roland MC-505 drum machine, for Perfect Love Song, she traded it in for real life drummer, Tom Fitzgibbon.

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Writing Perfect Love Song was Edwards’ opportunity “to personally say all the things that I wanted to say, or wish I had said.” In “Scream the Truth,” a gaslighting extinguisher anthem about reclaiming your sanity, she gets to be mad on her terms: “I wasn’t losing my mind,” she sings. Says Edwards, “it’s about being frustrated seeing someone else navigate the world as a very surface-level nice person who is performatively feminist and social-justice minded, but knowing the truth of how they treat people in their personal life.” The opening track, “Rodeo,” likens the searing, sinking-in feeling of a post-fight realization—“‘cause ‘I don’t wanna be in love’/means I don’t wanna be in love/with you”—to the dangers and desires of the spectacle of love. “By now I know/this is the rodeo I chose,” she sings, electing to get back on her horse and ride, acknowledging the pain that’s part of that game.

“I wish a different emotion was so alive and exciting to me,” Edwards laughs, “but love is just the one that feels so visceral and consuming.” Perfect Love Song explodes the roller coaster snapshots of romance in bursts of poppy neon bright color, with Edwards’ cheeky perspective polished to full pop-punk shine. And the mission of that genre, one could argue, is to keep on bopping along through the bullshit of life. To stay buoyant, to find fun in the big what-ifs and whatevers. It what keeps the dream Lisa Prank afloat: as she sings on “Constellations,” “still I keep on hoping this is some perfect love song/and we’ll go on and on and on, and on and on, and on.”

released October 4th, 2019

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We visited the KEXP studios for the second time last July and this time we gotta meet Cheryl Waters!!! The video is now live, check it out!

check out their studio work, which is more polished! If you like more straightforward/hardcore punk, maybe try their earlier EPs. If you like moody, gloomy, and aggressive post-punk, try their debut album (which I love). Their latest record heads in a more new-wavey direction and contains the four songs in this performance. They’re very charismatic and energetic live,

Priests performing live in the KEXP studio. Recorded July 3rd, 2019.

Band Members
Daniele, Katie & GL

Songs: I’m Clean 68 Screen Control Freak Jesus’ Son

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In October 2008, Mount Eerie and Canadian singer-songwriter Julie Doiron released a collaborative album called Lost Wisdom. They are now releasing its sequel: Lost Wisdom pt. 2 is out November 8th via Mount Eerie’s label P.W. Elverum & Sun.  listen to their new song “Love Without Possession.”

Mount Eerie and Julie Doiron are to play shows together this December. According to a press release, those concerts will “likely be the only performance of this album’s material for the foreseeable future.”

In a statement, Phil Elverum discussed the themes and intentions of the new record. He refers to the death of his wife, the artist Geneviève Castrée, which inspired his last two studio albums, 2017’s A Crow Looked at Me and 2018’s Now Only. He also alludes to his marriage to Michelle Williams and their separation earlier this year. “Finding myself staring into another fire, disoriented by the changes, these songs came out,” he wrote.

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Elverum continued, “I tried to make songs that did not rely at all on who I am or who I am singing about,” adding, “Knowing that anyone with internet access might have questions about my specifics, I don’t want to say anything personal that isn’t already in the songs. My fingers are crossed that when I push them out to sea they will be met with calm humane understanding. That’s what they’re about after all.”

A split single five years in the making featuring the lead vocals of Kathleen Wilson (see also The Hall Monitors). First, Jake Starr & The Delicious Fullness show Dusty Springfield’s “Little By Little” no mercy with Jake delivering the low vox to Kathleen’s wail. Then on the flip, Thee Lexington Arrows rip through “Gimme Shelter”–surely the inheritors to Merry Clayton’s fantastic solo version! 300 total pressed with 200 on milky clear vinyl and 100 on black vinyl. After fronting Washington DC garage rockers Adam West for nearly 17 years, soft-spoken, mild-mannered Jake Starr took time off to recharge his batteries. Now he’s back to deliver high-octane, garage rock-n-roll 

“Little By Little” originally performed by Dusty Springfield 

Kathleen Wilson: Lead and backing vox, guitar • Nathaniel Osgood: Drums • Louie Newmyer: Bass • Sean Crowley: Guitar • Jake Starr: Backing throat, tambourine.

