Posts Tagged ‘Tame Impala’

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How does a psychedelic loner turned lover reckon with time’s relentless forward march? By plunging backward into an analog dance party where everything glows like a disco ball reflecting off puffy-haired monsters of rock. Kevin Parker built his legend crafting vivid alternate histories of classic rock and big-tent dance music. If 2015’s Currents blurred together the sounds of the modern festival scene, The Slow Rush sounds darker, more interior, more retro — a hallucinogenic swirl bridging the gap between Studio 54 and the Midwest arenas of the same era.

It’s not technically a music video, but a pre-assembled “live” taping for The Late Show With Stephen Colbert. Nonetheless, Kevin Parker of Tame Impala’s performance of “Is It True” is as visually striking as any of the outfit’s proper clips, with a split-screened Parker accompanying his vocals on both guitar and bass in three separate, color-coded columns. The ending result is somehow exponentially more captivating than your average remote livestream performance.

An Island Records Australia release © 2020 Modular Recordings Pty Ltd.

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Tame Impala graced us with three new songs and two remixes. for their Currents album
The unreleased B-Sides,Currents B-Sides & Remixes dropped with the Perth psych big-guns doubling up and gifting us an early release of the expanded collector’s edition of their 2015 album Currents. Here we have a collection of all the tracks .

The release features three unreleased tracks (including the instrumental ‘Powerlines’, (heard in this teaser) and two remixes (one by GUM aka Tame bandmate Jay Watson, and Soulwax’s funked-up take on ‘Let It Happen’). The track ‘List Of People (To try And Forget About)’ was originally written in the gap between 2012’s Lonerism and starting sessions for Currents, as Kevin Parker tells Beats 1 host Zane Lowe.
“I guess maybe one of the reasons it didn’t end up on [Currents] was that it was started on so early and I was so over it by the time I was finishing the album.”

It took Kevin Parker five years to perfect Tame Impala’s follow-up to the massively-successful Currents. Listening to this collection it’s easy to see where that time went — on his project’s fourth studio album, Parker played the part of perfectionist, with every synth note, guitar riff and drum beat intricately placed to be as sonically pristine as possible. This collection gives Currents fans plenty of the danceable prog-rock music they’ve come to love while also expanding outward into smooth, groovy new territory . Parker’s pure musicianship shines through with his latest offering, proving once again why the superstar likes of Travis Scott, Lady Gaga, Kanye West and more are clamouring to work with him.

This is a really good compilation and rarities of an artist are always something love to look for.

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Out In The World conveys a specific feeling for me, like thinking everyone’s having fun without you,” explains Gum’s Jay Watson of his latest single. The deep diving and soaring pop track from the POND and Tame Impala multi-instrumentalist is an ode to getting out there and living, no matter the associated anxieties (whatever that means to you this week).

“It was one of the easiest songs to write and record on the [upcoming] record. I’m not sure if that makes it good or not but we’ll see!”

We attest, it does. And the associated video, featuring Watson wandering the streets of L.A. in a very good trench coat makes us feel all kinds of sweet melancholy. Watson’s notes on mental health, living in the moment and playing keyboard underwater. And be the first to watch Out In The World.

Official video for new single Out In The World by GUM. Released 13 March 2020

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It’s been awhile, huh? After the Australian psych band led by Kevin Parker dominated the first half of the decade, particularly with its back-to-back classics Lonerism and its poppier sibling Currents, we haven’t heard much from Tame Impala since 2015. Sure, they’ve headlined virtually every major music festival and the biggest stages across the world over the past five years, new music has been few and far in between. This is the band that headlined Coachella and played SNL on the heels of releasing two singles and nothing else, after all. Now almost a year since the poppy groove of “Borderline” was dropped, we’re finally getting to hear The Slow Rush, a record that sounds like the logical progression from Currents’ embrace of psychedelic modern R&B and Parker’s work with Lady Gaga, Mark Ronson and Travis Scott. But don’t worry, you Innerspeaker and Lonerism purists: There’s lots of psych rock jams to love here underneath the shimmering synth, too.

The Slow Rush (out February 14, 2020

The Slow Rush was recorded between Los Angeles and Parker’s studio in his hometown of Fremantle, Australia. The twelve tracks were recorded, produced and mixed by Parker. The Slow Rush is Parker’s deep dive into the oceans of time, conjuring the feeling of a lifetime in a lightning bolt, of major milestones whizzing by while you’re looking at your phone, it’s a paean to creation and destruction and the unending cycle of life.

The album cover was created in collaboration with photographer Neil Krug and features a symbol of humanity all but swallowed whole by the surrounding environment, as though in the blink of an eye. “It’s been the year of pressure, 2019,” Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker told Lauren Laverne on 6 Music in November. Most of the pressure stemmed from himself, he admitted; a ticking clock to finish the band’s fourth album, which lands five years after 2015’s ‘Currents’.

As is tradition for Parker, he worked in isolation between studio’s Fremantle, Australia and Malibu, California. For the latter, his AirBnb was caught up in last year’s California wildfires. He fled the flat with his laptop, without realising the extent of the fires.

