Posts Tagged ‘Wayne Coyne’

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Once Wayne Coyne saw Runnin’ Down a Dream, a 2007 documentary on Tom Petty, he became fixated on a stop Tom Petty made through Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1974 and his recording in that city with the earliest inception of the Heartbreakers—along with Belmont Tench and Mike Campbell—as Mudcrutch.  Manoeuvering through imagined scenarios and what-ifs, the Flaming Lips frontman became caught in some imaginary realm between his Oklahoma upbringing, the current state of America, and an imaginary jam session with the late rock legend. Imagine if the Lips were a local Oklahoma band that befriended Petty in his pre-Heartbreakers days—or what if Tom and company were pulled into the seedier side of Tulsa, shifting the course of rock history as we know it?

Running down a rabbit hole of reflections, the Lips’ sixteenth album “American Head” drifts through the singer’s wild imagination, exploring addiction and mental health in its drug-induced Americana. “As we destroy our brains / ’Til we believe we’re dead / It’s the American dream,” Coyne sings on “At the Movies on Quaaludes” before the more revelatory “Now I see the sadness in the world / I’m sorry I didn’t see it before” on “Mother I’ve Taken LSD.” Following up  Lip$haa proposed 2014 album with Kesha, and collaborating on the psych-pop experiment Miley Cyrus & Her Dead Petz in 2015, for American Head, the Lips cozied up to Kacey Musgraves for some feminine texture on three of the record’s tracks. Only The Flaming Lips could conjure up their American Head narrative, mixing loosely based recollections, romanticized tales…and the state of the country as we think we know it.

American Legends The Flaming Lips are pleased to announce the release of their 21st studio album, American Head released on September 11th via Bella Union. The album is comprised of thirteen new cinematic tracks, produced by long time collaborator Dave Fridmann and The Lips. Among them, “God and the Policeman” featuring backing vocals from country superstar Kasey Musgraves. American Head takes on a welcome temporal shift that occupies a similar space to that of The Soft Bulletin or Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots and just may be their most beautiful and consistent work to date

American Head finds The Flaming Lips basking in more reflective lyrical places as Wayne Coyne explains in a longer form story titled “We’re An American Band.”  Excerpt below:

The Flaming Lips are from Oklahoma. We never thought of ourselves as a band. I know growing up (when I was like 6 or 7 years old) in Oklahoma I was never influenced by, or was very aware of any musicians from Oklahoma. We mostly listened to the Beatles and my mother loved Tom Jones (this is in the 60’s)… it wasn’t till I was about 10 or 11 that my older brothers would know a few of the local musician dudes.

So… for most of our musical life (as The Flaming Lips starting in 1983) we’ve kind of thought of ourselves as coming from ‘Earth’… not really caring Where we were actually from. So for the first time in our musical life we began to think of ourselves as ‘AN AMERICAN BAND’… telling ourselves that it would be our identity for our next creative adventure. We had become a 7-piece ensemble and were beginning to feel more and more of a kinship with groups that have a lot of members in them. We started to think of classic American bands like The Grateful Dead and Parliament-Funkadelic and how maybe we could embrace this new vibe.

The music and songs that make up the American Head album are based in a feeling. A feeling that, I think, can only be expressed through music and songs. We were, while creating it, trying to NOT hear it as sounds… but to feel it. Mother’s sacrifice, Father’s intensity, Brother’s insanity, Sister’s rebellion…I can’t quite put it into words.

Something switches and others (your brothers and sisters and mother and father…your pets) start to become more important to you…in the beginning there is only you… and your desires are all that you can care about…but… something switches.. I think all of these songs are about this little switch.”

The Flaming Lips return on Bella Union Records with American Head, their 21st studio album. They’ve pulled off a masterstroke here, it retains all of their bubbling psychedelics, whilst sounding more introspective or reflective than they have in years. It’s a cracking set of songs and very pretty too.

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The Tiny Desk is working from home for the foreseeable future. Introducing NPR Music’s Tiny Desk (home) concerts, bringing you performances from across the country and the world. It’s the same spirit — stripped-down sets, an intimate setting — just a different space. Bob Boilen October 9th, 2020 Wayne Coyne has appeared inside a bubble for over a decade. At concerts, he’d roll over the tops of adoring fans, their outstretched hands keeping him aloft. That was novelty long ago; now it seems prescient. For this Tiny Desk (home) concert, Wayne and his fellow bandmates are seemingly quarantined from one another, with the bubble-sharing green-haired drummers and keyboards pairing off, playing together yet apart. The Flaming Lips have always embraced the surreal. Drugs are undoubtedly part of the culture, and on their new songs from “American Head”, drugs are at the core. These are songs for the lost, the overdosed dreamers, the damaged, the car crashed. On the album’s opening track “Will You Return/When You Come Down” (which also begins this concert), Steven Drozd asks in falsetto, “Will you return? Will you come down?” while Wayne Coyne responds, “Thinking back to those lost souls / And their ghosts / Floating around your bed / Hear it said / Now all your friends are dead.”

