Posts Tagged ‘Kevin Parker’

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How does a psychedelic loner turned lover reckon with time’s relentless forward march? By plunging backward into an analog dance party where everything glows like a disco ball reflecting off puffy-haired monsters of rock. Kevin Parker built his legend crafting vivid alternate histories of classic rock and big-tent dance music. If 2015’s Currents blurred together the sounds of the modern festival scene, The Slow Rush sounds darker, more interior, more retro — a hallucinogenic swirl bridging the gap between Studio 54 and the Midwest arenas of the same era.

It’s not technically a music video, but a pre-assembled “live” taping for The Late Show With Stephen Colbert. Nonetheless, Kevin Parker of Tame Impala’s performance of “Is It True” is as visually striking as any of the outfit’s proper clips, with a split-screened Parker accompanying his vocals on both guitar and bass in three separate, color-coded columns. The ending result is somehow exponentially more captivating than your average remote livestream performance.

An Island Records Australia release © 2020 Modular Recordings Pty Ltd.

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It’s been awhile, huh? After the Australian psych band led by Kevin Parker dominated the first half of the decade, particularly with its back-to-back classics Lonerism and its poppier sibling Currents, we haven’t heard much from Tame Impala since 2015. Sure, they’ve headlined virtually every major music festival and the biggest stages across the world over the past five years, new music has been few and far in between. This is the band that headlined Coachella and played SNL on the heels of releasing two singles and nothing else, after all. Now almost a year since the poppy groove of “Borderline” was dropped, we’re finally getting to hear The Slow Rush, a record that sounds like the logical progression from Currents’ embrace of psychedelic modern R&B and Parker’s work with Lady Gaga, Mark Ronson and Travis Scott. But don’t worry, you Innerspeaker and Lonerism purists: There’s lots of psych rock jams to love here underneath the shimmering synth, too.

The Slow Rush (out February 14, 2020

The Slow Rush was recorded between Los Angeles and Parker’s studio in his hometown of Fremantle, Australia. The twelve tracks were recorded, produced and mixed by Parker. The Slow Rush is Parker’s deep dive into the oceans of time, conjuring the feeling of a lifetime in a lightning bolt, of major milestones whizzing by while you’re looking at your phone, it’s a paean to creation and destruction and the unending cycle of life.

The album cover was created in collaboration with photographer Neil Krug and features a symbol of humanity all but swallowed whole by the surrounding environment, as though in the blink of an eye. “It’s been the year of pressure, 2019,” Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker told Lauren Laverne on 6 Music in November. Most of the pressure stemmed from himself, he admitted; a ticking clock to finish the band’s fourth album, which lands five years after 2015’s ‘Currents’.

As is tradition for Parker, he worked in isolation between studio’s Fremantle, Australia and Malibu, California. For the latter, his AirBnb was caught up in last year’s California wildfires. He fled the flat with his laptop, without realising the extent of the fires.

As for the album title, he says: “it means a lot of things. Above everything, I like the way it makes me feel. It’s an oxymoron, a paradox. It describes to me how I feel about time.”

Tame Impala is a rare bird in 2020: a relatively new (“new” meaning “roughly decade-old”) rock band that can fill stadiums. The band — which routinely headlines festivals and played SNL last March led by Australian singer and producer Kevin Parker, who’s collaborated with everyone from Travis Scott to Miguel to Lady Gaga to Kanye West. Tame Impala has morphed into something proggier and more experimental as it’s gotten more popular; there’s a searching quality to its songs that’s really connected with worldwide audiences.

Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker was the virtual musical guest last night (May 11th on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert in the US.
For his appearance, Parker performed ‘Is It True’, a track from Tame Impala’s album ‘The Slow Rush’, released earlier this year, in a split-screen setup where he played bass, guitar and sang in the three-way visual.

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“I have to feel kind of worthless again to want to make music,” Kevin Parker said of the long gestation time between the forthcoming Tame Impala album “The Slow Rush” and 2015’s world-beating “Currents”. While the dreamy introspection of Parker’s past music treats the passing of time as a man-made construct, recent Tame Impala output suggests he has been thinking a lot about the subject of late. Patience, the first of his three 2019 singles, extolled the virtues of waiting around, but It Might Be Time flips the script, seeing him obsess over friends growing up and moving on, realising he isn’t as young as he once was. “Nothing lasts forever,” he sighs as if just realising this truth, while a prominent synth swings from side to side like a pendulum – or is it ringing out like an emergency siren? Either way, there’s an urgency to this track that we’ve yet to hear from Tame Impala, and we’ve got all the time in the world for it.

Band Members
Kevin Parker – Guitar / Bass / Drums / Sing
Jay Watson – Keys
Dominic Simper – Guitar / synth
Cam Avery – Bass
Julien Barbagallo – Drums

An Island Records Australia release © 2019 Modular Recordings Pty Ltd. Tame Impala’s new album The Slow Rush will be out 14th February 2020.

Tame Impala almost single-handedly brought about a psych revolution as soon as their track ‘Elephant’ dominated the airwaves in 2012. It wasn’t long before just about every other guitar band started experimenting with effect pedals and tried to mimic the production genius that is the bandleader Kevin Parker.

