Posts Tagged ‘ATO Records’

Image may contain: indoor

“In The Rainbow Rain” will be out 27th April via the fine folks at ATO. Okkervil’s last album, Away, was my favorite Okkervil River album release for awhile. Based on this track, Sheff seems to have maintained the momentum.

Here’s some info on the album.

Will Sheff and the band started work on the new album shortly after the end of that tour – and the presidential election. “If December 2016 was good for anything, it was good for writing songs,” he says. Galvanized by the seismic events of that Fall and the following year, Sheff, sometimes co-writing with his new band, channeled his outrage and sadness into music intended to be hopeful, healing and uplifting. Inspired by the Quaker meetings he had been attending, Sheff injected the album with undercurrents of spirituality and gratitude. The result is something akin to a modern secular gospel record, and among the best music of his career.

Okkervil River “In The Rainbow Rain” out April 27th!

Okkervil River is the folk rock band led by Will Sheff. The cult band is a favourite amongst their peers as much as their own fans. The band from Austin, Texas, take their name from a short story by contemporary Russian author Tatyana Tolstaya. The band formed in 1998 and quickly released the EP Bedroom followed by the seven track EP Stars Too Small To Use the next year.

The band have released a total of seven studio albums including Don’t Fall In Love With Everyone You See (2002), Down The River Of Golden Dreams (2003), Black Sheep Boy (2005), The Stage Names (2007), The Stands Ins (2008), I Am Very Far  their latest album The Silver Gymnasium (2013).

Advertisements

Arguably the most overtly political act on the folk-rock scene right now, we suspected this new album from Alynda Lee Segarra and co would be a bit of a call to arms. Indeed, it is, and it delivers. “The Navigator” is the sixth full-length studio album by Hurray for the Riff Raff, released by ATO Records last March 2017. The album was produced by Paul Butler, a member of the band The Bees. This powerful album has musical diversity, consistent quality and gripping songwriting all while feeling effortless,

“The question of identity is touched upon throughout the songs here (national, political, gender), but in terms of musical identity, Hurray for the Riff Raff know exactly who they are.

http://

Image may contain: fire, cloud, night and outdoor

ATO Records presents a new limited edition double-A side single from the Drive-By Truckers featuring “What It Means” recorded live at the 2017 Newport Folk Festival. The cut is imbued with an urgent energy, taking it’s place among the history of the festival and protest music past. Love this track it has echoes of the Band,

It’s paired with a new track: “The Perilous Night” written by Patterson Hood in the wake of the Charlottesville protests, and recorded with David Barbe in Athens, GA. Two dollars from each sale will benefit the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Available as a double A-side 7″: “What It Means” (Live at Newport Folk Festival) b/w “The Perilous Night”.

Band Members
Patterson Hood
Mike Cooley
Brad Morgan
Jay Gonzalez
Matt Patton

Image may contain: 5 people, text

The Portland-trio consisting of sisters, Natalie Schepman, Allison Closner and Meegan Closner. Joseph recently released their new EP, “Stay Awake”, and have this week shared a new track from it, their cover of Everybody Wants To Rule The World, originally by Briish band Tears For Fears.

Discussing their decision to take on this classic track, Natalie recollects the band listening to the track, and how, “it hit us how pertinent it is today even though it was written in the 80’s. Today, maybe more than ever”. Joseph’s take is a sparse and beautiful interpretation; rhythmic stabs of guitar are accompanied by rich piano chords and gorgeous rushes of lead guitar. The production of the vocals is never short of stunning, the band’s naturally beautiful tones, slip in and out of perfectly judged two and three-part harmonies. The voices build to a stunning vocal crescendo as the band sing in unison, “make the most of freedom and pleasure, all I know is take care of each other, an open door, a seat at the table, there’s enough to go around”. It’s haunting how that message still resonates, and in Joseph’s perfectly judged hands the track has never sounded better.

Stay Awake is out now via ATO Records.

