Posts Tagged ‘Sugar’

Blue Hearts

Aggressive, loud and unrelenting – Bob Mould takes aim at the malaise of 2020 in the way only he can, showing the many Husker Du and Sugar aping bands just how it’s done.

Through some of the most direct, confrontational lyrics of his four-decade career, Mould makes his POV clear: “I never thought I’d see this bullshit again / To come of age in the ’80s was bad enough / We were marginalized and demonized / I watched a lot of my generation die / Welcome back to American crisis.”

Why “welcome back”? Because Mould experienced deja vu writing Blue Hearts in the fall of 2019. “Where it started to go in my head is back to a spot that I’ve been in before,” he says. “And that was the fall of 1983.” “where it started to go in my head is back to a spot that i’ve been in before,” he says. “and that was the fall of 1983.” back then, Mould was a self-described “22-year-old closeted gay man” touring with the legendary Hüsker Dü and seeing an epidemic consume his community. leaders, including the one in the white house, were content to let aids kill a generation. it’s been a long time since a power pop album has felt this present and pertinent, and who else but mould could bring that sound back to the forefront? “this is the catchiest batch of protest songs I’ve ever written in one sitting,” he says.

In the winter of 2019, Bob Mould bucked the era’s despair with his most melodic, upbeat album in ages, “Sunshine Rock”.

Cut to spring of 2020, and he has this to say: “We’re really in deep shit now.”

That sentiment informs the new full-length album, Blue Hearts (Merge Records, September 25th), the raging-but-catchy yin to Sunshine Rock’s yang.

To be sure, we were in some shit back in 2018, when Mould recorded Sunshine Rock with longtime colleagues Jon Wurster (drums), Jason Narducy (bass), and Beau Sorenson (engineer). Back then, he had a song called “American Crisis” that didn’t fit the album.

“That song is the seed for what we’re talking about now,” Mould says from his home in San Francisco during the COVID-19 lockdown. “At the time, it just seemed too heavy. Today it seems fucking quaint.”

“American Crisis” is the third song in a walloping first half of an album that spits plainspoken fire at the people who fomented this crisis. “This is the catchiest batch of protest songs I’ve ever written in one sitting,” he says.

Through some of the most direct, confrontational lyrics of his four-decade career, Mould makes his POV clear: “I never thought I’d see this bullshit again / To come of age in the ’80s was bad enough / We were marginalized and demonized / I watched a lot of my generation die / Welcome back to American crisis.”

“We have a charismatic, telegenic, say-anything leader being propped up by evangelicals,” he says. “These fuckers tried to kill me once. They didn’t do it. They scared me. I didn’t do enough. Guess what? I’m back, and we’re back here again. And I’m not going to sit quietly this time and worry about alienating anyone.”

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Recorded at the famed Electrical Audio in Chicago with Sorenson engineering and Mould producing, Blue Hearts nods to Mould’s past while remaining firmly planted in the issues of the day. Acoustic opener “Heart on My Sleeve” catalogues the ravages of climate change. “Next Generation” worries for who comes next. “American Crisis” references “Evangelical ISIS” and features this dagger of a line: “Pro-life, pro-life until you make it in someone else’s wife.”

“There are songs that have no room,” Mould says, laughing. “The other songs, there’s room. There is room for imagination on the second half of the record.”

That’s where the songs turn personal in a different way. Tracks like “When You Left,” “Siberian Butterfly,” and “Everyth!ng to You” are grounded in personal relationships. “Racing to the End” captures the economic disparity of Mould’s neighborhood, and “Leather Dreams”… well, maybe Jon Wurster put it best.

“Jon turns to Jason and asks, ‘Is this the dirtiest song you’ve ever played on?’” Mould recalls with a chuckle. “I clearly did not put the edit tool to that one. Those are all pretty true bits. What kind of person could possibly have a life like that?” He laughs again. “Says the author.”

“Leather Dreams,” “Password to My Soul,” and “The Ocean” were composed during a writing binge before a January 2020 Solo Electric tour, when Mould stayed up for three straight days. “Songs just kept coming out,” he says. “‘Leather Dreams’ and ‘The Ocean’ both appeared within hours. I barely remember writing them.”

