Posts Tagged ‘Chad Ubovich’

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Ty Segall’s proto-metal-style power trio Fuzz were supposed to be on tour right now supporting their third album, including two February shows in NYC. Those dates, which had already been postponed from the summer, have been postponed again, but to tide you over they’ve taped a short live set at Gold Diggers Studio 1 in Los Angeles and have shared it with the world.

The band, which feature Ty Segall on Drums/vox, Charles Moothart on guitar/vox and Chad Ubovich on bass/vox, plow through four songs — “Nothing People,” “Mirror,” “Close Your Eyes,” and “Loose Sutures.” Says label In the Red, “This performance will be available on our youtube page for a limited time only. From the Wolf Moon to the Snow Moon, to be exact (1/28/21 – 2/27/21).”

Surprise!! In The Red Records is proud to present to you a brand new live set from Fuzz, recorded here in Los Angeles at Gold Diggers Studio 1. Why? Simply for your enjoyment. This performance will be available on our youtube page for a limited time only. From the Wolf Moon to the Snow Moon, to be exact (1/28/21 – 2/27/21). Enjoy! Set list: Nothing People Mirror Close Your Eyes Loose Sutures

Fuzz have now rescheduled the dates for April, which also doesn’t seem very likely to happen, but who knows?

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Fuzz, the psych-rock project of Ty Segall, guitarist Charles Moothart, and bassist Chad Ubovich, have announced their first album in five years. Entitled suprisingly III, the eight-track affair is due out 23rd October through In The Red records.

“III” both active and reactive. Charles Moothart, Ty Segall and Chad Ubovich are Fuzz. Fuzz is three. and III has returned. songs for all, and music for one. III was recorded and mixed at united recording under the sonic lordship of Steve Albini. Keeping the focus on the live sounds of the band, the use of overdubs and studio tricks were kept to a minimum. Albini’s mastery in capturing sound gave the trio the ability to focus entirely on the playing while knowing the natural sounds would land. it takes the essential ingredients of “guitar-based music” and “rock and roll power trio” and puts them right out on the chopping block. it was a much more honest approach for the band. Three humans getting primitive, staying primitive. the goal was never to reinvent the wheel. sometimes it’s just about seeing how long one can hold on before getting thrown off. three points reflected in three mirrors; a pyramid of sonic destruction and psychic creation. Nothing people feed the roots while the freaks fly free in the treetops—blind to vines, eyes closed, stuck in spit, triumphing the returning of beginnings and ends returning while beginning to see the time collapse. Love is the only way to annihilate hate, and sketchy freaks live to bleed. all shades of colour, truth and lies,III is the pillar of unity and singularity. all is nothing, and only nothing can generate everything. log out, drop thought, turn up.

Speaking on Returning in a statement, Fuzz described the song as “an auditory meditation on the power of one and the different perspectives of one”, relating the song to the band’s long-awaited return.

“Whether it is the singular person looking inward, or a group of people coming together as a single unit. As the opening track of the record, it serves as a sort of mission statement or mantra for the album. Not only is it an echo of the return of Fuzz, but also a broader return to form – raw and empowered through vulnerability. In order to maintain a focus on the Fuzz’s live sound, Albini encouraged a minimum in overdubs and studio trickery.

This isn’t the first time that Segall and Albini have crossed paths, as the engineer also recorded Segall’s 2017 self-titled record. From the upcoming album “III”. Out 10/23/20 on In The Red Records. The third album the collaborative limbs of Ty Segall, Charles Moothart and Chad Ubovich as Fuzz. Strap in. To celebrate this ferocious release, we have produced a very limited, special edition on transparent green vinyl that includes a numbered A3 risograph poster, a custom petrol eggshell Fuzz sticker and guitar pick.

III by FUZZ is available for pre-order now through intheredrecords.com The trio have supplied a first taste of their latest album with the release of the single Returning .

Fuzz

Meatbodies performing live in the KEXP studio. Recorded November 19, 2014.

Chad Ubovich spent the last few years as a member of Ty Segall and Mikal Cronin‘s respective backing bands. Along the way, he’s learned to put his personal spin on the surf-strum mutant beach party championed by California psychedelic rock bands like Thee Oh Sees, Wand and Bleached.

As Meatbodies, Ubovich’s lessons pay off. Listening to the band, fans of Ty Segall and his coterie will no doubt find similarities — the obvious nods to ’60s dream-time dementia, cultish lyrical enticements, the cartoonish narcissism of glam rock, the positioning of an acoustic guitar against heaps of fuzz and delay. That’s fine. People don’t expect a revelation in rock ‘n’ roll so much as they demand a good time. But Ubovich finds ways to differentiate his music, and in doing so gets to have it both ways.

You can tell he’s a bassist by trade, as the rhythmic imperative on his self-titled debut hardly ever lets up; it’s dialed into mosh-pit velocity while driving songs with metallic edges (the twinned lead guitars of “Mountain,” for example) into controlled bursts of frenzy. Someone has already knocked the drink out of your hand, but Meatbodies’ poignant middle section will have you staring at patterns from the lights dancing off the liquid now covering the floor.

meatbodies

Elsewhere the sturdy two-chord riff structures recall an earlier SoCal sensation, Rocket From The Crypt, if it had replaced its horn section with two more guitarists and played everything much faster and heavier. Meatbodies plays off this energy, which dips only by design and comes racing back anew, recharged and ready to slam heads together. Ubovich applies these lessons to perfection in “Off,” four and a half minutes of bug-eyed melodic pogo-punk that’s been jammed into a quick-shifting chorus and peppered with whammy-bar fratricide and finger-shredding hammer-ons designed to knock the wind out of anyone in earshot. The record closes, fittingly, with “The Master,” a massive coda of delay and noise that shoots the curl against the driving, steady beat, sounding for all the world like Ubovich is trying to trigger the next big earthquake.

Songs:
Mountain
Him
Wahoo
Tremmors