Posts Tagged ‘Phoebe Bridgers’

Image may contain: 3 people, people sitting and guitar

New Indie-rock godsends Boygenius aka Phoebe Bridgers, Julien Baker and Lucy Dacus  made their TV debut on Monday’s Late Night with Seth Meyers, performing the song “Me & My Dog,” one of the three singles from their self-titled debut EP.

Bridgers takes lead on “Me & My Dog,” and if her opening lines (“We had a great day / even though we forgot to eat / and you had a bad dream”) don’t send shivers down your spine, you may want to verify that you have a heartbeat. Seeing Bridgers, Baker and Dacus step to their mics to sing in unison—to say nothing of Bridgers’ towering sustained note at the song’s climax is nearly sublime enough to make one forget what an anxiety-ridden day today is.

The trio surprise-released boygenius on digital platforms on October. 26th, two weeks ahead of its official physical release this Friday, November 9th. Bridgers, Baker and Dacus wll embark on a North American tour together .

Boygenius perform “Me & My Dog” on Late Night

Advertisements

boygenius packshot.jpg

The good people at Matador Records have finally pulled back the curtain on their new supergroup made up of songwriters Lucy Dacus, Julien Baker and Phoebe Bridgers. The all-star trio’s self-titled, six-track EP Boygenius is coming out on November. 9th via Matador, but you can hear the project’s first three singles now.

Dacus, Baker and Bridgers’ mysterious and much-anticipated team-up first made waves in early August when Bridgers confirmed its existence at an NPR Music event. Soon after, a media outlet received a photo of the group, accompanied only by the word “boygenius” and the Matador logo. We now know that to be the name of both the trio and their forthcoming release, previewed via lead singles “Me & My Dog,” “Bite The Hand” and “Stay Down.”

Bridgers takes point on the affectionate, yet anxiety-ridden “Me & My Dog,” singing over steady electric guitar strums, “I had a fever / until I met you / Now you make me cool / but sometimes I still do / something embarrassing,” her gossamer vocals giving way to delicate banjo notes and droning synths. Baker’s voice bolsters Bridgers’ as the chorus-less song crescendos, pushing through the fears that obstruct desire. “I dream about it and I wake up from it,” the duo conclude, their voices drowned out by a rising tide of reverb.

Second single “Bite The Hand” is Dacus’ chance to shine, an unflinching declaration of independence that would have fit right in on Historian. What sets it apart from her solo work, however, is its choruses, on which Dacus, Baker and Bridgers harmonize to drop-dead gorgeous and increasingly powerful effect, warning an unwanted partner, “I can’t love you how you want me to.” The song closes on their voices, with nothing but bare conviction against the silence.

The devastating “Stay Down,” meanwhile, is all Baker, her trademark reverb-steeped guitars and emotive vocals expanded upon with scattershot percussion and moving strings. Her lyrics are shot through with heart-rending resignation: “I wasn’t a fighter till somebody told me / I had better learn to lean into the punch / so it don’t hurt as bad when they leave / There you were, turning your cheek,” Baker begins, later demanding, “Push me down into the water like a sinner, roll me under / and I’ll never come up again / I’ll just stay down.” Fuck us up, boygenius.

 

Dacus, Baker and Bridgers head out on tour together this November, though they won’t do so as a trio—rather, they’ll each be performing their own solo sets. But who knows? Judging by the unpredictable way in which their boygenius team-up has come to light, perhaps the collaborators will see their way to delivering some surprises live, as well.

Julien Baker, Phoebe Bridgers, and Lucy Dacus formed Boygenius after booking a tour together, but the trio had subconsciously been in the works for longer than that. Through a series of tours and performances together, and chance encounters that led to friendships – including Bridgers’ and Dacus’ first in-person meeting backstage at a Philadelphia festival, greenroom hangouts that felt instantly comfortable and compatible, a couple of long email chains and even a secret handshake between Baker and Dacus – the lyrically and musically arresting singer-songwriters and kindred spirits got to know each other on their own terms.

“When we met, Lucy and Phoebe and I were in similar places in our lives and our musical endeavors, but also had similar attitudes toward music that engendered an immediate affinity,” Baker explains. “Lucy and Phoebe are incredibly gifted performers, and I am fans of their art outside of being their friends, but they are also both very wise, discerning and kind people whom I look up to in character as much as in talent.”

Listen to boygenius’ EP “Me & My Dog,” “Bite The Hand” and “Stay Down”.