Many people have put Tame Impala’s unique sound down to the fact that their hometown of Perth is the most isolated major city in the world. But the band grew out of the vibrant Perth scene that also produced other notable Australian bands like Pond and GUM.

“The Slow Rush” was recorded between Los Angeles and Parker’s studio in his hometown of Fremantle, Australia. The long-awaited 4th full-length album from Tame Impala

The twelve tracks were recorded, produced and mixed by Parker. “The Slow Rush” is Parker’s deep dive into the oceans of time, conjuring the feeling of a lifetime in a lightning bolt, of major milestones whizzing by while you’re looking at your phone, it’s a paean to creation and destruction and the unending cycle of life. Parker told the New York Times earlier this year, “a lot of the songs carry this idea of time passing, of seeing your life flash before your eyes, being able to see clearly your life from this point onwards. i’m being swept by this notion of time passing. there’s something really intoxicating about it.” the album cover was created in collaboration with photographer Neil Krug and features a symbol of humanity all but swallowed whole by the surrounding environment, as though in the blink of an eye. in the last six months Tame Impala have headlined multiple major festivals including Glastonbury, Coachella, Primavera, Lollapalooza, Acl and more. he debuted two new songs on Saturday Night Live and sold out arenas around the world including two nights at New York City’s Madison Square Garden.

“A lot of the songs carry this idea of time passing, of seeing your life flash before your eyes, being able to see clearly your life from this point onwards. I’m being swept by this notion of time passing. There’s something really intoxicating about it.” – Kevin Parker

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Fans have been patiently waiting and now they’ve been rewarded – Tame Impala have finally dropped a new track!

The track, dubbed Patienceis the first new music from Perth’s Kevin Parker (who works under the Tame Impala moniker) since the 2015 Grammy-nominated album, CurrentsIt’s described as a “mid-tempo chugger of ’70s disco and ’90s house, stoned on the house-made Tame Impala lysergic liquor”.

‘Patience’ is a mid tempo chugger of 70s disco and 90s house, stoned on the house-made Tame Impala lysergic liquor. A jubilant, confident cut of elegant piano jabs, driving disco drums and Parker’s inimitable vocal style, the track is a lyrical meditation on life’s cycles and phases that ascends to an overwhelmingly blissed out zenith, as our protagonist makes peace with the transience of time. It’s a potent hint at the infinite possibilities for future Tame Impala.

Tame Impala are headlining Coachella next month, and have recently been announced on both the Glastonbury and Lollapalooza line-ups.

Another one of Perth’s heroes. £Giant Tortoise” is mega, there’s nothing like it really. Pond changed the game for me with Hobo Magic. Going back to Sabbath roots, heavy prog, ’70s metal origins to add their unique flavour of psych to the modern era.

A Perthadelic mind-splurge, that’s what. To simplify matters, let’s start with just two: Kevin Parker and Nick Allbrook, Tame Impala’s singer and ex-bassist respectively, and the two biggest heads in the burgeoning Perth psych scene. Whenever Parker was locked away to single-handedly pull Tame’s albums out of God’s nostril, Allbrook was busy with his own astral pop projections.

Jamming randomly with other at-loose-ends Tame members (and occasionally Kevin too, on drums), he built a sprawling collective around Pond, the improvisational art-rock collaboration that was formed on the day of their first house-party gig in 2008, and knocked up their 2009 debut album ‘Psychedelic Mango’ on an eight-track in Nick’s parents’ granny flat. After three more albums (see box, right), and with all the sounds in his head colliding with the fucked-Floyd freak-outs of ‘Lonerism’ on tour, Nick left Tame Impala in May to concentrate on Pond, among other projects. Bizarrely, he was replaced in Tame by Pond drummer Cam Avery, who clearly never got the ‘Leaving Tame Impala To Concentrate On Pond’ memo.

To quit the coolest band in the world to go make a seven-track album of surreal psychedelic blues about spiritualism, giant tortoises, conspiracy theorists and Pegasus. But that’s what Allbrook has done, and with considerable success. Pond’s fifth album, ‘Hobo Rocket’, bristles with unrestrained creativity and sonic exploration, while verging away from pastoral prog towards a harder garage blues slant. Spiritualist acid mania infects ‘Hobo Rocket’ from its first mystical inklings: opener ‘Whatever Happened To The Million Head Collide?’ wafts in on a cloud of MGMT and a distorted Buddy Holly bass riff, Nick emitting psychedelic yowls between references to “the holiest of holies’’ and how “I am, you are Buddha, Krishna, God’’. Then he screams, and the track becomes a White Stripes/Band Of Skulls voodoo rocker, Nick shifting from meditative peacenik to paranoid conspiracy freak: “I’m gonna sleep for a week and not speak at all/Cover myself in oil and tin foil’’. It’s a schizophrenic mash-up, but one hell of a sucker-punch opening.

