Posts Tagged ‘Cleo Tucker’

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The music Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad release as Girlpool occupies a transient space. Their constant evolution makes it perfectly impossible to articulate exactly where their project falls within the contemporary musical canon; this is one of the many reasons Girlpool’s music is so captivating.
Never before has a group’s maturation been so transparently attached to the maturation of its members. This is due in large part to the fact that Girlpool came into existence exactly when Girlpool was supposed to come into existence: at the most prolific stage of the digital revolution. Both online and in the flesh, Tividad and Tucker practice radical openness to the point where it may even engender discomfort; this is exactly the point where it becomes clear why theirs’ is such a special project: they accept the possibility of discomfort—Chaos—and show you how to figure out why you might feel it. This is achieved through their ability to empathize as best friends and partners in creation, with the intention of making music that provokes.

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Our new album ‘What Chaos is Imaginary’ will be released 2.1.2019 on Anti Records

Release date:8th January 2019

 

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Girlpool have shared “Hire,” their first single off their newly announced forthcoming album What Chaos Is Imaginary, due out February. 1st, 2019, on ANTI- Records.

“Hire” follows the pair of songs Girlpool released earlier this year, “Lucy’s” and “Where You Sink.” While “Hire” is a more rollicking ride, it shares a tenderness with those previous releases. The central revelation of all of these songs is co-vocalist Cleo Tucker’s voice—Tucker transitioned after the band’s last album, and their voice is now a hearty, wounded baritone. The band’s signature harmonies feel weightier, Tucker’s vocals landing with heft while Harmony Tividad’s ethereal coos swirl overhead.

“Hire” finds Tucker maxing out their dynamic range, slowly raising the stakes from hop-along valleys of groove to scorching peaks of winding screams. The possibilities raised by the band’s new vocal dynamics are far-reaching, and “Hire” is a bracing proof of concept.

Listen to “Hire” The band will be touring with Hatchie in 2019

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“Hire” by Girlpool from the album ‘What Chaos Is Imaginary,’ available February 1st

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Girlpool full-band transformation has illuminated its raw sound in deep and unexpected ways, as heard on last year’s Powerplant. In addition to “Picturesong” — a one-off single with Blood-Orange” Dev Hynes Harmony Tividad and Cleo Tucker have continued to explore different textures in self-released solo recordings, which provide clues for a pair of new Girlpool songs out now.

“Where You Sink” first appeared on Tividad’s Oove Is Rare as a quiet acoustic track, but here gets transformed into dream-pop at a clop-along drum-machine beat. The song coos sweetly as it puzzles over human desire. Tividad writes in a press release:

“Where You Sink” explores our fixations on characters in our lives and the projections we create. It explores our natural human desire to be made special by another. I wrote it when I found myself looking at one person from various angles (emotionally); I found them to be beautiful in toxic but charismatic ways. It’s about loving someone who you don’t really have the chance to get to know fully because their time is spent trying to get out of their head, further from reality. It explores the complications of trying to get close to someone who ultimately wants to be far from themselves.”

“Lucy’s,” likewise, also appeared on a solo recording — now deleted — from Cleo Tucker. Girlpool’s version turns inward with big, jagged, Polvo-style guitar chords as Tucker ponders “stubborn feelings from a past relationship”

I wrote “Lucy’s” a couple of years ago to sort through some droning thoughts about hope, distraction and love. “I swear I’ll be all right / Although (you) are in the sky,” continues to resonate. These lyrics distinguish a time when my partner would check out from our relationship. I reassured myself that even when they were not present, and I was, that I would be all right. I was hopeful that my partner would find resolve from their struggles, which stifled their capacity to provide the kind of care and attention that I needed. I practiced nurture, and I hoped that they would find the ambition that I saw in them.

Girlpool is an indie rock band from Los Angeles, California. Its members are Cleo Tucker (guitar, vocals) and Harmony Tividad (bass, vocals). Their self-titled debut EP was posted on their Bandcamp account in 2014, and re-released on Wichita Recordings later that year. The band released its debut album, Before the World Was Big, in 2015, also on Wichita Recordings. Their second album, Powerplant, was released in 2017, via Anti- Records. They added a drummer, Miles Wintner, on their Powerplant album.