Image may contain: 1 person

Phoebe Bridgers track Scott Street an exclusive live performance for Vevo DSCVR, the channel for the best in new music. It’s a real skill to wax forlorn without submitting to the depths of despair. In the last two years Phoebe Bridgers has shown us just how articulate she can be regarding the throubled side of life while still touting the small joys that mark most day to day experiences. Again and again, the singer-songwriter revels in the marvels of the emotional deets that shape who we are. After critics erupted over the eloquence of the 23-year-old’s ‘Stranger In The Alps’ (get the ‘Lebowski’ reference?), the Silver Lake-based Bridgers went through a wave of Joni-Jackson comparisons.

Elements of the masters dot her songs, but some of her more recent heroes are Sun Kil Moon’s Mark Kozelek and Elliot Smith – tender wordsmiths whose best work is both vulnerable and poised. If you know Bridgers’ “Smoke Signals” and “Motion Sickness,” you might’ve heard her “Scott Street” before, too. But not like this. Our DSCVR performance turns the tune, inspired by a sunset stroll through her Echo Park hood, into an epic lament. Swirling fiddle lines and cloudy guitar flourishes prove the singer knows exactly what she needs to bolster her designs as she closes with farewell line of “don’t be a stranger.” Masterful.

Image result for phoebe bridgers

Phoebe Bridgers gave indie rock a shot in the arm last year with the wonderful “Stranger In The Alps”, the Los Angeles musician’s debut album – she became one of our favorite artists of 2017, and her song “Funeral” was among our most played tracks of the year’s roundup. Today, she’s back with a beautiful cover of “The Gold” by Manchester Orchestra, and contrary to the title, the Elliott Smith-harkening song is about a relationship that’s lost its lustre

Phoebe’s cover of Manchester Orchestra‘s “The Gold,” the excellent single from last year’s A Black Mile to the Surface. Phoebe doesn’t change the song up too drastically, but she performs it in that same intimate, instantly-gripping way that she performs her own music, and really makes the song sound like one of her own (as she has done with other covers, like the Mark Kozelek song she did for her great 2017 album Stranger in the Alps.

Manchester Orchestra“The Gold (Phoebe Bridgers Version),” out now on Dead Oceans Records.

Image may contain: 1 person

In a hotel room near midnight, Phoebe Bridgers shares a lullaby for the lost. You can’t help but hang on for dear life. Phoebe Bridgers was one of our top discoveries going into Austin’s SXSW, a quiet and powerful voice in the loud din of the festival. After she performed at Central Presbyterian Church, a favorite venue,  Bridgers and percussionist Marshall Vore came to NPR host Bob Boilen’s hotel room just before midnight to play the striking song “Smoke Signals.” Stripped of the strings on the studio version, there is still a sweeping quality to this acoustic performance, something like Low’s elegiac waltzes blurred into open chords, suitcase percussion, children’s toy bells and vocal harmony. You can’t help but hang on for dear life.

Image may contain: one or more people and text

The Lord Huron song “The Night We Met” found its way into the massively popular, albeit oft-maudlin, series, 13 Reasons Why with a new take on their hit song featuring the noir-ish indie songstress Phoebe Bridgers. 

“The Night We Met” is a track from Lord Huron’s 2015 release, the spacey indie-folk travel log “Strange Trails”. Bridgers’ vocal contribution expands the song’s already-haunting melody to encompass a deeper sense of melancholia, something she also comfortably emits on her critically adored 2017 LP Stranger in the AlpsLord Huron’s Ben Schneider and Bridgers are likely collaborators, too: Each have traversed the spectrum of indie-folk sounds, though Bridgers says she isn’t yet committed to a confined style.

Lyrically, her gorgeous 2017 debut album Stranger in the Alps – which she recorded independently before being signed to the Dead Oceans label – grapples a lot with death. The late Lemmy from Motörhead and David Bowie are both referred to, while the song Funeral was inspired by a boy Bridgers knew who died of a heroin overdose. “Jesus Christ, I’m so blue all the time and that’s just how I feel, always have and always will,” she sings, the mournful mood recalling the late American miserabilist Elliott Smith.  Yet, in person, Bridgers could hardly be sunnier. “I didn’t realise there was such a heavy theme on the record until I started recording the album.

The standout single from Stranger in the Alps, was “Motion Sickness” it has amassed more than half-a-million views on YouTube and is an exquisite evisceration of a former lover. “I faked it every time,” she sings, before landing another blow to the solar plexus: “And why do you sing with an English accent?/ I guess it’s too late to change it now.”

The song, she tells me, is about the Grammy-nominated singer- songwriter Ryan Adams, whom she met in 2015. “A mutual friend in LA was like, ‘Ryan would like you’. He really was just trying to get me recording and trying to get Ryan to hear me, but Ryan was like, ‘Let me see a picture of her’.” Bridgers says that she and Adams “ended up hanging out all night and recording a song together called Killer. Then, a couple of weeks later, he was suddenly trying to hook up with me. I was super-down and had just broken up with my high-school boyfriend. We slept together on his 40th birthday and I’d just turned 20.”