SET LIST: “Will You Return/When You Come Down” “God And The Policeman” “Be Free, A Way” “It’s Summertime”

MUSICIANS: Wayne Coyne: vocals Steven Drozd: keys, vocals Michael Ivins: bass Derek Brown: guitar, vocals Jake Ingalls: keys Matt Duckworth: drums Nicholas Ley: percussion

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The new Flaming Lips album, “American Head”  is really shaping up to be melodic, A mellow psychedelic record like we haven’t really gotten since Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots. They’ve just shared another single from it, “Will You Return / When You Come Down,” which is really lovely and comes with a video the band made during quarantine at their fully equipped AV studio and plays off the album art.
The Lips are releasing “American Head”, on September 11th via Warner Records. The video for the track that features the band performing the song in the studio in a socially distant manner. Frontman Wayne Coyne co-directed the video with regular collaborator George Salisbury.

The 5:21 minute track dances along thanks to the sparkling instrumentation and soft vocals from both Wayne Coyne and Steven Drozd. Although they’re famously known for their expressions of alternative psychedelic material, the band also once again showcases their ability to deliver a ballad rich in softer melodies. The song’s affiliated video showcases each member appearing to perform their parts in isolation, with Coyne seen in what looks to be surrounded by a clear plastic wrap of sorts.

Longtime collaborator Dave Fridmann co-produced American Head with the band. The album includes “Flowers of Neptune 6,” a new song the band shared in May via a video for the track. The song featured Kacey Musgraves on additional vocals. Musgraves also features on another American Head track, “God and the Policeman.”

When the album was announced in June, the band shared its second single, “My Religion Is You,” via a video for the song. Then they shared another song from the album, “Dinosaurs on the Mountain,”  Then they shared a fourth song from the album, “You n Me Sellin’ Weed,” .

In June, The Flaming Lips performed for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, with the entire band in separate plastic bubbles and also their audience, including some kids, in bubbles. And to make it even more timely, they did “Race for the Prize,” a classic from 1999’s The Soft Bulletin about two scientists racing to find a cure.

American Head is out September 11th via Warner Brothers.

Motorcycles and laser beams introduce a fuzzed-out mid-tempo riff to kick off the technicolor musical epic “Home Thru Hell,” the first track on Deap Lips, the new collaborative project from Deap Vally and the Flaming Lips. The song’s lyrics have fantastical tendencies alluding to classic prog-rock fare such as vultures and hypnotizer’s spells, while lines like “Riding along through the deep valley/Where the dragons of madness roam” and “Taking all my wisdom/From the flaming lips of youth” creatively shout out the band names of the two groups involved in this super-collaboration. “Home Thru Hell” acts as a bold and brilliant overture for an album that is brimming with fun and off-the-wall musical treats, including light rapping, robot voices, a Steppenwolf cover, and wild synth and guitar tones throughout.

Listening to Deap Lips, it’s easy to hear the musical characteristics of both Deap Vally and the Flaming Lips, but each band’s sounds have been so well-kneaded into the musical dough of this project that the album came out of the oven sounding truly original. It’s no surprise that this crew could cook up something fresh as both bands are seasoned collaborators: The Flaming Lips are well-known for working with a wide range of artists, from Miley Cyrus and Kesha to Mick Jones and the White Stripes, while Deap Vally have been working on a collaborative album with artists such as KT Tunstall, Peaches, and members of bands like Warpaint and Queens of the Stone Age.

As a guitar and drum two-piece, Deap Vally have just the right amount of room in their sound for two Flaming Lips to join in with synthesizers, bass, some guitars, and a handful of songs. Guitarist Lindsey Troy explains, “When you’re in a two-piece, people are always asking, ‘Will you add a third member?’ So this is our way of experimenting with that. It was fun to throw someone else in the room to change up the dynamic and it’s been great. We just thought we’d do one song with the Flaming Lips. We didn’t know it was gonna turn into a whole record, but it’s amazing that it did.”

