Posts Tagged ‘Wild Nothing’

Molly Burch’s previous records had a distinctly twangy vibe to them that had her compared to Patsy Cline and other ’60s country singers. But starting with last year’s cover of Ariana Grande’s “Needy,” she’s been heading in poppier directions. New single “Emotion,” which she co-wrote and recorded with Wild Nothing’s Jack Tatum, takes her into disco territory with popping bass and sultry vocals. “For me, the theme of the song is about feeling a spectrum of emotions, embracing that sensitivity, and using it as fuel to create something positive,” says Molly. “‘Emotion’ is a celebration of being alive.”

Austin singer and songwriter Molly Burch returns this new year with a fresh sound on “Emotion’’, a disco-tinged, dynamic shot of adrenaline produced by Captured Tracks label-mate Wild Nothing (Jack Tatum).

In January 2020, Burch headed to Tatum’s hometown of Richmond, Virginia, looking to write new material with a distinct pop sound and production in mind. Sharing some of her latest demos and a playlist of her favourite pop bangers with Tatum, they set out to make a heart-pumping dance track of their own. On “Emotion”, Burch’s voice is as strong and masterful as ever, pairing a lighter, polished vocal performance – a surprising, but captivating departure from her signature smoky delivery – with Tatum’s compelling bass lines, beats, and shimmering synths. Burch says, “for me, the theme of the song is about feeling a spectrum of emotions, embracing that sensitivity, and using it as fuel to create something positive. “Emotion” is a celebration of being alive.”
 
Released January 1st, 2021

Molly Burch “Emotion” feat. Wild Nothing · available on Captured Tracks Released on: 2021-01-01

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Gemini was released as part of the 2010 guitar-pop mini-boom, but it could just as easily have been recorded in 1989. Jack Tatum’s first album as Wild Nothing is full of songs that exist just outside the margins of your memory: Haven’t I heard this before? Isn’t this guitar part familiar? Didn’t an ex-boyfriend make me a mixtape with “Drifter” sandwiched between Cocteau Twins deep cuts?,

The Version is a new, limited edition of the vinyl. Pressed on translucent blue vinyl, the album is housed in a silkscreened jacket with hand-stamped numbering and includes new liner notes from Tatum along with a 11″ x 17″ show poster from 2010.

From Jack Tatum:

“It’s fitting that listening back [to Gemini] now feels like a dream to me. I know I wrote these songs, but the memories of making them have become as blurred as the music,” says Tatum. “It’s such a rare thing to have this kind of living document of your youth and I think that’s what Gemini will always be for me: a part of my life that is at once so familiar and so unrecognizable.”

Tatum put Gemini together while studying at Virginia Tech, and its amateurish charm separates the album from his more expansive, polished later work. When songs like opener “Live in Dreams” and the chiming “Our Composition Book” fade in slowly, it’s easy to imagine hearing them streaming from a dorm room window overlooking a verdant quad. And while there isn’t much lyrical depth to Gemini, that’s a feature, not a bug. You can listen to “Summer Holiday” or the gloomy, glamorous “Chinatown” and fill in the blanks with your own memories of being young, sad, and in love.

“Summer Holiday” · Wild Nothing “Gemini” Released on Captured Tracks

 

jack tatum of wild nothing seated

On Laughing Gas, the third EP from Wild Nothing, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Jack Tatum delves deeper into the territory where he thrives: namely, the synth and sophisti-pop of the 1980s. Working within a more mechanical and synthetic framework than his previous releases, Wild Nothing continues to delicately toe the line between the organic and the unnatural. These are still pop songs, but there’s an underlying sense of uneasiness that threads the music together.

Recorded in Los Angeles, CA and Richmond, VA with the help of Jorge Elbrecht, these five songs were originally imagined alongside last year’s Indigo and were written and tracked simultaneously with the album. When work on the full-length was nearing completion, Tatum set these ideas aside; they seemed to fit better on their own. In spare moments between tours, Tatum began to look back and piece the songs together at his home studio in Richmond, reconnecting with Elbrecht to mix the EP. With Elbrecht in Denver and Tatum in Richmond, the two went back and forth on the final touches, molding a common thread from the Lo Borges inspired new wave of Sleight Of Hand to the propulsive, icy synth funk of Foyer.

Often considered a secondary or transitional format, Wild Nothing has always used the EP to further explore new ideas and influences. Laughing Gas is no exception.

This May we’ll also be celebrating the 10 year anniversary of our first record “Gemini” with a string of shows with our friends Beach Fossils. Both of us will be playing our first records in full!