She wrote Motion Sickness after they broke up. What did he think of it? “We were back on good terms by then but after I sent him the song he didn’t talk to me for 24 hours. Then he sent me a sweet text saying ‘it’s a great song’,” she says. “Yes, interesting character…”

Bridgers wrote “Smoke Signals” in a cabin outside Ketchum, Idaho, last spring. It finds her somberly emoting against a backdrop of guitar chords and orchestral swells. Sometimes her words are poetic: “I wanna live at a Holiday Inn where somebody else makes the bed/ We’ll watch TV while the lights on the street put all the stars to death.” Other times she’s more straightforward but just as powerful: “All of our problems, I’m gonna solve them/ With you riding shotgun, speeding ’cause fuck the cops.” References to Bowie, the Smiths, and Motörhead might capture your attention, but the recurring image of trash burning on the beach is what will linger with you.

http://

“Smoke Signals” is out digitally and available as a 7″ backed by “Motion Sickness (Demo)” at Bridgers’ upcoming shows.

Phoebe Bridgers

Phoebe Bridgers performs in The Current studio

The lyrics of Phoebe Bridgers‘ songs are so emotionally vivid, it makes sense that when it comes to songwriting, Bridgers follows her gut. “I think some sort of idea or phrase has to stick with me in a way that will make me want to explore it more,” Bridgers says. “But I don’t really have a process that I could write out for anybody or tell anybody how to do it. It’s just whatever happens to be on my mind.”

Bridgers and her full band  stopped at The Current for a session .

Bridgers‘ debut full-length album, Stranger In The Alps, was released in September 2017, but prior to that, she had already worked with people like Ryan Adams, Conor Oberst and John Doe, seemingly oblivious to the old saw advising never to meet your heroes. “I think that’s true of some people, but I’ve been pretty lucky,” Bridgers says. “I can speak for John Doe — you will never be disappointed by that person. I think [one should] meet your heroes if they’re going to go above and beyond and just be your forever people. Conor’s a forever person. … I think it’s invigorating to meet your heroes when they’re so human and cool.”

Probably Bridgers‘ first hero is her own mother, whom Bridgers says has great musical tastes. ” I think I just kind of fell into [music] from what she was listening to around the house: Jackson Brown, Tom Waits, Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, that scene,” Bridgers explains.

Now with one full-length album under her belt, Bridgers is looking ahead to what’s next. “I think I’m eager to keep writing,” she says. “The songs that are the most fun for me to play are obviously the songs that are the most new. It’s exciting thinking about recording another record, where I’ll have more context for the music I’m playing. But it’s cool seeing people — especially young people — connecting with songs I wrote [when I was younger], because it makes me feel like I struck a chord with my peers at the time, so it’s cool.”

Guitar/vox: Phoebe Bridgers Bass: Anna Butterss Drums: Marshall Vore Keyboards: Nick White Guitar: Harrison Whitford

Phoebe Bridgers is an Music favorite she’s already been one of our ones to watch.  Her ” Stranger in the Alps” was one of last year’s best debuts. Singer Songwriter Noah Gundersen has spent the last decade breaking out slowly and steadily, releasing a long string of well-received albums and EPs.

Last fall, Bridgers opened for Gundersen on a tour that stopped in the latter’s Seattle hometown. The two actually go way back she used to sell merch at his shows — so sharing a stage gave them the idea to visit Seattle’s Studio X and record an eight-minute medley of their songs with help from Gundersen’s sister Abby. It’s remarkable how well their voices and songwriting blend as they swap verses and share choruses: Bridgers’ “Killer” stuns in any setting, and Gundersen’s “The Sound” is a revelation in their collective hands. Performed back to back, the two songs sound hauntingly beautiful.

Bridgers is one of Gundersen’s biggest fans: “I’ve been a fanatic Noah fan since I was a teenager,” she writes via email. “He changed the way I write music, made me more comfortable with being honest in my songs. Getting to sing with him was like getting pulled onstage by your favorite band during a show.” The feeling, it turns out, is mutual.

“I’m just a big fan of her work,” Gundersen writes. “I listened to her record obsessively and I wanted to make something with her. This was recorded on our last day of tour together, when we all had a few spare hours in the afternoon.”

http://

Phoebe Bridgers’ debut albumStranger in the Alps, is out now via Dead Oceans Records. Noah Gundersen’s new record, White Noise, is out now via Cooking Vinyl.