It took some kismet for the two bands to come together. In 2016, Wayne Coyne was in Raleigh, North Carolina, meeting with the creator of the “World’s Largest Gummy Bear” about making some props for the Lips when he checked out a show by Wolfmother, where Deap Vally was opening. He tracked down Lindsey at the merch booth and the two hit it off immediately. It was only a matter of time before Lindsey hit up Coyne with the proposal to work on some music together, and in early 2018 she and drummer Julie Edwards were on their way to Wayne’s home studio, Pink Floor, to work with Coyne and fellow-Lip Steven Drozd. “We went out to Oklahoma City and stayed with Wayne at his house and wrote and recorded for five days, had a really great time, made some awesome stuff,” says Troy. “After that, he kept sending us more ideas and was eventually like, ‘Let’s do a full album.’ He’d send us stuff and we’d go into the studio in L.A. and send him stuff and that’s how the rest of it got finished.”

The Flaming Lips + Deap Vally = Deap Lips. The self-titled album is out now:

American Head Artwork

The Flaming Lips have announced a new album called “American Head”. The King’s Mouth follow-up arrives September 11th via Warner Bros Records. With (A double colored vinyl follows on October 2nd, along with limited edition art prints.) It’s produced by long time collaborator Dave Fridmann and features the Kacey Musgraves collaboration “Flowers of Neptune 6.”

In a story Wayne Coyne wrote, excerpted in the press release, he said, “The music and songs that make up the American Head album are based in a feeling. A feeling that, I think, can only be expressed through music and songs. We were, while creating it, trying to NOT hear it as sounds… but to feel it. Mother’s sacrifice, Father’s intensity, Brother’s insanity, Sister’s rebellion…. I can’t quite put it into words.”

Earlier this year, the Flaming Lips released a collaborative LP with Deap Valley, as Deap Lips. Coyne and co. recently stopped by The Late Show With Stephen Colbert, where they performed “Race for the Prize” with an actual audience, from the socially distanced confines of giant bubbles.

The Flaming Lips Announce New Album American Head Share the first song off the new album.

‘My Religion Is You’ from the upcoming album ‘American Head’ Out 9/11.

 

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The Flaming Lips and Kacey Musgraves have teamed up for a collaborative new single, “Flowers of Neptune 6”, which was released this Friday.

The relaxing, dreamy track acts as the first new material from The Flaming Lips since their collaborative album with Deap Vally arrived earlier this year. The song hears the veteran psych-rock outfit softly glide their way through its 4:31-minute runtime with Musgraves’ vocals joining along in harmonic accompaniment. “Flowers of Neptune 6” showcases the band’s trademark space-rock style while singer Wayne Coyne keeps listeners grounded with its heartfelt melodies and lyrics. The song’s video offers the same amount of subtle captivation, as Coyne is seen walking across a field–which later burns–while also wrapping himself in an American flag.

Coyne mentioned about the band’s new single, “Flowers Of Neptune 6” track started off as a very evocative series of melodies that Steven Drozd had woven together.

The first time he played it for me I was stunned by its emotional flow. The 3 sections (well they seem like sections to me) seemed to hint at an older, mature mind reflecting back into a journey from younger innocence then starting to learn and understand and keeps going into the panic of becoming one with the world. The opening lyric ‘Yellow sun is going down so slow…Doing acid and watching the light-bugs glow like tiny spaceships in a row… is the coolest thing I’ll ever know’…and is a combination of blissful, innocent, psychedelic experiences that Steven and Kacey Musgraves (she sings harmony with me on the track) and myself all discussed.

The Flaming Lips had initially announced plans for a run of west coast performances in the spring and early summer months, but those dates have–like most other live events–been postponed

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Deap Lips a collaboration between Flaming Lips and Deap Vally released their self-titled debut LP Friday, and with it the project’s colorful video for their cover of Steppenwolf’s Easy Rider classic “The Pusher.”

Since the Oklahoma City psych-rockers and the Los Angeles rock duo first announced their collaboration in December, the project has released tracks “Hope Hell High” and “Home Thru Hell.”

“I can’t remember exactly when I became aware of Deap Vally… but let’s say it was sometime just before I saw them play,” Wayne Coyne previously said in a statement of the collaboration, which pairs him and the Lips’ Steven Drozd with Deap Vally’s Lindsey Troy and Julie Edwards. “I was in Raleigh visiting with the creator of the World’s Largest Gummy Bear, and so getting to experience Deap Vally was just one more cool thing of many cool things that were happening to me. Deap Vally really rocked the mostly all dude crowd that was there to scream to WolfMother. I met Lindsey that night and we both were glad we met. Deap Vally got my phone number and about a year later hit me up, out of the blue … and invited themselves to come to Oklahoma City and jam with us and maybe come up with a couple songs for their ‘collaboration’ album that they were working on.” Coyne added that their “The Pusher” cover was previously considered for one of Miley Cyrus’ projects with the Flaming Lips but ultimately ended up on Deap Lips.