Girlpool

While Girlpool’s songs have always been populated by infectious harmonies and quotable lyrics, their music itself has never been more communicative than on their sophomore album, Powerplant. Cleo Tucker plays guitar with an inventive intensity, stringing together melodies that wander off into unexpected places and echo back against Harmony Tividad’s bobbing basslines. Powerplant plays like an intricate conversation between two artists with an uncanny ability to finish each other’s thoughts.

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fyffest: “JUST ANNOUNCED: Girlpool will be playing their album release show for the upcoming record “Before the World Was Big” at the Center for the Arts, Eagle Rock on Monday, June 1st. All attendees will receive a special mixtape created by Harmony...

Girlpool have released a video for ‘Powerplant’, the title track from the long-awaited follow-up to the band’s debut album. Relatable songs about growing up as a regular gal and learning to be confident while simultaneously figuring yourself out.

Video director, Philip Steiger says “the music video is a meta-narrative nightmare exploring the power dynamics and manipulation behind an insincere candidness.”

Powerplant is available for pre-order now and out via ANTI- Records on May 12th.

It’s fair to worry that the raw quality of Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad’s voices might get muddled with the addition of drums to Girlpool’s signature guitar-only sound. A full band isn’t necessarily the key to a great record, but in the case of the duo’s sophomore release Powerplant, a full band allows Girlpool to reach higher, deeper — even rawer — potential. Their eager and observational lyrics once again come alive with harmonies that stab you in the gut. With Girlpool you can be silly and serious at the same time. You can use jokes and poetic one-liners to express disenchantment and frustration with your surroundings. As time goes on and Tividad and Tucker enter their early 20s, they’ve become even more in-sync than before,

The band has also announced a full European tour in September .

Listen to the full album “Powerplant” by Girlpool available now

Powerplant

“It Gets More Blue” is a song about how manic we can get when it comes to matters of the heart, and it demonstrates how Tucker and Tividad’s songwriting has matured since 2015’s “Before The World Was Big” Between albums, they’ve worked hard on filling out their sound—including adding drums to the mix, a giant departure for these two. It’s no longer just the naked sounds of Tividad and Tucker’s bass and guitar. There are little bursts of distortion, sweet guitar solos, chewy bass riffs, and quite a bit of echo. (If you were to just listen to the instrumental, you might think you were hearing a long-lost Pavement song.) The duo have also changed their delivery: Here, they’ve raised the volume of their voices to a bellow rather than a whisper, making the song all the more anthemic. Girlpool’s music has always seemed like an opportunity to peek into Tividad and Tucker’s private universe, and with “It Gets More Blue,” they open the door.

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Last month, Philly two-piece Girlpool announced a new album “Powerplant” , a new LP the band describes as embracing a “devastating emotional pragmatism.” That emphasis is clear in their latest single, “It Gets More Blue”, which exudes a sepia-toned melancholy without sacrificing the urgent riffage of the band’s sound.

Directed by Amalia Irons from a concept by the band’s Harmony Tividad, the accompanying music video sets outsized emotional theatrics .

“It Gets More Blue” by Girlpool from the album ‘Powerplant,’ available May 12th

Girlpool Debuts “123,” Their New Album’s Totally Gorgeous Opener

The new Girlpool song, “123,” starts like a lot of other Girlpool songs. Its quietly strumming opening guitar melody reminds me a bit of “Chinatown,” one of Harmony Tividad and Cleo Tucker’s best-loved tracks. But then, at around 50 seconds, the drums kick in. It’s our first taste of the full-band sound heard all over Girlpool’s ridiculously good new album, “Powerplant”. And it’s a beautiful moment.
“123” first turned up as a whispery demo on Cleo’s most recent straight-to-bandcamp solo EP. That version is arresting, but this one hits like a bag of bricks; it’s proof of the specific magic that happens when their voices come together. “One two three, will you list it off to me?/ How you’re sorry you feel weird in a jubilation dream,” they sing in the song’s euphoric final stretch.
The music video, directed by Nick Rattigan, is debuting above too. Harmony and Cleo both appear in the weirdly lovable clip, which, according to an email from the band, explores “a relationship that simultaneously exists as toxic and loving.” It was filmed by Stumble On Tapes, the entity responsible for an iconic early live video of the duo.
After some deliberation, Harmony and Cleo have decided to release Powerplant on Anti-Records, the indie label that’s put out albums by Cass McCombs, Neko Case, Deafheaven, and Elliott Smith. It comes out May 12th,

