Posts Tagged ‘Charles Moothart’

Ty Segall

If First Taste is your, well, first taste of Ty Segall, it might be easy to brush him off as self-indulgent noise rock. The album is overly-produced and as gaudy as a paisley shirt, sure, but it’s also immensely compelling, inventive and fascinatingly unhinged, all while still maintaining a tight control and an understanding of how to reign it all in to create an actual song from the mire of noise

“Ice Plant” is Segall at his most sparing. Gone are the fuzzy freak-fests and instrumental meltdowns; here are the airy vocal harmonies. Shannon Lay, the newest member of the rotating Freedom Band, duets with Segall on the track. Her voice is a lovely match for Segall’s, together imbuing the repeated refrain “Let your love rain down on me” with a disarming affect. Simple percussion and pianos bookend the song, which is otherwise entirely vocal.

On the toes of a 10-week residency at the Teragram Ballroom and the release of his brand new album, “First Taste”, Psych/Garage Rock virtuoso Ty Segall came by the KCRW Studio for his 5th MBE Session! 5 sessions in almost as many years and something like 15 albums, not including albums from other bands he plays with and/or is a part of, Ty Segall is like a cosmic beam of pure rock-n-roll energy.

With his Freedom Band mates – Emmett Kelly, Ben Boye, Charles Moothart, Mikal Cronin and Shannon Lay – plus a deep set up with doubles of everything, from two drum kits and bass guitars to kotos, omnichords and bazukis, Segall played all new work from First Taste for almost 40 mins.

Although the new work is undeniably Ty Segall, the instrumental set up pushes the boundaries of the fuzzy, more traditional Garage sound into a hazy world psychedelic and proto-prog rock vibe.  Like, for all the T.Rex and Stooges action and Hawkwind nods.

A number of KCRW friends and colleagues watched the performance from the Mezzanine while absolutely face-melted and slack-jawed. I know for a fact that I was making a really gross stank face for most of the set because the grooves were so disgusting and the bass, drums, and SAX were gut churning. It was a beastly trip and I LITERALLY CANNOT emphasize this enough…GO SEE THEM.

They opened the set with a full on ripper, “Taste,” and followed it up by leaning into a loping, skronky groover “Whatever” before getting to the first of our live highlights, “Ice Plant.”

Possibly one of the loveliest tracks in this dude’s oeuvre, “Ice Plant,” which has serious Marc Bolan meets Syd Barrett in Strawberry Fields vibes, wistfully floats on a mellotron-ish mist of keys and Ooos and Aahs before exploding into a super glammy freak-out. Like finding a lit firecracker in your banana split.

The set kept steam rolling through everyone’s faces and guts with “The Fall” and “I Worship The Dog,” during and after which the preternaturally boy-faced Segall kept panting and occasionally barking. He’s a grown ass man, but so help me, if I could’ve, I would’ve pinched his cheeks. They then went into “The Arms” which is probably the most straight-ahead Psych/Garage tune they played, however the high pitched Bazuki phrases really lit the track up with Turkish Psych vibes that made me wanna lay down on the carpet and go for a ride. It was really, really nice.

The band kept in that mode with “I Sing Them” before closing with the seriously heady “Self Esteem,” which I imagine is what you’d get if you crash landed a plane on a desert island with a bunch of marching band kids and they had nothing to eat but psychedelics and Can and Yes records. It was a riot and made me wish I could watch it all over again immediately.

Drag City Records. Released on: 23rd July 2019.

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CFM is the project of one Charles Moothart, the California garage-rocker who plays in Ty Segall’s Freedom Band, Fuzz, and GØGGS. Last week, he released his third album as CFM, “Soundtrack For An Empty Room”, much of which he write while out on tour with Segall. And today, he’s sharing a new video for the dreamily psychedelic LP cut “Greenlight,” a black-and-white clip that follows a deformed humanoid wandering a desert landscape. As Moothart explained to The song “Greenlight” comes from a very vulnerable and surreal place in my mind. I wanted the visual experience to have a dreamlike quality similar to some Kenneth Anger movies. Josh had the idea for the humanoid wandering through a surreal feeling wasteland, and I thought the idea was great. Josh and Star did an amazing job making it feel like a dream sequence of confusion and conflict which is essentially what this song is to me.

From the new LP: Soundtrack To An Empty Room Available now at www.intheredrecords.com

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Ty Segall presents a new single “Radio,” from his forthcoming album, “First Taste”, due August 2nd! Just in time for the July 4th festivities (such as they are), “Radio” should satisfy all our barely-subsumed bloodlust and immutable desire to rule while also providing a majestically boomboxable anthem to revel along with at the cookout.

“Radio” sizzles with koto by Segall, saxophone and piano by Mikal Cronin, bass by Emmett Kelly, percussion and drums by Segall and Charles Moothart, and back up vocals by Shannon Lay.

“‘Radio’ is a science non-fiction song,” says Segall. “We live in a Cronenberg film. It has Videodrome saxoheadphones. I am a slave to the new radio and so are you.”

First Taste is an introspective set for Ty Segall after the extroversions of 2018’s Freedom’s Goblin, yet just as steeped in hard beats. These twelve songs form a tightly revolving cycle of song and sound. Throughout, Segall reflects on family, re-encountering pasts, anticipating futures, and hits on oneness, self-esteem and the parents, while reaching outward, feeling for a shared pulse in the world around him.

