Posts Tagged ‘ATO Records’

Joseph Announce New Album <i>Good Luck, Kid</i>, Share Honest First Single

Portland-born sisters and folk-pop harmony-makers Joseph are back after a three-year hiatus.

The band announced their third studio LP and second for ATO Records, Good Luck, Kid, is due out September. 13th. The news arrives with a fortified new single, “Fighter” . As ever, Natalie Schepman and her sisters Allison and Meegan Closner use harmony like an emotional conveyor belt, packaging their feelings up and pushing them out into the world through a warm vocal connection that could only be made by siblings. But “Fighter” is bigger and more anthemic than the often-subdued folk of their previous releases, especially their 2014 debut Native Dreamer Kin and 2017 EP Stay Awake. “Fighter” sounds like a loud-and-proud pop song in the vein of Kelly Clarkson’s “Stronger,” but it’s actually a chronicle of inter-band struggles.

“The song’s about how our band almost broke up,” Natalie said. “It’s the story of the three of us wanting different things and dealing with that conflict, and eventually deciding to just keep going.”

While they’re embracing a more vigorous sound here, Natalie, Allison and Meegan are no strangers to pop. “White Flag,” from their 2016 album, is a catchy battle cry that would’ve fit right in on alternative radio. On Good Luck Kid, the band explore both sonic and personal change, as Natalie explains:

The through-line of the album is this idea of moving into the driver’s seat of your own life—recognizing that you’re an adult now, and everything’s up to you from this moment on. You’re not completely sure of how to get where you need to go, and you don’t have any kind of a map to help you. It’s just the universe looking down on you like, “Good luck, kid.”

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The Claypool Lennon Delirium, as the name suggests, has as its nucleus Les Claypool and Sean Lennon. Their latest album, “South of Reality”, was recorded at Rancho Relaxo — the name Claypool has given his home studio in Sonoma County, California. “I don’t bring in producers or engineers because I’m the only one who knows where to kick it when one of the relays sticks,” Claypool says.

In town for a show at the Varsity Theater, the Claypool Lennon Delirium — accompanied by keyboardist João Nogueira and drummer Paulo Baldi — visited The Current for a full studio session hosted by Mary Lucia.

“With Sean and I, we tend to push and pull each other,” Claypool says of the band’s creative process. “I think that’s what’s good about our relationship is we push each other into directions we wouldn’t normally go.”

“I think the thing about Les is that he doesn’t overthink things when it comes to recording because he has a sort of belief in capturing spontaneity,” Lennon adds. “He’s really into capturing the moment like a documentary filmmaker.”

Beyond talking about the latest record, Lucia asks about which instrument, during the learning phase, is probably least forgiving to neighbors. “I know the answer to that one, because I was that neighbor to someone beneath me. I was learning drums,” Lennon says. “I think like a lot of kids, I didn’t really have a sensitivity towards what it’s like to not want to hear the noise. So yeah, I used to actually practice [drums] really loud with the window open and the whole building would complain.”

One of Lennon’s neighbors didn’t complain, however. That neighbor? Roberta Flack.

The Claypool Lennon Delirium perform ‘Blood and Rockets’ from their 2019 album, ‘South of Reality’ (ATO Records) live in The Current studio.

The Band : Les Claypool, bass, vocals Sean Lennon, guitar, vocals João Nogueira, keyboards Paulo Baldi, drums

“Little Fishes”
“Blood and Rockets”
“Easily Charmed By Fools”

All songs from the Claypool Lennon Delirium’s 2019 album, South of Reality, available on ATO Records.

Amyl & the Sniffers

Australian hellions Amyl & The Smiffers have announced their self-titled debut album will be out May 24th via Rough Trade Records, ATO Records and Flightless Records. The first single is the anthemic, rocking “Got You.” The video for it has singer Amy Taylor taking full control of the rest of the band, bathing them with a hose, brushing their teeth by force and leading them around on leashes…which may or may not be an accurate depiction of tour life.

The band have been wowing the U.K with their awesome live sets. ‘Got You’ is taken from Amyl and The Sniffers‘ self-titled debut album out on Rough Trade Records,

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23-year-old Londoner Nilüfer Yanya has made waves with her eccentric, indie-rock-tinged soul and pop. Her debut album, Miss Universe, will drop on March 22nd via ATO Records, and it’s filled with hard-hitting, glistening pop songs with a mature and one-of-a-kind artistic vision (the album is interwoven with spoken-word interludes from a fictional medical company, her frantic new single, “In Your Head,” was among our list of Best Songs of January for her sassy vocals, glittery synths and driving indie-rock riffs. Other standouts include the headbanging “Heavyweight Champion of the World” with its wonderfully bare guitar plucks, charming vocal flutters and punchy melodies as well as the electro-rock stunner “Paralysed.”