That feels right for an explosive, hook-laden album like Blue Hearts. Only there’s nothing forgettable about it.

All songs written by Bob Mould

Bob Mould: Guitars, Vocals, Keyboards, Percussion
Jason Narducy: Bass, Backing Vocals
Jon Wurster: Drums, Percussion

Prague TV Orchestra: Strings on “American Crisis”

Released September 25th, 2020

Produced by Bob Mould
Engineered by Beau Sorenson

Copper Blue [Clean]

Bob Mould took a different path after the dissolution of post-punk legends Hüsker Dü, memorably releasing an acoustic-based solo debut in 1989’s Workbook followed by a return to volume with Black Sheets of Rain a year later. Then Nirvana arrived. He said he knew, right then, that guitar records were back. Copper Blue” is the debut studio album by American alternative rock band Sugar. It was voted 1992 Album of the Year

All of the songs were written by guitarist/vocalist Bob Mould, who also co-produced with Lou Giordano. The song “The Slim” is about losing someone to AIDS. Musically, the band continues the thick punk guitar of Mould’s previous band, Hüsker Dü, while slowing the tempo and emphasizing melody even more.

Bob Mould quickly formed Sugar with bassist David Barbe and drummer Malcolm Travis, releasing Copper Blue on September. 4th, 1992.  Several tracks were recorded for this album, but were not included. Mould decided to release them separately as an EP entitled “Beaster”.

“Music is such a circular thing. When Nevermind came out, that album changed the way people listen to music,” Mould told NPR in 2014. “A lot of the songs that I had been writing in 1991 led up to my next group, Sugar — and had it not been for Nevermind, I don’t know if Sugar’s Copper Blue would have stood a chance in ’92. But people were now receptive to this sound.”

Constructed in the same power trio image as Hüsker Dü, Sugar instead leaned more toward power pop – extending Mould’s underground legend into a new arena and into a new generation. What it wasn’t, Mould insisted at the time, was “alternative.”

This sunburst of hooky joy, however, followed a very dark period. Mould was coming off a failed personal relationship, and a failed professional one. A recent separation from his manager revealed that he’d signed away Mould’s publishing rights without permission. A split with Virgin Records followed, leaving Mould to toil through a rigorous – but financially necessary – nine-month solo tour in 1991.

As he averaged some 300 miles of driving a day, Mould had plenty of time to jump start his creative impulses. Something he once called a “lonely and inspiring” experience led to “plenty of time for reflection,” and then to these new songs.

Then came an appearance at an outdoor festival in Germany before some 7,000 people – all of whom, it seemed, where there to see Nirvana. On the verge of releasing their breakthrough Nevermind, Mould admitted that Nirvana “customarily trashed the joint.” Mould had the bad luck to follow them onstage.

“Pounding away on a 12-string acoustic by myself at an outdoor festival in the middle of the afternoon was no easy feat,” Mould said in 2011. “Nirvana destroys the stage, then it’s me carrying on like Richie Havens at Woodstock.”

Change was in the air, and Mould was deeply aware of it. You could, of course, draw a straight line from Hüsker Dü to Nirvana. The time for a return to the outsized energy, the riffy focus and even the format of Mould’s critically acclaimed but always commercially overlooked first band seemed to have finally arrived.

“The success of Nevermind re-tempered the ears of the listeners throughout the world,” Mould told NPR. “It was a heavy, punky record, but there was something about it that was so accessible that it opened up all these pathways for other musicians — myself included — to have our music heard.”

Sugar’s songs, once envisioned as solo performances, took on new life with the arrival of Barbe and Travis, and they immediately started feeling like a real band, Mould said. Sugar selected their name in the most off-the-cuff manner possible, while sitting inside a Waffle House at Athens, Ga. where they band spent some time working out their emerging sound in R.E.M.‘s practice space. “We got a big pot of coffee and banged out about 24 songs,” Travis said in 1992.

Mould was right; their timing was perfect. “Helpless” hit No. 5 on the modern rock charts; “A Good Idea” – which Mould has said was “an unconscious homage” to the Pixies’ “Debaser” – became a fan favorite, too. Free of so many lingering worries, tracks like “Hoover Dam” (a triumph of jangly optimism) simply came tumbling out.