“Everybody Wants To Rule The World” is Joseph’s interpretation of the Tears for Fears original, from Joseph’s new “Stay Awake” EP.

There is nothing like the sound of siblings singing together. With the release of I’m Alone, No You’re Not, the mesmerizing, hypnotic sound of the trio known as Joseph—made up of sisters Allison, Meegan, and Natalie Closner—joins this elite company.

“It’s just second nature, like a fifth limb that’s already on you,” says first-born Natalie. “There’s an ability to anticipate what’s going to happen and blend with it. When Meegan and Allison sing, they know exactly what I’m going to do and when.”

But the Closners didn’t actually start singing together when they were growing up in Oregon, the children of artistic parents (their dad was a jazz singer and drummer, their mom a theater teacher). Natalie was the performer—“the older sister who stood on the edge of the fireplace and told everyone, ‘Watch me!,’“ she says. Twins Meegan and Allison stayed out of her lane, joining in for their mother’s musical theater productions but otherwise avoiding the spotlight.

When Natalie was in college, she began pursuing music more seriously. The summer before her senior year, she went to Nashville to check out the scene and work on her guitar playing and songwriting. She had recorded an EP and done a few rounds of touring when a friend sat her down one day.

“It was kind of dramatic,” she says, “He took me aside and said, ‘I don’t think you really believe in this.’ It stopped me in my tracks.” She thought deeply about the music she was making and had a curious epiphany; she decided to ask her sisters if they would consider singing with her.

Initially, they didn’t really get it. “We thought she was asking us to be background singers, so we didn’t take it that seriously,” says Allison. “It was more commitment than I was expecting—I even tried to leave at one point, but after a while, I was convinced.”

A transformation occurred when the Closners were in the process of recording their first album, Native Dreamer Kin. At the time, they were calling themselves Dearborn, but their producer felt that the name didn’t fit the strength of the music. They went to visit their grandfather Jo, in the eastern Oregon town of Joseph. Allison made a playlist for the trip and called it “Joseph,” which is what influenced the band’s name.

With this new sense of themselves, Meegan and Allison began taking a more active role in the group’s songwriting. Meegan notes that while the process was a “totally new journey” for her, it felt similar to the candor and vulnerability of her long-time journaling—just “pulling out the gold and arranging that into neater lines.”

She and Natalie both point to the song “Honest” as a keystone for the development of I’m Alone, No You’re Not. “We were trying really hard to write a song, but nothing was coming,” recalls Natalie. “One night, Meegan was working on some lyrics and getting frustrated, so she wrote in the margin of the page, ‘I can’t say a true thing. It’s hard to be that honest.’ Immediately after that, her most honest sentence spilled out—‘There’s always two thoughts, one after the other: I’m alone. No, you’re not.’ And she thought, ‘Oh, there’s the song.’ “

Meanwhile, the group was cultivating a devoted fan base in the most traditional ways possible: touring the Western states playing living room shows, backyard parties, and secret house party gigs; reaching an audience directly through such platforms as Noisetrade; selling their self-released CD and building a loyal following step by step. By the time they were approached by ATO Records, Joseph had already built a strong community of fans on its own.

As they moved toward making their second record, the project took an additional turn when the Closners decided to work with some other songwriters in Los Angeles. “We were afraid of it at first because the songs were more pop than we were used to writing,” says Meegan, “but as we internalized them, they started becoming super-important to us.”

They point to “More Alive Than Dead,” co-written with Ethan Gruska, as an example of these contributions. “That song describes an experience with a partner where you have hard things in your combined past,” says Natalie. “You’re haunted by them until you realize that those things are dead, and as long as you dwell on them, you’re missing the real live person in front of you.”

She adds, though, that Gruska was critical in clarifying and sharpening the nuanced emotion of the lyric. “When Ethan sent us back the demo, I lost it, He was able to see the heart of the song and bring it out, cut to the core of what I was trying to say.”