Ask Jack Tatum what ‘Wild Nothing’ means and he’ll answer: ‘a contradiction’. In 2010, 21 year old Tatum released one of the finest cult pop records of the summer whilst ensconced in his senior year of college in Blacksburg, VA, a small mid-atlantic town better known for producing football fans and engineers than musicians. Tatum lives in contradictions.

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On Laughing Gas, the third EP from Wild Nothing, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Jack Tatum delves deeper into the territory where he thrives: namely, the synth and sophisti-pop of the 1980s. Working within a more mechanical and synthetic framework than his previous releases, Wild Nothing continues to delicately toe the line between the organic and the unnatural. These are still pop songs, but there’s an underlying sense of uneasiness that threads the music together.

Recorded in Los Angeles, CA and Richmond, VA with the help of Jorge Elbrecht, these five songs were originally imagined alongside last year’s Indigo and were written and tracked simultaneously with the album. When work on the full-length was nearing completion, Tatum set these ideas aside; they seemed to fit better on their own. In spare moments between tours, Tatum began to look back and piece the songs together at his home studio in Richmond, reconnecting with Elbrecht to mix the EP. With Elbrecht in Denver and Tatum in Richmond, the two went back and forth on the final touches, molding a common thread from the Lô Borges inspired new wave of “Sleight Of Hand” to the propulsive, icy synth funk of “Foyer”.

Often considered a secondary or transitional format, Wild Nothing has always used the EP to further explore new ideas and influences. Laughing Gas is no exception.

Releases January 31st, 2020

Ask Jack Tatum what ‘Wild Nothing’ means and he’ll answer: ‘a contradiction’. In 2010, 21 year old Tatum released one of the finest cult pop records of the summer whilst ensconced in his senior year of college in Blacksburg, VA, a small mid-atlantic town better known for producing football fans and engineers than musicians. Tatum lives in contradictions.

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A year following the release of Wild Nothing’s fourth studio album, Indigo, Wild Nothing share a look into their sweeping live set ahead of the band’s November 2019 tour dates. Recorded in November 2018, Live from Brooklyn Steel is in-depth survey of the band’s celebrated catalog, showcasing songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Jack Tatum’s versatility and strength in composition.
Released September 27th, 2019

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“A project that has virtually perfected the art of writing about romance” (Vulture), Jack Tatum’s Wild Nothing is gearing up for the release of its fourth album, Indigo. After a decade of making music as Wild Nothing  Indigo finds Tatum at his most efficient, calculated, and confident. Recorded at LA’s Sunset Sound and produced by Tatum and Jorge Elbrecht, it’s both a return to the fresh, transcendent sweep of his debut, 2010’s Gemini, and a culmination of heights reached, paths traveled, and lessons learned while creating the follow-ups, Nocturne and Life of Pause.

Leading into its August 31st release, Wild Nothing returns to the “intoxicating, pristine cut of melancholy pop”of lead single, “Letting Go,” via the official video. Directors Nathaniel Axel and David MacNutt comment, “Mourning, melodrama, psychedelic mushrooms, a bodybuilder, scarecrows, fetish rainwear, modernist architecture, catatonic schizophrenia, witchcraft, aquatherapy: Let It Go.

“Partners in Motion” is the second single from Wild Nothing’s forthcoming album, ‘Indigo

Wild Nothing Announces New Album <i>Indigo</i>, Shares Lead Single "Letting Go"

Jack Tatum has announced a new Wild Nothing album. Indigo is scheduled for release on August. 31st via Captured Tracks.

Tatum has also shared the album’s first single, “Letting Go.” The single features sweeping synths and light vocal distortion, staying true to the ‘80s origins of the dream-pop sound. Its chiming guitar and Tatum’s sweet falsetto in the chorus bring you to a pastel-painted room where there’s a slow-motion pillow fight going on. Listen to the track down below.

Indigo is Wild Nothing’s fourth album and the follow-up to 2016’s Life of Pause. The album, produced by Jorge Elbrecht, features Cam Allen on drums and Benji Lysaght on guitar. The album is a culmination of almost a decade’s worth of Tatum’s music as Wild Nothing. Indigo is in it’s “own cyborg world, utilizing the artful mechanisms of human touch with the precision of technology to create the classic, pristine sound Tatum has been seeking his entire career,” per a press release.

Tatum has also said that he thinks about how his music will age and that “ideas of ‘timeless’ are going to be different—so if Indigo is not timeless then it’s at least ‘out of time.’”

Wild Nothing has announced a fall North American tour to support Indigo.