Nilüfer Yanya’s debut album, Miss Universe, is out March 22.

ATO Records is thrilled to announce Nilüfer Yanya’s debut album “Miss Universe”, due out March 22nd. Nilufer uniquely blends elements of soul and jazz into intimate pop songs with electronic flourishes and a newly expressed grungy guitar sound. Miss Universe was largely recorded in the same remote Penzance studio she used to jam in with her uncle Joe – a former musician himself – and features co-productions with both her former school guitar teacher The Invisible’s Dave Okumu and her live bandmates Jazzi Bobbi and Luke Bower, as well as producers John Congleton and others.

2019 is starting in whirlwind fashion with Nilufer touring throughout February with Sharon Van Etten across North America.

The Future and the Past

Virginia’s Natalie Prass aimed to make an indie record that sounded like a lush, big budget pop blockbuster, a goal best realised on mini masterpiece single ‘Short Court Style’, its handclaps and taut production an indication of the musician’s technical wizardry and full-hearted songwriting.

In a new video for “The Fire,” directed by Alex Germanotta, Natalie Prass, dressed in pink hues, dances through the crumbling ruins, a colorful contrast to the presidential faces once held in esteem. Tight shots reveal the wear and tear of the faces of men revered, now weathered by the elements.

“This video is a statement on power and power dynamics between people in relationships and in society,” Prass says. “In the end, I gain power, but then I take it away from myself.”

After scrapping the follow-up to her 2015 self-titled debut, Prass wrestled with the results of the 2016 presidential election. The outcome, The Future and The Past, is a reflective — but not heavy-handed — meditation on what happened. “The Fire” captures a feeling of uncertainty, drawing strength in its soaring chorus.

“We felt like we were in a post apocalyptic world,” Prass says of the video’s setting. “I really enjoyed being so pink and so feminine around these massive, masculine busts. It was difficult sometimes, I didn’t really like being on Jackson’s shoulder, but it was empowering being up there and feeling bigger than him for the moment.”

The Future and The Past is out now via ATO Records.

Primus bassist Les Claypool and multi-instrumentalist Sean Lennon have united for their second collaborative album as the Claypool Lennon Delirium. The self-produced South of Reality due to be released February 22nd, 2019 via ATO Records and available for pre-orders now it follows their 2016 debut, Monolith of Phobos, and the proggy 2017 covers EP, Lime and Limpid Green.

The experimental psych-rock duo previewed the LP with the six-and-a-half-minute “Blood and Rockets,” a sprawling epic that finds Lennon and Claypool crooning and snarling, respectively, over spacey synths and chiming guitars. “How high does your rocket fly?” Lennon sings on the chorus, his voice elevated to a blissful falsetto. “Better be careful ’cause you just might set the world on fire.”

Lennon saysthe song’s dark lyrics document “the lascivious exploits of famed JPL rocket scientist Jack Parsons, the man who not only helped America get to the moon with liquid fuel technology, but was also a Magister Templi in Aleister Crowley’s cult, the Ordo Templi Orientis.” He added that Parsons “sadly passed away in a violent explosion during a secretive alchemical experiment at his house in Pasadena.”

The Lennon Claypool Delirium will promote the record on a headlining U.S. tour. Lennon and Claypool co-produced South of Reality themselves, with the Primus frontman engineering and mixing at his own Rancho Relaxo studio in Sonoma County, California. They wrote and recorded the album over roughly two months, prompted by what Claypool describes as “the desire to sit in a room and make space sounds again.”

“Basically it was the same setup in the same place,” the bassist says of their process. “I am a creature of habit and have all my old vintage gear dialed in the way I like it, so I like to helm from the same spot.” The South of Reality announcement arrives just barely a year after Primus issued their ninth LP, The Desaturating Seven, but Claypool emphasizes that he started with a clean slate on the latest Delirium set, with zero “cross-pollination between the two projects.”

Lennon, who was admittedly a bit intimidated years ago before his first jam session with Claypool, felt more at ease during their most recent sessions. However, he still describes Claypool as a disciplined “ship captain” who expects his musicians to be prepared on day one of any rehearsal.