released April 26th, 2019 Jake Starr & The Delicious Fullness

Lisa Prank is a true blue romantic. In fact, “I’m very preoccupied with romance,” songwriter Robin Edwards admits, “and I’m always trying to figure out what the deal with love is.” On her new record, “Perfect Love Song”, Edwards acknowledges the ultimate joke of love: that there is no perfect, so you’ll get tripped up while chasing it but what else could possibly be more rich, more exhilarating, more everything, skinned knees be damned? Stitching together pop punk panache and pillow talk introspection, Perfect Love Song finds Lisa Prank not in pursuit of the
flawless impossible, as the title may suggest. Rather, she’s interested in the entire experience of love and learning through it. “I never learned how to be mad,” Edwards sings on the reflective “Get Mad” but she did learn how to write totally gratifying pop songs about it, with the end of “processing my feelings, and hoping that other people can relate if they’ve been in a similar situation.” Perfect Love Song is an album that takes a soft focus gaze at romance’s sharpest points and edges, both the exciting peaks and the scary cliffs.As Edwards was navigating a drawn out, Lifetime movie level heartbreak, she found herself drifting back towards the home she had in her friendships. She moved back into her old room in storied Seattle punk manse, Spruce House, sharing a door with Tacocat’s Bree McKenna. She’d knock and ask McKenna for feedback on songs, who wound up playing guitar on the record. To produce, Edwards tapped old friend Rose Melberg of Tiger Trap. Melberg’s artistic alignment and personal closeness to Edwards gave her near psychic insight into Lisa Prank’s sonic goals,
but at enough remove to provide breakthroughs to Edwards at stuck points. It was a collaboration that felt like coaching. She helped Edwards step back and look at harmonies, percussion, guitar tones she may have not considered at first, but that helped her achieve her ideal polished punk sound.

Plus, it was fun in the studio, with friends around, creating the kind of lighthearted, mutually supportive feeling one needs surrounding them feel like themselves again after retrieving their heart back from a breakup.

“I love love songs, or falling out of love songs,” explains Edwards, “where I can see one moment of the situation and know what the whole story is.” Writing Perfect Love Song was Edwards’ opportunity “to personally say all the things that I wanted to say, or wish I had said.” In “Scream the Truth,” a gaslighting extinguisher anthem about reclaiming your sanity, she gets to be mad on her terms: “I wasn’t losing my mind,” she sings. Says Edwards, “its about seeing someone else navigate the world as a very nice guy whose very woke and feminist or whatever, and knowing the truth about him.” The first track, “Rodeo,” likens the searing, sinking in feeling of a
post fight realization “‘cause ‘I don’t wanna be in love’/means I don’t wanna be in love/with you” to the dangers and desires of the spectacle of love. “By now I know/this is the rodeo I chose,” she sings, electing to get back on her horse and ride, acknowledging the pain that’s part of that game.

“I wish a different emotion was so alive and exciting to me,” Edwards laughs, “but love is just the one that feels so visceral and consuming!” Perfect Love Song explodes the roller coaster snapshots of romance in bursts of poppy neon bright color, with Edward’s cheeky perspective
polished to full shine. “Lisa Prank has humor to it,” she says. “Some of the songs are really sad to me, but it’s still fun pop punk.” And the mission of that genre, one could argue, is to keep on bopping along through the bullshit of life. To stay buoyant, to find fun in the big what ifs and whatevers.

http://

It what keeps the dream Lisa Prank afloat: as she sings on “Constellation,” “still I keep on hoping this is some perfect love song/and we’ll go on and on and on, and on and on, and on.”
releases October 4th, 2019

Royal Trux returned earlier this year with their comeback album White Stuff. Now they have announced a new EP, “Pink Stuff”, which features five songs from the album remixed by Ariel Pink. They have also shared one of its tracks, “Suburban Junky Lady (Ariel Pink Remix).” Pink Stuff is due out September 6th via Fat Possum Records.

Their return to the studio is nothing short of a rock & roll rapture. The magic chemistry between Jennifer Herrema (vocalmoog, guitar, melodica) and Neil Hagerty (vocal, guitar) that brought us Twin Infinitives, Cats and Dogs and their last LP, Pound for Pound in 2000, is present in the unadulterated, exhilarating energy on these new tracks, 

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Check out “Suburban Junky Lady (Ariel Pink Remix),” followed by the EP’s tracklist .

Pink Stuff EP Tracklist:

1. Suburban Junky Lady (Ariel Pink Remix)
2. Year of The Dog (Ariel Pink Remix)
3. Get Used To This (Ariel Pink Remix)
4. White Stuff (Ariel Pink Remix)
5. Whopper Dave (Ariel Pink Remix)

Releases October 4th, 2019