On one hand, Phoebe Bridgers’ debut album features desperately downcast lyrics like “Jesus Christ, I’m so blue all the time / And that’s just how I feel / Always have and always will.” On the other, the singer-songwriter’s website resides at phoebefuckingbridgers.com, and the title of Stranger In The Alps is a nod to the ludicrously edited-for-TV version of The Big Lebowski. Maybe these glimpses of humor are just Bridges trying to let the world know that she’s actually okay. Because listening to this mortally sad, yet frequently magical debut, you might be led to believe she’s irretrievably despondent.

But Bridgers’ melancholy is her truest artistic friend, and she taps that deep well for some incredibly strong songs that are presented gracefully whether she’s keeping things austere or adding orchestral color. Stranger starts with an unstoppable pair of singles in the swirling “Smoke Signals” and the album’s most upbeat moment, “Motion Sickness.” The former indicates an album that could’ve gone a much different way: Two clicks slicker and a bit of a dance beat, and it might be a mainstream hit ballad for someone like Ellie Goulding. But Bridgers keeps it intimate, complete with references to dead heroes—Bowie, Lemmy—and songs about loneliness (specifically The Smiths’ “How Soon Is Now”). “Motion Sickness,” meanwhile, offers the album’s only real hopping pulse and singalong chorus.

After that, it’s on to a trio of songs that will receive inevitable, justified, and flattering comparisons to another sad L.A. troubadour, Elliott Smith. “Funeral,” “Demi Moore,” and “Scott Street” are all clearly indebted to Smith—particularly that last one, which begins with a line that’s almost a direct tribute: “Walking Scott Street feeling like a stranger / with an open heart, open container.” Even though it’s close, it’s not slavish, and Bridgers pulls off the rare trick of emulating someone so singular and delicate without losing the emotion. “Killer” might even be more brutally beautiful than some of Smith’s best; on it, Bridgers is joined by X frontman John Doe, whom she asks to “kiss my rotten head and pull the plug.”

http://

If this all sounds like a depressing slog, it’s actually quite the opposite: Like the best sad-bastard music, Stranger In The Alps alchemizes sorrow into redemptive beauty. It’s never about wallowing, but about slowly moving through it. That difference, played out over some incredible, wise-beyond-her-years songwriting, makes it one of the best albums of the year.

Sometimes I feel like this record is one of the biggest risks I’ve taken in my life. But it’s the kind of risk that’s a necessity, so it doesn’t feel risky at all. From the moment the album appeared in my mind, it knew where it was going – my job was just to clear the path.
In a time of intense uncertainty, it felt good to harness a spirit of recklessness, which sometimes is the only thing that can stand up to the anxiety you would otherwise feel.
This record is about staring down dark things and seeing them fully, which isn’t the same thing as acceptance. It’s just a necessity in and of itself, and something that can empower.
It’s also about playing music with my friends, love, ideas, and everything else that chose to tumble onto the page over the last year and a half.
I’m so proud to be able to bring it to you today.  Tamara Lindeman The Weather Station.

Image may contain: plant and flower

Julien Baker’s 2015 debut Sprained Ankle earned her spare, intimate songwriting a passionate following. The title track is as close to indie classic status as a song that’s hardly two years old can be, meaning fans have eagerly awaited new material since Baker announced she’d signed to Matador Records earlier this year. She’s announced her sophomore album and first full-length for MatadorTurn Out the Lightswhich arrives October 27th.

Alongside the album announcement comes “Appointments,” the album’s second song and a slow, twinkly setting for Julien Baker’s signature confessional hush. listen to the song below,

Stranger in the Alps artwork

L.A. singer-songwriter Phoebe Bridgers’ debut LP is a collection of songs about intimacy, documenting how our relationships affect the way we view ourselves and interact with others.

Phoebe Bridgers’ career has been propelled by fellow musicians. Ryan Adams, Conor Oberst, and Julien Baker have all sung the praises of the 23-year-old Los Angeles singer-songwriter, leading up to her full-length debut Stranger in the Alps. Fittingly, the album itself is also populated by other artists: Bridgers writes about lost legends like Bowie and Lemmy down through the local hobbyists who haunt their hometowns like ghosts in faded band tees. In “Scott Street,” she reads into how an old flame tells her his drums are “too much shit to carry.” In “Motion Sickness,” one of the year’s most exquisite breakup anthems, she lands her harshest jab in the chorus: “Hey, why do you sing with an English accent? I guess it’s too late to change it now.”

Stranger in the Alps is a collection of songs about intimacy, documenting how our relationships affect the way we view ourselves and interact with others. The crux of Bridgers’ writing arrives in small details: a casual exchange of words, a song played on a long car ride, the moments we relive in our heads once we get back home. Bridgers’ voice has a breezy, conversational flutter that helps her stories of heartbreak and loss avoid morbidity. She sounds best when she double-tracks it in layers of light falsetto: an effect that, depending on what she’s singing, can sound sweet and soothing or scalding like feedback