Heavy as a narwhal’s balls and concerning the crippling emotional effects of psychoactive medication, the brittle blues bluster of ‘Xanman’ provides pop relief in the style of a wormhole ‘Seven Nation Army’, Nick playing the lusty funk squealer with commitment during the blow-out coda. ‘O Dharma’ – by turns The Beatles’ ‘Sun King’, Pink Floyd’s ‘Any Colour You Like’ and Hot Chip getting groovy round the Maharaja’s gaff – is perhaps the sweetest acoustic gospel-hippy swirl ever to centre around the phrase “And if you muthafuckers don’t like it you can all get out’’. It’s a key phrase to Pond’s ethos; reflecting their experimental roots – and perhaps Nick’s wild musical mood swings – this is an album of dichotomies, both thematic and sonic. Lulled into a pleasant dopamine haze by ‘O Dharma’? Now take the ponderous, misanthropic Zep-metal chunder of ‘Aloneaflamaflower’, segueing into ‘Giant Tortoise’ – a tune that imagines Jack White going back in time to guest on ‘Across The Universe’.

Pond’s open-mindedness lifts off towards event status on the title track, in which a guy called Cowboy John – a local legend described in the sleevenotes as “artist, mystic, wanderer, eccentric’’ – rants and mumbles about flying through the universe at “twice the speed of light’’ on a “horse with wings’’ like a dope-fried Lou Reed, then starts asking the band mid-song what drugs they’ve got. It all wraps up with the demonic blues metal of ‘Midnight Mass (At The Market St Payphone)’, complete with a pastoral, Floyd-y, four-minute ‘Dear Prudence’ outro to a record that leaves you mentally a-quiver. When a million heads collide, it seems, it’s a colourstorm.

Giant track, tortoise friendly.

Release date: 05th Aug, 2013

Kevin Parker’s Tame Impala has joined American house artist Zhu on his latest single. Parker continues to show his versatility and his penchant for pop music. Earlier he collaborated with retro party-starter Mark Ronson and R&B new-wavers SZA and DRAM. Neu-psych festival darlings Tame Impala team up with Chinese American house producer ZHU on a one-off collaboration.

This sounds like 4PM on a 90° summer afternoon. You and the crew have spent the day stumbling from stage to stage at your music festival of choice. You’re slightly intoxicated, but not so much that you’ve lost track of where you are. The opening synth sounds of “My Life” waft through nearby speakers — soft appredigios that lead into Kevin Parker’s hazy falsetto, which are soon underlined by rolling bass drums. The edible you just kicked in. Everything is perfect. You’ll live forever.

Currents Collectors Edition

The Tame Impala ,”Currents Collectors Edition” box set includes the album on limited edition red marbled vinyl with alternate artwork, a 12” featuring two remixes, and a 7” and flexidisc with three b-sides. Plus a poster and a zine of images and scribbles offering a candid glimpse into the making of “Currents”.

Now, just over two years since it was released, Tame Impala’s modern classic is getting the deluxe treatment, with a collector’s edition of the record set to be released next month.

Tame Impala first hinted at the emergence of this release way back in July of last year, but now we’re seeing something a lot more concrete. Announcing the news via social media and YouTube earlier , Tame Impala shared a video of Kevin Parker in the studio back in 2014, crafting one of the unheard songs that is set to appear on the new version of the record. With a release date set for November 17th, the Currents collector’s edition is set to include a gigantic array of fan-pleasing goodies, including the entire album on red marbled vinyl, with alternate artwork. Also included is a 12″ record with two remixes, a 7″ and a flexidisc record containing three B-sides, including a poster and zine, which contains a whole bunch of handwritten notes made by Kevin Parker during the recording session for the album.

 

While we wait for the collector’s edition of Currents to drop next month, check out Soulwax’s remix of ‘Let It Happen’, which we’re hoping will be included in the new edition.

If you’re keen on grabbing yourself a copy of the new edition of the record, head over to Tame Impala’s online store to pre-order yours. While there’s been no official announcement about it yet, some folks over on the Tame Impala subreddit on Reddit have discovered that the box set seems to be limited to 2,500 copies, so you might want to get in quick.

Of course, this isn’t the first time that Tame Impala have released an expanded version of their records. Back in 2011, they released a new edition of their debut record “Innerspeaker”, which featured an extra disc titled Extraspeaker that included a bunch of rarities and remixes.

 

Kevin Parker, the main creative force behind Tame Impala, has co-produced a song called “Sweep Me Off My Feet” for his bandmates’ side-project Pond. The single is taken from Pond’s upcoming album, which is set to arrive in “early 2017.” Grabbing Parker to produce is a pretty big coup these days, especially as the Tame Impala man’s been pretty busy with his other projects.

Pond have shared a new song titled “Sweep Me Off My Feet.” is a floaty psych-rock odyssey that really bears the Kevin Parker stamp Produced by the band alongside Tame Impala’s frontman (and sometime bandmate) Kevin Parker, the track marks their first piece of new music since January 2015. Listen to it below  “Sweep Me Off My Feet” is taken from Pond’s forthcoming new album, which arrives in “early 2017.” The band have also announced new U.S. tour dates; find those below as well. Pond’s last album is “Man It Feels Like Space Again”. both Allbrook and Jay Watson have kept themselves busy by venturing into their own solo projects.