Posts Tagged ‘David Tattersall’

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The Surfing Magazines record has an immediate and unique energy – an old quality. It feels handmade. Analogue. Fun. In keeping with those themes – and because it’s nearly impossible to get every member of such a super-group in the same place at the same time – the plan was to do all the videos in one go. Just to keep it fresh – that location was a boat. That boat being The Grand Cru, a boat Pete Townsend made into a studio (apparently so him and Eric Clapton could make a record at sea). The results are three videos that revel in their unpolished existence. Long Live The Surfing Magazines.” – Piers Dennis, director.

The Surfing Magazines are a garage rock supergroup. The band contains one half of Slow Club and two thirds of The Wave Pictures. Dominic Brider, who has played with many local bands and is an extremely groovy dude, completes the line-up on drums. 

Band Members
Charles Watson, David Tattersall, Dominic Brider, Franic Rozycki
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The Wave Pictures are a band who are sometimes a victim of their own productivity. Even when trying to keep up with their album releases, the odd one is bound to slip through the gaps. If we’re honest, in our case that was true of the excellent Look Inside Your Heart, released last year on Moshi Moshi Records. Listening back to it recently, what fools we were, what silly foolish fools to not have taken this record to our hearts and embraced it with the tender loving it so richly deserves.

This week, ahead of a series of UK dates later this month, the band have shared a new video to the album’s understated highlight, the track “Shelly”. The track is a gentle shuffle of a track, frontman David Tattersall describes as, “a love song in the laid back style of late 70s Grateful Dead only with even better lyrics” – and we wouldn’t argue with that. It’s a track that is musically a lot more complex than a cursory listen would suggest; the complex fluttering drums, the propulsive hum of soothing bass, they even, quite rarely for The Wave Pictures, throw in some delightfully lush harmonies. The addition of backing-vocals from Holly Holden, adding an almost French-pop feel to the blissed-out outro. Don’t make the same mistake we did, don’t ever let a record by The Wave Pictures pass you by, they’re far too special for that.

Band Members
Dave Tattersall
Franic Rozycki,
Jonny Helm

Shelly is taken from The Wave Pictures’ new album ‘Look Inside Your Heart’ – the second album they released in 2018 on Moshi Moshi Records:

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I recorded Little Martha in one day with Simon Trought at the old Soup Studio, underneath the Duke of Uke ukulele shop on Hanbury Street, just off Brick Lane in East London. There are no overdubs on the album, which was recorded live with one microphone. Franic Rozycki stopped by to play mandolin on a couple of tracks, but otherwise it’s entirely me playing acoustic guitar. There are no vocals on the album.

I love guitar players. For every songwriter I like, there are a hundred guitarists who impress me. There are too many that I enjoy listening to to mention them all, but there are a few key influences on this particular record that are worth naming: American guitarists like Reverend Gary Davis, Leo Kottke, Blind Blake and Ry Cooder. John Fahey, who started recording in 1959, was one of the first guys to get me hooked on instrumental fingerpicking guitar. He plays with a simple thumb-and-two-fingers right hand technique, nice and slow. His music contains tremendous power and mystery, yet it is easy to grasp exactly what he is doing. He called himself an ”American Primitive”, which in technical terms I suppose is true, but his ideas are very strange and sophisticated, particularly in his synthesis of 20th century European classical music and (American) folk and blues. I cover a number of his tunes on the album, and I clumsily attempt to copy his style a little on the ones I wrote. More than anyone else, the album is a tribute to Fahey and to my love of his music, which I have listened to for 20 years now and still find fascinating. We even copied the simple black-on-white style of Fahey’s Blind Joe Death LP cover when we made the sleeve.

From the age of 9 until I was about 16, this was all I played: acoustic guitar instrumentals like the kind on this album. I abandoned this practise when I started writing songs and formed The Wave Pictures. It was really nice for me to go back to this way of playing that means so much to me, after 14 years playing rock music. I had a lot of fun learning the tunes, developing big blisters on my fingers again, practising for hours in the bathroom where the acoustics are better. And it was a pleasure, as always, to record with Simon. It’s nice to show a different side of yourself every so often. I am so happy I got to make this record and that WIAIWYA records kindly decided to release it.

David Tattersall, August 2012