The Flaming Lips + Deap Vally = DEAP LIPS.

The Flaming Lips + Deap Vally = DEAP LIPS. Our new single is out now. Listen to ‘Home Thru Hell’ & pre-order the album today.

The Flaming Lips have a long-standing tradition of collaborating with other artists for full albums. Now, Wayne Coyne and Steven Drozd have teamed up with Deap Vally’s Lindsey Troy and Julie Edwards to form a new supergroup called Deap Lips. Their new album Deap Lips is out March 13th via Cooking Vinyl.

In the past, the Flaming Lips have shared collaborative albums with Miley Cyrus, Neon Indian, Stardeath & White Dwarf, and a whole slew of “heady fwends.” This year they dropped the new album King’s Mouth and a live orchestral Soft Bulletin album.

The Flaming Lips + Deap Vally = DEAP LIPS. The self-titled album releases March 13th, 2020.

The Flaming Lips have teamed up with LA rockers Deap Vally (Lindsey Troy and Julie Edwards) to create a brand new supergroup called, appropriately, Deap Lips. They’ll be releasing an album March 13th via Cooking Vinyl, and today they’ve revealed the psychedelic lead single “Hope Hell High” Listen to it below.

Wayne Coyne and Steven Drozd of the band have paired up with Deap Vally’s Lindsey Troy and Julie Edwards for Deap Lips.

The Flaming Lips are no strangers to collaboration, having previously paired with the likes of Neon Indian, Miley Cyrus, and Stardeath and White Dwarfs. Earlier this year they released new record King’s Mouth and a live album called The Soft Bulletin—and clearly show no signs of slowing down in the new year.

Their eponymous album will be released on March 13th, 2020.

It’s not the first time The Flaming Lips have collaborated with artists for full albums.

The Flaming Lips 'The Soft Bulletin'

In October, members of Vinyl Me, Please Essentials will receive an exclusive 20th-Anniversary Edition of The Flaming Lips’ The Soft Bulletin. Made in close collaboration with Wayne Coyne, this new edition comes on color vinyl, and is pressed from new lacquers cut by Ryan Smith at Sterling Sound, and comes with a lenticular cover insert. The art print was also picked by Wayne Coyne himself. You can sign up to receive it here.

Alex Berenson, A&R for VMP: That run from “Suddenly Everything Has Changed” to “The Gash” and “Feeling Yourself Disintegrate” is just devastating. It’s so good, but it’s heartwrenching. This is the record I used to listen to when I went through big life changes: When I moved from New York to Denver to work at VMP, this is all I listened to. I listened to “Suddenly Everything Has Changed” over and over because that’s how my life felt. I get really emotional when I listen to this album.

No, no, not like a crazy person: I think that really speaks to how personally we feel the projects we’re working on. This wasn’t a, “Oh, this album has an anniversary coming up” type of deal; we did this because you, and all of us, really, have really personal stories with this album. I remember finding it the first time when my mom was really sick when I was like 19-20, and the songs are like a big blanket of reassurance, in a way.

You worked on this album for a long time to make it happen this month, how long ago did we start this one? A year ago? Yeah, at least a year ago, but I know that I had it in the back of my mind since I started working here. So I guess call it three years.

If somebody doesn’t have any Flaming Lips records, why should someone listen to this one?

To me, this is their magnum opus. I love all their albums for different reasons, but everything on this album works with each other to deliver this whole experience. They worked on this a bunch to make it sound as good as it does. It has so many layers, and every time you listen there’s a new part that’s your favorite, or you learn more about.

Yeah, because in some ways, this album was their last chance; they were this major label band that hadn’t had a hit except for “She Don’t Use Jelly,” and the album before this was Zaireeka, an album basically impossible to listen to in full unless you had 4 CDs. That this personal, wrenching album was their breakthrough is kind of miraculous.

We worked really closely with Wayne Coyne to make this happen, Yeah, Wayne and the folks at WEA have been great partners on this. Wayne picked the color of the vinyl, suggested the holograph lenticular cover, and gave us the art print. We have some special things planned with VMP subscribers and Wayne, so get ready for that.

This one was recorded straight to DAT, so there aren’t master tapes to remaster, but we did have new lacquers cut by Ryan Smith at Sterling Sound, and it sounds amazing, but this is the definitive edition.