Finally, the women of Joseph recorded the album with acclaimed producer Mike Mogis (Bright Eyes, Jenny Lewis, First Aid Kit) at his studio in Omaha. He was able to open up their expansive, evocative vocal sound with powerful and striking arrangements, adding depth while highlighting their haunting intensity.

“This was our first time doing a recording like this,” says Natalie, “and we learned so much about creativity. Mike is a genius, and he’s just a total maniac as a musician, so he took these bare bones songs and brought them to life with lush, gorgeous textures and sounds.”

The initial reaction to the music on I’m Alone, No You’re Not has been remarkable. Joseph was selected as a #SpotifySpotlight artist, and booked for festivals including Bonnaroo, Pickathon, and Sasquatch even prior to the release of the single “White Flag,” a song inspired by an article predicting a massive earthquake for the Pacific Northwest.

“Reading that created a heaviness that was making us jumpy, scared, and miserable,” says Natalie. “It became clear we had two options: be scared and cowering, backing away from the world into paralysis, or keep moving and live. Defy fear. Wear peace. Find better ways to love the people in our lives instead of huddling together like frightened sheep thinking about earthquakes.”

Most rewarding for the Closner sisters has been feeling the audience response to the new songs, as they tour supporting such artists as James Bay and Amos Lee. “This is really when you learn what’s special about a song, or if it’s special,” says Natalie. “It’s this crazy firecracker thing that happens—‘Am I feeling something? Is anyone? What is this song, what does it do, which parts make the most sense?’

“It really is about connection with people, and we’re so grateful we’ve gotten the chance to do that. This has been a totally wild journey, and we’re constantly blown away with possibility of what could be.”

Band Members
Natalie, Allison, and Meegan

 

Image may contain: 1 person, playing a musical instrument and guitar

Margaret Glaspy strips back DJ Snake’s ‘Let Me Love You’ for triple j’s Like A Version, Like A Version is a segment on Australian radio station triple j. Every Friday morning a musician or band comes into the studio to play one of their own songs and a cover of a song they love. Margaret Glaspy is a New York-based songwriter who originally hails from Red Bluff, California, and this morning she sang ‘Let Me Love You’, which usually hails from Justin Bieber’s mouth.

“Emotions and Math” is not simply the name of Margaret Glaspy’s new debut album. That expression drills right to the heart of the New York singer-songwriter’s proper introduction, a mission statement both artistic and personal.
On its surface, the title track talks about being a touring musician and figuring out how to see your partner, looking at the calendar and calculating how you’re going to spend time together. But “Emotions and Math,” which ATO Records will released earlier in summer 2016, also sums up an epiphany she had while making the record.

The DJ Snake track got the Glaspy treatment and we were blown away with ~the vocals~:

US singer-songwriter Margaret Glaspy performs her original tune ‘You And I’ live in triple j’s Like A Version studio. Glaspy, who’s 27 and grew up in Red Bluff, California, self-produced the album, which frames her revealing ruminations in shards of jagged guitar rock. Building on its early buzz — Rolling Stone hailed first single “You and I” for its “hot barbs of electric guitar,” and declared it a “stomping rocker

2016 was the year that I suddenly felt much older than I often assume myself to be . Thankfully, such fears found a soundtrack in the beautiful new album from Okkervil River, and one that stands as Will Sheff’s best collection of songs for at least a decade or, perhaps, ever.

Happening almost by accident, after Sheff had taken himself away from the humdrum of daily life, to reflect both on the changing shape of his band, as well as the passing of his Grandfather, ‘Away’ feels markedly significant from the outset; clutching at memories from his own life, while shaping his worries and consternations about death and ageing, and the living we all have to do in-between, in to a narrative that flips between both something embracing and complex, with unbridled will. Rousing, delicate, beautiful, and haunted, ‘Away’ carries all the drama that we’ve come to know and love throughout Okkervil River’s lifetime and adorns it with a striking sense of humanity; like pumping warm blood into limbs we were just thinking might well hang cold for the rest of our days. It turns out, however, that there’s life in them yet.