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Segall will play First Taste in full, alongside select albums from his expansive catalogue, in LA, New York, and select European cities with residencies starting this month and going through the end of the year.

A first taste of Ty? Hardly, but First Taste erects extreme new sonic skylines for Segall to soar over. His natural state of urgency is paired with a thirsty contemplative vibe as Ty examines both sides now, twisting some of his best songs and production wack into hard left turns both sweet and hot.
Releases August 2nd, 2019

GØGGS: <i>Pre-Strike Sweep</i> Review

Ty Segall’s record as a rocker is nearly unimpeachable. The guy makes tons of great music, seemingly for the right reasons. He is, by all accounts, a good dude who just happens to eat, sleep and breathe psychedelic garage rock. He is almost universally beloved. He is a giant of the underground scene. It is easy, however, to imagine his band GØGGS as the answer to the question: “What would Too Much Ty Segall sound like?”

GØGGS—founded by Segall and throaty Ex-Cult vocalist Chris Shaw is a good band, and Pre Strike Sweep is a solid, bracing blast of adventurous punk rock.

Indeed, there are a lot of things to like here. Throughout, Segall needs only six strings and some electricity to conjure up killer guitar sounds, from the subterranean riffs that power “Killing Time” to the prickly noise that permeates the title track to the whiplash thrash of “Space Rinse.” His lead lines are menacing and deliberate on “Vanity,” but bright and razor-sharp on “Morning Reaper.” You get the sense that he could do this in his sleep, though it never sounds like he’s sleepwalking through a session.

GØGGS’ rhythm section include bassist Michael Anderson and drummer Charles Moothart handles its business across Pre Strike Sweep, whether that means driving the song melodically (“Still Feeding”), locking into a groove (“Ruptured Line”) or simply playing the role of anchor (“Burned Entrance”) and letting Segall soar and Shaw do what he does best.

In the end, it’s Shaw’s vocals that distinguish GØGGS from other garage/punk acts, just as they do in Ex-Cult. He is limited melodically, but has a gift for using his voice as a battering ram, whether he’s speak-singing, as in “CTA,” or howling through a throat full of gravel, as he does on “Disappear.” He’s a terrific frontman, and his style provides a perfect contrast to Segall’s feedback squalls and squiddly-diddly-diddly proclivities.

Add up the last three paragraphs and you’ll almost certainly come to the conclusion that this is a positive review of a pretty good record. And again, it is. But it’s also the third Segall-related album review of the year.

So there’s a lot of competition and comparison that can happen when it comes time to assess one of his records, and very little from Pre Strike Sweep leaps from the speakers. It shred and stomps ably, but it doesn’t feel special. Instead, it roars by for a half-hour and then it’s gone, and whatever thrills it delivers dissipate quickly.

Pre Strike Sweep

In 2016, the ever-prolific Ty Segall announced the formation of a new band with FUZZ’s Charles Moothart and Chris Shaw of Ex-Cult.Calling themselves GØGGS, the gang released an agressive LP aping the ’80s hardcore on which they were raised. Now, with Michael Anderson joining them on bass, the supergroup has announced their second album offering, Pre Strike Sweep , Gøggs add a new level of primordial anxiety to their already catastrophic symphony.

Shaw handled the lyrics, while the band collaborated to create its fierce, spine-rattling arrangements. The title track, which the band has shared alongside the announcement, unfolds across four chaotic minutes, with a steady river of distortion coursing through a peripatetic storm of squeals, effects, and one killer solo.

recorded and mixed in 2017 by Gøggs guitarist and co-founder Ty Segall, the album explores the damaging affects of modern life before blowing them up one by one. singer Chris Shaw uses terms like “space rinse” and “roadside surgery” to inform the listener that this is a strange and different trip, far and away from the “glendale junkyard” he romanticized in 2016 on their self-titled album. in fact, all expectations brought on by that acclaimed debut are crushed into dust, revealing a new standard by which the Gøggs march thumps.

Pre Strike Sweep is the title track off of GØGGS second album. Out 9/28/18 on In The Red Records.

Want loud? Los Angeles-based power trio Fuzz does that, pounding out relentless, ear-splitting riffs with abandon. But they do more, too. For starters, Fuzz is a guitar band par excellence. Name another band where every member—even the drummer—is a guitar-playing badass. Team Fuzz dominates the new wave of SoCal garage-punk-psychedelic-stoner-rock. They are prolific, restless, enigmatic, ubiquitous—their combined output is prodigious—and they’re forever releasing, touring, or supporting something.

At their core, Fuzz is simple enough. Ty Segall (singer, songwriter, guitarist, and solo artist) sings and plays drums. Chad Ubovich (guitar and vocals with the Meatbodies, guitar and bass with Mikal Cronin) holds down the low end. And Charles Moothart (guitar with Ty Segall, GØGGS, and more) plays guitar and is the band’s primary riff generator. With so many different projects, maintaining focus could be difficult. Moothart says it isn’t. “Fuzz is a very specific sound so it’s an easy thing to separate in that way,

Ty Segall’s band Fuzz play Burgerama, pay homage to Woody Allen. Fuzz is a band consisting of guitarist Charles Moothart (Moonhearts / Ty Segall Band) & drummer Ty Segall. Fuzz was formed as an outlet for Moothart’s affection for serious, heavy riffage a’la Black Sabbath, Blue Cheer & Jerusalem. Live they are augmented by bassist Chad Ubovich (Meatbodies / Mikal Cronin band)