“We are great friends indeed, and I guess I’m not nervous in quite the same way as I was in the beginning, but I still make sure to do as much preparation as possible,” he says. “Ideas always come quick for us, and I think that’s why we like working together. But playing with Les is like knowing you’re gonna be playing tennis with Rafael Nadal – it makes you wanna brush up on a few things before you get on the court.”

The pair wrote in every possible permutation: jamming, bringing in seeds of musical ideas, fleshing out tracks from scratch. Their resulting material feels like an organic extension of Monolith of Phobos, blending the wildly surreal and psychedelic with satirical social commentary.

The paranoid, Eastern-tinged “Cricket Chronicles Revisited” – a continuation of “The Cricket and the Genie” from their first LP – is a critique on what Lennon calls “our modern tendency to over-medicate both children and adults alike.” He elaborates: “Most people just need to eat better and exercise, but we’re told to believe the only answer is some drug that sounds like it comes from another galaxy. The [song’s] spoken word outro is just an extension of that Big Pharma advertisement language; the side effects are so unbelievably insane it’s hard to imagine taking any drug that can give you octopus tentacles, or make you spontaneously combust. Honestly the real ones are worse than that I just can’t mention them here.”

Claypool developed the bouncy, heady “Easily Charmed By Fools” from a line in a Charles Bukowski story that he swiped and let linger for years in his note book. “When it came time to flesh it out, there were no lack of examples to support that notion,” he says. “Who is the bigger fool; the fool or those that follow the fool? It may be the guy that tries to write a song about such things in an environment where rational thought is being vilified on a daily basis.”

South Of Reality, The Claypool Lennon Delirium’s epic sophomore album might be just the antidote this sick world needs. Music so potent it could repel an asteroid impact from space, these seasoned warriors of psychedelia have crafted timeless songs that may as well be chiseled in stone. The monolithic dream team’s new record was produced by Les Claypool and Sean Lennon themselves, and engineered and mixed by Les Claypool at his own Rancho Relaxo studio in Sonoma County, California. Available worldwide on Feb 22nd, 2019.

Ben KwellerBen KwellerRelated image

Ben KwellerBen KwellerThe first ever US vinyl pressing of Ben Kweller’s classic 2002 record Sha Sha, a monumental album for both Kweller and ATO Records. At the time of it’s release, Rolling Stone said classic pop, power pop, alt-pop, indie-pop and anti-folk are all at home on the album… capturing both the loneliness and freedom of early adulthood. Remastered by Greg Calbi at Sterling Sound from the original 1/2 tapes, packaged in a gatefold jacket and pressed on 180 Gram white vinyl. Underscoring the songwriting skill he’s been working at since age eight and over the course of 11 songs, he plays acoustic, folk-rock, alternative, power pop, and straight-ahead rock; his lyrics are consistently heart-sung.

Sha Sha was the debut album by American indie rock singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and former Radish member Ben Kweller. The album was originally composed of outtakes from sessions for Radish’s unreleased album Discount Fireworks. It was self-released by Kweller, via CD-R, in 2000. In 2002, ATO Records released a second version of the album with a radically different track listing featuring many new recordings and songs. What 20-year-old Kweller lacks in crafting his own sound, he makes up for in crafting virulently infectious hooks.,

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‘Sorry is Gone’ is available everywhere . The whole record is about me taking my life back, without really realizing it. I realized I’m the only person that is going to look out for me. I have to be my main person. No one else. I have to sing about things and write about things that have happened to me as therapy. That’s what connects me to other music I listen to. I want music to make me feel things. This is my inner dialogue, and my chance to get the last word.

Jessica Lea Mayfield might make some people uncomfortable with the level of honesty she projects on her forthcoming LP, “Sorry Is Gone”, but she’s not going to apologize – for that, or for anything else on her complex, confessional fourth album. Recorded with producer John Agnello (Sonic Youth, Kurt Vile, Phosphorescent and Dinosaur Jr.), Sorry Is Gone is a raw document of a woman in progress; one weathering cruel storms but finally able to blame the rain itself for the flood. Written as the truth of her own poisonous marriage unfolded before her eyes, Sorry Is Gone is a record of permission. Permission to create freely, to escape what is no longer safe and to stop bearing responsibility for things done to her, not by her. As Mayfield sings on the title track, “the sorry is gone.” Indeed, it is; kicked to the curb with every strum of her guitar.