“123” by Girlpool from the album ‘Powerplant,’ available May 12th

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The full-length debut from Girlpool, the Los Angeles based band made up of Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad, was raw, incredibly vulnerable, and brave. Working in a style that is antithetical to contemporary indie-pop music—lacking any percussion, the only instruments being electric guitar and bass—Girlpool’s sound resembles that of a conventional singer/songwriter or folk musician, a conscious decision makes the duo’s work remarkably postmodern. With subject matter that feels unapologetically personal and an artistic voice that is intelligently observant, Girlpool’s lyrics on Before The World Was Big evoke a nuanced sensitivity and an enlightened perspective about the total awkwardness that constitutes young adulthood.

The world is fucking huge! That realization usually hits us sometime in our teens, and we start to come to terms with the fact that we’ll never get to go everywhere we want to go or do everything we want to do. It’s such an old way of thinking when we’re young setting ourselves up for disappointment before anything happens and Girlpool’s debut often feels like yearning for a life that’s too short. The duo is out there seeing the world now, but this album was mostly written before any of that seemed like a possibility. They sound both impossibly young and already world weary.

The debut album by Girlpool came out 1st June 2015 (2nd June in the US) on Wichita Recordings worldwide.

Available to pre-order now on Wichita store – CD + LP includes a signed poster, Directed by Allyssa Yohana. Taken from Girlpool’s debut album, “Before The World Was Big”, Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad, the two members of this band, are products of LA’s still-teeming DIY punk scene, but they don’t have to play loud to be heard. And they’ve since relocated to recent DIY mecca Philadelphia, but while they’re nearly as tuneful as their big-sister band Waxahatchee, they haven’t lost any of their basement-hardcore urgency. Instead, they sing songs about feminism and friendship and fucking assholes, their voices in nyah-nyah close harmony over their minimal guitar-and-bass backdrops. They don’t have a drummer because they’re too punk to need a drummer.

Girlpool performing “Crowded Stranger” at Sofar London on June 10th, 2015. SoFar  put on more than 10 shows every month in London, with filmed sessions. Girlpool make songs that feel audaciously small, like an eyedropper pointed toward the heavens. The 10 songs on the debut album “Before the World Was Big” not only employ a bare minimum of chords (two, pretty much always) but a minimum of notes. If you’d never held a guitar, or even seen one, you could be gently coached to play “Ideal World”, the album’s opening track, within three minutes of being handed one. The same is true of many others. And yet, Before the World Was Big brims with a mysterious power, a charged and palpable sense of hope and awe. Focusing on the clean bones of the songs only leads you to be astonished by how full they feel. This is music with no corners, no hidden places in the arrangements, and the emotions emerge with gratifying clarity. Harmony Tividad and Cleo Tucker—who sing occasionally in harmony and occasionally in unison, but always together .To listen to Before the World Was Big is to meet their gaze and feel slightly unnerved and exhilarated. It is a quiet album of uncommon intensity.

Tividad and Tucker formed Girlpool when they were 17 and 18, and they told anyone who asked them at the time that they were drawn to each other for their shared sense of purpose: “We wanted something that was honest and straightforward,” Tucker said. “We both wanted to be super vulnerable…Because of the stripped down nature of our music, if one of us messes up, it’s incredibly noticeable. We’re not trying to hide.” In part, it is this clarity of purpose that resounds from the empty spaces on their debut LP. Their EP was shouted, and in its hardy squall, you could hear two powerful voices honing in on some way they might make a dent in the universe.