As for the album title, he says: “it means a lot of things. Above everything, I like the way it makes me feel. It’s an oxymoron, a paradox. It describes to me how I feel about time.”

Tame Impala is a rare bird in 2020: a relatively new (“new” meaning “roughly decade-old”) rock band that can fill stadiums. The band — which routinely headlines festivals and played SNL last March led by Australian singer and producer Kevin Parker, who’s collaborated with everyone from Travis Scott to Miguel to Lady Gaga to Kanye West. Tame Impala has morphed into something proggier and more experimental as it’s gotten more popular; there’s a searching quality to its songs that’s really connected with worldwide audiences.

Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker was the virtual musical guest last night (May 11th on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert in the US.
For his appearance, Parker performed ‘Is It True’, a track from Tame Impala’s album ‘The Slow Rush’, released earlier this year, in a split-screen setup where he played bass, guitar and sang in the three-way visual.

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“I have to feel kind of worthless again to want to make music,” Kevin Parker said of the long gestation time between the forthcoming Tame Impala album “The Slow Rush” and 2015’s world-beating “Currents”. While the dreamy introspection of Parker’s past music treats the passing of time as a man-made construct, recent Tame Impala output suggests he has been thinking a lot about the subject of late. Patience, the first of his three 2019 singles, extolled the virtues of waiting around, but It Might Be Time flips the script, seeing him obsess over friends growing up and moving on, realising he isn’t as young as he once was. “Nothing lasts forever,” he sighs as if just realising this truth, while a prominent synth swings from side to side like a pendulum – or is it ringing out like an emergency siren? Either way, there’s an urgency to this track that we’ve yet to hear from Tame Impala, and we’ve got all the time in the world for it.

Band Members
Kevin Parker – Guitar / Bass / Drums / Sing
Jay Watson – Keys
Dominic Simper – Guitar / synth
Cam Avery – Bass
Julien Barbagallo – Drums

An Island Records Australia release © 2019 Modular Recordings Pty Ltd. Tame Impala’s new album The Slow Rush will be out 14th February 2020.

Tame Impala almost single-handedly brought about a psych revolution as soon as their track ‘Elephant’ dominated the airwaves in 2012. It wasn’t long before just about every other guitar band started experimenting with effect pedals and tried to mimic the production genius that is the bandleader Kevin Parker.

Many people have put Tame Impala’s unique sound down to the fact that their hometown of Perth is the most isolated major city in the world. But the band grew out of the vibrant Perth scene that also produced other notable Australian bands like Pond and GUM.

“The Slow Rush” was recorded between Los Angeles and Parker’s studio in his hometown of Fremantle, Australia. The long-awaited 4th full-length album from Tame Impala

The twelve tracks were recorded, produced and mixed by Parker. “The Slow Rush” is Parker’s deep dive into the oceans of time, conjuring the feeling of a lifetime in a lightning bolt, of major milestones whizzing by while you’re looking at your phone, it’s a paean to creation and destruction and the unending cycle of life. Parker told the New York Times earlier this year, “a lot of the songs carry this idea of time passing, of seeing your life flash before your eyes, being able to see clearly your life from this point onwards. i’m being swept by this notion of time passing. there’s something really intoxicating about it.” the album cover was created in collaboration with photographer Neil Krug and features a symbol of humanity all but swallowed whole by the surrounding environment, as though in the blink of an eye. in the last six months Tame Impala have headlined multiple major festivals including Glastonbury, Coachella, Primavera, Lollapalooza, Acl and more. he debuted two new songs on Saturday Night Live and sold out arenas around the world including two nights at New York City’s Madison Square Garden.

“A lot of the songs carry this idea of time passing, of seeing your life flash before your eyes, being able to see clearly your life from this point onwards. I’m being swept by this notion of time passing. There’s something really intoxicating about it.” – Kevin Parker

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Fans have been patiently waiting and now they’ve been rewarded – Tame Impala have finally dropped a new track!

The track, dubbed Patienceis the first new music from Perth’s Kevin Parker (who works under the Tame Impala moniker) since the 2015 Grammy-nominated album, CurrentsIt’s described as a “mid-tempo chugger of ’70s disco and ’90s house, stoned on the house-made Tame Impala lysergic liquor”.

‘Patience’ is a mid tempo chugger of 70s disco and 90s house, stoned on the house-made Tame Impala lysergic liquor. A jubilant, confident cut of elegant piano jabs, driving disco drums and Parker’s inimitable vocal style, the track is a lyrical meditation on life’s cycles and phases that ascends to an overwhelmingly blissed out zenith, as our protagonist makes peace with the transience of time. It’s a potent hint at the infinite possibilities for future Tame Impala.

Tame Impala are headlining Coachella next month, and have recently been announced on both the Glastonbury and Lollapalooza line-ups.