Written in the years since her last solo LP, Make My Head Sing, in 2014, and her 2015 collaboration with Seth Avett and Jessica Lea Mayfield Sing Elliott Smith, Sorry Is Gone became the soundtrack to a highly personal and traumatic story. The Ohio-born Mayfield was quietly enduring years of domestic abuse, smiling and touring while she hid a brewing tempest – and the bruises, too. But lyrics don’t lie even as bruises fade, and they started to tell the tale of her marriage before she was even able to; songs often dark and dangerous and ready to confront and claim her life. Written primarily on an acoustic baritone guitar – out of necessity at first, in her thin-walled apartment – Mayfield started to process the years of hurt and uncertainly through words and melodies that helped her see the light in the darkness.

Though much of Make My Head Sing was written music-first, Sorry Is Gone began with those lyrics, and, so often, a path forward unfolded itself as the songs formed. “The cold hard truth is you love me too much,” she sings on “Meadow” a moody, echoey moment about finally realizing someone’s true colors. “The cold hard truth is you couldn’t love me enough.” It’s a brutal line from someone who refuses to be victimized. Evoking the pathos of nineties grunge, the folk confessions of her idol, Smith, and the cool blasé of bands like Luscious Jackson, the tracks that comprise Sorry Is Gone aren’t devised to make anyone comfortable but herself – but they are there to help share an emotional journal and a certain kind of healing that can only come through music.

“I have to sing about things and write about things that have happened to me as therapy,” says Mayfield, who shaped so many of these songs in the isolation of the small apartment she shared with her husband while their marriage fell apart in her hands – in many ways, those songs pointed to the way out before she could get there herself. “That’s what connects me to other music I listen to. I want music to make me feel things. This is my inner dialogue, and my chance to get the last word.”

Recorded with Agnello at Water Music and Electric Lady Studios, Mayfield recruited a stellar group of musicians for Sorry Is Gone, including Avett on backing vocals and keys, drummer Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth, Sun Kil Moon), bassist Emil Amos (Grails, Holy Sons), guitarist Cameron Deyell (Sia, Streets of Laredo) and Patrick Damphier (The Mynabirds, Field Days, who produced and played on “Offa My Hands”). Together, they worked to create an ominous take on love, where hope can exist among heartbreak and the end is only as finite as we make it to be. On songs like the title track and “Bum Me Out,” Mayfield bends the angelic notes of her voice over off-kilter orchestration, building an environment of warrior-style triumph; on “Safe 2 Connect 2” she takes stock of the digital world to a haunting, acoustic backdrop that gives a subtle ode to her bluegrass roots.

“Been though hell, there’s no telling what might happen in my future,” she sings. “All I can do is be thankful for each moment that’s my own.”

Mayfield has paved an unconventional lifestyle – playing in her family’s bluegrass band since the age of eight, she didn’t have any traditional schooling and released her first album at the age of fifteen, when she was discovered by Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys. Influenced by everything from that mountain sound to the modern garage, Mayfield has been able to come at songwriting from a pure perspective, lead more by her heart than any textbook. It’s what makes the tracks of Sorry Is Gone so striking and visceral – there is no filter on the emotions, no rulebook and certainly no excuses for anything she’s been through or the candor she fires.

“I’m not going to bite my lip on anything,” she says. “If there is one thing I am going to do, it’s talk and sing about what I want to. No one is going to manipulate me.”

The sorry is gone, once and for all – and Sorry Is Gone is a permission slip for anyone who wants to stop apologizing for others, and start living for themselves. ●

Natalie Prass has announced her sophomore album, The Future and the Past. It’s out June 1st via ATO. Prass also shared the lead single recently and its music video, directed and produced by Prass and Erica Prince.  In a press statement, Prass says she rewrote the new record following the 2016 election. She writes, “I needed to make an album that was going to get me out of my funk, one that would hopefully lift other people out of theirs, too, because that’s what music is all about.” The Future and the Past follows Prass’ 2015 self-titled debut; she also released her Side by Side EP the same year.

Watch Natalie Prass get the PledgeHouse SXSW crowd dancing with new songs from her forthcoming album.

Natalie Prass, whose 2015 self-titled debut earned swoons from tastemakers around the world. Its rich soundcraft fueled intense anticipation for her forthcoming follow-up ‘The Future and the Past.’ Be among the first to hear her new sounds at our SXSW stage.

Songs performed 0:33 Oh My 3:47 Hot for the Mountain 13:18 Bird of Prey 17:57 Short Court Style

New album ‘The Future and the Past’ available June