Recorded at Sear Sound in New York City and mixed by Shawn Everett (Alabama Shakes, Lucius, Weezer), Margaret Glaspy‘s debut album ‘Emotions And Math’ – due out June 17th – sees Glaspy tackling topics of insecurity, love lost and found, and life on the road with clarity, honesty and a cutting sense of humor, all backed by gritty, fiercely performed electric guitar.

Margaret Glaspy has earned early praise from The New York Times, Stereogum and NME. Rolling Stone hailed her “hot barbs of electric guitar,” and VICE Noisey love her “complex, deceptively heavy riffs with vocals that really stand out and grab you at the throat.” Bob Boilen of NPR’s All Songs Considered “a great young singer-songwriter.”

Margaret Glaspy’s debut album, ‘Emotions and Math,’ is out June 17 on ATO Records!

MMJ

My Morning Jacket have announced that a rework and reissue of their third LP It Still Moves will arrive this May. The deluxe reissue of the 2003 album features the album’s 12 songs remixed and remastered as well as three unreleased songs from the It Still Moves sessions – “En La Ceremony,” “Grab a Body” and “That’s Too Bad” – plus singer Jim James’ own demos.

The reissue is due out May 27th on ATO. Fans who pre-order the album will receive instant downloads of the polished-up versions of It Still Moves’ “Golden” and “Mahgeetan.”

According to James, the band’s intense touring schedule at the time forced My Morning Jacket to hurriedly complete the album, which left the band feeling as though It Still Moves was “unfinished.” “Everybody can relate to something they’ve done in their life where you didn’t know it at the time, but you were rushed through finishing it,” James said. The 15th anniversary of the LP allowed James to revisit the album and remix it to his liking. The original album was “tweaked” by James, remastered by Bob Ludwig and mixed by Kevin Ratterman.

In addition to the remixed album tracks and three unreleased songs, the It Still Moves reissue also boasts James‘ original demo versions of 10 of the album’s 12 songs. “I feel lucky to have had so many songs that feel like there are chances to go in other directions,” James said of the demos. “It definitely feels more lonely. Maybe more haunting.”

The It Still Moves reissue will be released in a special deluxe package with new artwork and exclusive photos in either a 2-CD or 4-LP 180 vinyl set.

Speaking to the New York Times, James referred to the original version of It Still Moves as the band’s “wet blanket” album, a joke about the LP’s muffled sound. “It Still Moves is really the only record in our catalog that I’ve always felt I wanted to remix,” James said. “Part of the fun of that record was that we recorded it all to tape, and it was all super-duper organic. But when we mixed it originally, we didn’t have enough time. We thought we were happy with it, but there are certain things that bothered me when I would listen to it, like, ‘Oh my God, you can’t hear that guitar solo.'”

As for the three mostly unreleased tracks – “Grab a Body” was technically a limited Record Store Day release back in 2012 – James had current MMJ bandmates guitarist Carl Broemel and keyboardist Bo Koster, who didn’t join the band until the year after It Still Moves’ release, add flourishes to the tracks. “It became this fuller picture of the band, with most of the members from past and present playing together in a world,” James said of the bonus tracks.

Two Gallants performs “Some Trouble” live in Studio A. Recorded 2/12/15. On February 3rd, the San Francisco based guitar-drum duo Two Gallants are set to release their 5th studio album, We Are Undone, on ATO Records. While singer and guitarist Adam Stephens and drummer Tyson Vogel have stayed true to the two-person format since their acclaimed 2004 debut, The Throes, their sound has evolved considerably over the intervening years. Following 2012’s The Bloom and the Blight, We Are Undone is the band’s second release on ATO. Thematically, the album ranges from songs that attempt to make sense of the dramatically shifting social landscape of their home town, to the illusion of authenticity, impending environmental collapse, and romantic estrangement. Sonically, the thrash blues of songs such as “We Are Undone” and “Some Trouble” is balanced by the austerity of ballads such as “My Man Go” and “There’s So Much I Don’t Know.”

weareundone