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Pond have just announced that they’ll will release a new album, “Tasmania”, in a couple months. The project — which is led by former Tame Impala bassist Nick Allbrook put their most recent album, The Weather, back in 2017, and Tasmania is being presented as a “sister album” to that one. As with most of their albums, this one was produced by Allbrook’s former bandmate and Tame Impala head honcho Kevin Parker.

Last year, the band released two songs that will be featured on the album “Burnt Out Star” and “Sixteen Days”  and now they’re sharing another new one, “Daisy,” alongside an accompanying music video.

Allbrook had to say about the track in a fan newsletter: “Daisy” includes an interpolation of the Pilgrim Brothers ‘I Feel Like Going Back Home’. It’s about Summertime, the rigs are out, fires burn, bottl’os and dams drained aaaaand photos leaving us warped memories. Blood and lonely saltwater cowfolk.

‘Daisy’ is the new song from POND.

Tasmania is out 1st March via Spinning Top/Marathon Artists/Caroline/Interscope.

Another one of Perth’s heroes. £Giant Tortoise” is mega, there’s nothing like it really. Pond changed the game for me with Hobo Magic. Going back to Sabbath roots, heavy prog, ’70s metal origins to add their unique flavour of psych to the modern era.

A Perthadelic mind-splurge, that’s what. To simplify matters, let’s start with just two: Kevin Parker and Nick Allbrook, Tame Impala’s singer and ex-bassist respectively, and the two biggest heads in the burgeoning Perth psych scene. Whenever Parker was locked away to single-handedly pull Tame’s albums out of God’s nostril, Allbrook was busy with his own astral pop projections.

Jamming randomly with other at-loose-ends Tame members (and occasionally Kevin too, on drums), he built a sprawling collective around Pond, the improvisational art-rock collaboration that was formed on the day of their first house-party gig in 2008, and knocked up their 2009 debut album ‘Psychedelic Mango’ on an eight-track in Nick’s parents’ granny flat. After three more albums (see box, right), and with all the sounds in his head colliding with the fucked-Floyd freak-outs of ‘Lonerism’ on tour, Nick left Tame Impala in May to concentrate on Pond, among other projects. Bizarrely, he was replaced in Tame by Pond drummer Cam Avery, who clearly never got the ‘Leaving Tame Impala To Concentrate On Pond’ memo.

To quit the coolest band in the world to go make a seven-track album of surreal psychedelic blues about spiritualism, giant tortoises, conspiracy theorists and Pegasus. But that’s what Allbrook has done, and with considerable success. Pond’s fifth album, ‘Hobo Rocket’, bristles with unrestrained creativity and sonic exploration, while verging away from pastoral prog towards a harder garage blues slant. Spiritualist acid mania infects ‘Hobo Rocket’ from its first mystical inklings: opener ‘Whatever Happened To The Million Head Collide?’ wafts in on a cloud of MGMT and a distorted Buddy Holly bass riff, Nick emitting psychedelic yowls between references to “the holiest of holies’’ and how “I am, you are Buddha, Krishna, God’’. Then he screams, and the track becomes a White Stripes/Band Of Skulls voodoo rocker, Nick shifting from meditative peacenik to paranoid conspiracy freak: “I’m gonna sleep for a week and not speak at all/Cover myself in oil and tin foil’’. It’s a schizophrenic mash-up, but one hell of a sucker-punch opening.

Heavy as a narwhal’s balls and concerning the crippling emotional effects of psychoactive medication, the brittle blues bluster of ‘Xanman’ provides pop relief in the style of a wormhole ‘Seven Nation Army’, Nick playing the lusty funk squealer with commitment during the blow-out coda. ‘O Dharma’ – by turns The Beatles’ ‘Sun King’, Pink Floyd’s ‘Any Colour You Like’ and Hot Chip getting groovy round the Maharaja’s gaff – is perhaps the sweetest acoustic gospel-hippy swirl ever to centre around the phrase “And if you muthafuckers don’t like it you can all get out’’. It’s a key phrase to Pond’s ethos; reflecting their experimental roots – and perhaps Nick’s wild musical mood swings – this is an album of dichotomies, both thematic and sonic. Lulled into a pleasant dopamine haze by ‘O Dharma’? Now take the ponderous, misanthropic Zep-metal chunder of ‘Aloneaflamaflower’, segueing into ‘Giant Tortoise’ – a tune that imagines Jack White going back in time to guest on ‘Across The Universe’.

Pond’s open-mindedness lifts off towards event status on the title track, in which a guy called Cowboy John – a local legend described in the sleevenotes as “artist, mystic, wanderer, eccentric’’ – rants and mumbles about flying through the universe at “twice the speed of light’’ on a “horse with wings’’ like a dope-fried Lou Reed, then starts asking the band mid-song what drugs they’ve got. It all wraps up with the demonic blues metal of ‘Midnight Mass (At The Market St Payphone)’, complete with a pastoral, Floyd-y, four-minute ‘Dear Prudence’ outro to a record that leaves you mentally a-quiver. When a million heads collide, it seems, it’s a colourstorm.

Giant track, tortoise friendly.

Release date: 05th Aug, 2013