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Wild Nothing, aka Brooklyn-based musician Jake Tatum, released his debut album ‘Gemini’ in 2010 to critical acclaim. Five years on, with an equally impressive sophomore release and a series of EPs under his belt, Tatum is pleased to announce his third-studio album and self-proclaimed most “mature and honest” work to date, ‘Life Of Pause’.

When Jack Tatum began work on ‘Life Of Pause’ he had fascinating ambitions. “I desperately wanted for this to be the kind of record that would displace me,” he says. “I’m terrified by the idea of being any one thing, or being of any one genre. And whether or not I accomplish that, I know that my only hope of getting there is to constantly reinvent. That reinvention doesn’t need to be drastic, but every new record has to have its own identity, and it has to have a separate set of goals from what came before.”

‘Life Of Pause’ is an exquisitely arranged and beautifully recorded collection of songs that marry the immediate with the indefinable. “I allowed myself to go down every route I could imagine even if it ended up not working for me,” he says. “I owe it to myself to take as many risks as possible. Songs are songs you have to allow yourself to be open to everything.”

After a prolonged period of writing and experimentation recording took place over several weeks in both Los Angeles and Stockholm, with producer Thom Monahan (Devendra Banhart, Beachwood Sparks) helping Tatum in his search for a more natural and organically textured sound. In Sweden, in a studio once owned by ABBA, they enlisted Peter, Bjorn & John drummer John Ericsson and fellow Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra veteran TK to contribute drums and marimba. In California, at Monahan’s home, Tatum collaborated with Medicine guitarist Brad Laner and a crew of saxophonists.

From the hypnotic polyrhythms of ‘Reichpop’ to the sugary howl of ‘Japanese Alice’ to the hallucinogenic R&B of ‘A Woman’s Wisdom’, the result is a complete, fully immersive listening environment. “I just kept things really simple, writing as ideas came to me,” he says. “There’s definitely a different kind of ‘self’ in the picture this time around. There’s no real love lost, it’s much more a record of coming to terms and defining what it is that you have – your place, your relationships. I view every record as an opportunity to write better songs. At the end of the day it still sounds like me, just new.”

Wild Nothing, aka Brooklyn-based musician Jake Tatum, released his debut album ‘Gemini’ in 2010 to critical acclaim. Five years on, with an equally impressive sophomore release and a series of EPs under his belt, Tatum says
Songs are songs you have to allow yourself to be open to everything.” .
I view every record as an opportunity to write better songs. At the end of the day it still sounds like me, just new.”

Wild Nothing performing live in the KEXP studio. Recorded April 25, 2016.

Songs:
TV Queen
A Woman’s Wisdom
Lady Blue
Adore

This is a great music video starring Michelle Williams, taken from the third album “Life Of Pause”

Jack Tatum on the cover of Wild Nothing’s Life of Pause, is seen sitting alone in a romantic sitting room setting, staring at apparently nothing. Is this meant to reflect the recording process Jack Tatum records and writes albums alone, for legions of well-read romantics yearning for a hit of nostalgic dream-pop to play in solitude.

With Life of Pause Tatum promised a less mechanical feel to this record than the previous Nocturne, but does he deliver? From the get-go, ‘Reichpop‘ feels far less melancholic than Wild Nothing’s previous work. The bass lines bounce along a sea of bubbly synths reminiscent of Bombay Bicycle Club’s ‘Luna’, but without the spark. ‘Lady Blue‘ is breezy, with a very moreish melodic chorus, but it isn’t long before the album drowns in its own genre. Dream-pop is the word, and Tatum has a more than obvious love for the 80s. Their basic DNA comes directly from a 1987 TV montage, name-checking of Japan as the mecca of futurism; ‘Japanese Alice‘ (Life of Pause’s standout moment) is a track that is very much for fans of the tragically seldom mentioned, Lloyd Cole and The Commotions. ‘TV Queen‘ and ‘To Know You’ (previous singles) threaten greatness, the latter bass-driven and a wash with synthetic alarm sounds (borrowed from Erasure’s ‘Chorus‘) stands out from the monochromatic album tracks but lacks a genuine chorus.

The echo-delayed guitars and dreamy vocals do tend to take their toll. After a while how much dream-pop can one listen to before realising you are in a never ending 80’s themed nightmare? LikeBeach House and The Pains of Being Pure at Heart, Wild Nothing create pleasant music electro-pop but are still waiting for that moment to make themselves a band that really matters. Music without risks can become stale. So what do you think Tatum? A collaboration with maybe Shaggy or Andrew WK? Or maybe it’s just all about being pleasant sitting alone in your room.

 

Wild Nothing’s Third Album coming out in 2016.