“It was this dream song that just turned up as I was waking up one morning,” Mould said of “Hoover Dam” in a 2014 interview with Team Rock. “It came to me fully formed, and then it’s just all the baubles that make it that crazy baroque band thing. All that was pretty much in my head too, but you have to sit down and make these baubles shine. That’s the production stuff.”

Copper Blue did even better in the punk-loving U.K., reaching the Top 10. NME named it Album of the Year, even as “If I Can’t Change Your Mind” reached the Top 30 there. “What a fun ride that was. That was like 0 to 100 in about eight seconds,” Mould told Moehlis, adding that he was grateful that “I had 13 years of experience under my belt before the rocket got strapped to my ass.”

After all, pressure like that often leads rock stars down rocky paths, since “everybody wants everything all the time.” Instead, Mould got to enjoy the ride. “At this point in my life,” he said in his autobiography See a Little Light, “I was euphoric.”

Of course, plenty of people began to frame Sugar as a call back to his time with Hüsker Dü. There were, on the surface at least, some obvious similarities. For Mould, however, this represented a brand new start, and a most welcome one, even if he was returning to a tried-and-true trio set up.

“It’s a pretty comfortable spot for me,” Mould said in a 2014 interview. “It’s odd to say ‘comfortable,’ because it’s really a lot of work for me but musically it’s the best way, when I have two other people that I need to connect with. There’s a real clarity and a purpose to it because everybody knows how much they have to lift at all times. I like that interaction. It feels like jazz.

Their sets, like Bob Mould himself, focused on the here and now. “Hüsker Dü broke up,” he told the Los Angeles Times. “We had eight good years, and one bad one. Sugar doesn’t do any oldies.”

In July 24, 2012, the album was reissued by Merge Records as a 3-disc set containing the full album accompanied by B-sides (disc 1), the Beaster EP (disc 2), and a 1992 live performance at the Cabaret Metro (disc 3)
Band members

  • Bob Mould – guitars, vocals, keyboards, percussion
  • David Barbe – bass
  • Malcolm Travis – drums, percussion

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“Copper Blue” is the debut studio album by American alternative rock band Sugar. It was voted 1992 Album of the Year by the NME. All of the songs were written by guitarist/vocalist Bob Mould, who also co-produced with Lou Giordano .  The song “The Slim” is about losing someone to AIDS. Musically, the band continues the thick punk guitar of Mould’s previous band, Husker Du, while slowing the tempo and emphasizing melody even more.

A limited edition initial run of the CD was released by Rykodisc in a front-and-back metal copper sleeve with each of the 2,500 copies containing a one-of-a-kind polaroid photo taken by one of the three band members and stamped on the back with “Sugar Copper Blue Summer ’92.”

Sugar – Copper Blue (25th Anniversary Edition).

This exclusive release brings together the band’s seminal debut album alongside their raucous live performance at the Cabaret Metro in Chicago on 22nd July 1992.

To mark the 25th anniversary of Copper Blue the recordings are spread across 3 x heavyweight coloured LPs in Silver, Gold & Blue complimenting the original album artwork and is limited to just 1500 (territory restrictions apply). Contains the singles “A Good Idea”, “Changes” and “If You Can’t Change Your Mind”. 

Track Listing:

LP 1 – COPPER BLUE
1: The Act We Act 2: A Good Idea 3: Changes 4: Helpless 5: Hoover Dam 6: The Slim 7: If I Can’t Change Your Mind8: Fortune Teller 9: Slick 10: Man On The Moon

LP 2 & 3 – LIVE FROM THE CABARET METRO, CHICAGO, 22ND JULY 1992
1: The Act We Act 2: A Good Idea 3: Changes 4: Running Out of Time 5: Helpless 6: If I Can’t Change Your Mind 7: Where Diamonds Are Halos 8: Hoover Dam 9: Beer Commercial 10: Slick 11: Anyone 12: Clownmaster 13: Tilted 14: Armenia City in the Sky 15: JC Auto 16: The Slim 17: Dum Dum Boys 18: Man on the Moon

Several tracks were recorded for this album, but were not included. Mould decided to release them separately as an EP entitled Beaster.

The Band

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