Posts Tagged ‘Bob Mould’

Bob Mould has always worked best in power trio mode. After his iconic Minneapolis punk band Hüsker Dü fizzled out 1988, he spent a few years as a solo artist, releasing the well-regarded, acoustic oriented “Workbook” in 1989 and the louder but less successful “Black Sheets of Rain” in 1990.

Released from his contract with Virgin Records and inspired by Nirvana’s “Nevermind”, Mould found himself wanting to make noisy guitar pop again. He recorded demos which led to him signing to independent labels Creation Records in the UK and Rykodisc in North America. Recruiting bassist David Barbe and drummer Malcolm Travis to help record the album, he ended up forming a new band and while at at diner in Athens, GA, looking at the table’s container of sugar packets, they came up with their name.

With their roaring, punk-injected guitar pop sound, Sugar were definitely a more natural fit with a label of noisemakers like Creation (home to My Bloody Valentine and Ride) than Rykodisc (who were mainly known for being the first CD-only label).

“How ironic that after years fronting the hugely influential but desperately overlooked Hüsker Dü, Bob Mould’s first project with new band Sugar, 1992’s “Copper Blue”, would become the most commercially successful project of his career… it was released just as the seeds sown by his former band were bearing bountiful fruits in the post-Nirvana alternative nation, which provided ample explanation for its phenomenal success. But Sugar were well deserving of their success, regardless of time and place.

In any case, Sugar’s classic debut album, released September 4th 1992, is one of that year’s best, with Mould’s signature mix of rippers (“Changes,” “A Good Idea”), pop songs (“Helpless,” “If I Can’t Change Your Mind”) and even a little prog (“Hoover Dam”). “Copper Blue” was actually more of a hit in the U.K than across the pond, reaching No10 in the UK album charts and getting named the Best Album of 1992 by NME; the record really caught on with American alt-rock radio and MTV in 1993.

Sugar burned bright and hot, releasing “Beaster” (recorded during the same sessions as “Copper Blue“) a mere six months later, yet flamed out during sessions for their second album. Still, “Copper Blue” remains one of Mould’s best collection of songs. It’s a perfect record.

You can get “Copper Blue” and “Beaster” together as one deluxe double-LP set

Sugar – “Copper Blue” is the debut studio album by Sugar, released on this day (September 4th) in 1992.

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Husker Du helped invent alternative rock as we know it with their landmark 1984 double album “Zen Arcade” and its follow up albums (1985’s “Flip Your Wig” in particular predicted what the alt-rock mainstream wound sound like a decade later), and their impact was felt on pop punk too. It’s hard to pick just one Husker Du album for any best of list, but their 1986 major label debut “Candy Apple Grey” wins because of “Don’t Want to Know If You Are Lonely,” which would’ve been a pop punk smash if it came out in 1994.

It sounds as much as like proto-Green Day as the Buzzcocks did, and Green Day didn’t try to hide their love of the song — they released a faithful cover of it. Others on this album like “I Don’t Know For Sure” and “Eiffel Tower High” found Husker Du offering up punchy punk rock and sugary pop in equal measure, and it’s easy to hear how this former hardcore band was shaping pop punk with those songs too. Husker Du broke up before they were able to enjoy the same success that Green Day, Nirvana, and their other followers enjoyed, and even though co-frontman Bob Mould’s next band Sugar went on to release an alt-rock masterpiece with their 1992 debut Copper Blue, both Husker Du and Sugar remained underdogs compared to the bands they inspired.

Five years on from Candy Apple Grey, the roster of every major label would be heaving with angry young rock & roll powered by surging electric guitars, howling vocals and non-specific angst. This, of course, was a result of the success of Nirvana’s Nevermind. However, as Nirvana themselves never shied from admitting, Nirvana’s Nevermind was, in a major way, a result of Hüsker Dü, and specifically Hüsker Dü’s Candy Apple Grey. It is probably the first major label grunge album; the Minneapolis trio had already racked up around half a dozen albums of superior and weirdly tuneful punk rock before Warners signed them. “Candy Apple Grey” wasn’t markedly different from any of its indie predecessors in terms of style–basically Bob Mould’s buzzsaw guitar and jet-engine vocal competing to be heard over a rhythm section playing with the speed and abandon of a runaway locomotive–but the songs had never been this good before.

In drummer Grant Hart’s “Don’t Want To Know If You’re Lonely” and Mould’s “Eiffel Tower High”, Hüsker Dü came up with a giddying hybrid of Black Sabbath and The Byrds. Elsewhere, Mould’s acoustic “Hardly Getting Over It” amounted to the beginning of his absurdly overlooked solo career. Candy Apple Grey was the sort of dazzling, unnerving record that made people want to form bands of their own. The fact that so many of these bands were formed in and around Seattle is a phenomenon as yet unexplained by science.

Maybe it was for the best; extreme mainstream exposure took its toll on a lot of major pop punk and alt-rock bands, but Bob Mould is still churning out great record after great record today, nearly 40 years after the first Husker Du single.

Hüsker Dü

If there’s one word that describes Hüsker Dü it’s speed, whether that’s found in the ferocity of their earliest songs, the amphetamines charging through their veins, or the fact that their whole body of work including seven albums from the live freakout Land Speed Record through to their swansong Warehouse: Songs and Stories – was released between 1981 and 1987.

But amid this breakneck charge, one flex perhaps best sums up their power as a group: “New Day Rising” emerging blinking into the light in January 1985, only six months after Zen Arcade had blown hardcore up from the inside.

Zen Arcade was an album with a sense of scope that bled beyond its borders, a blockbuster nightmarescape that pushed Bob Mould, Grant Hart and Greg Norton as artists—not just punk kids out of the Twin Cities across four sides of vinyl. Shifting perspective again, New Day Rising was about refinement, and drilling down into the melodic smarts that allow us to view Hüsker Dü as a cornerstone of modern indie-rock. “I’m really glad New Day Rising was done and dusted before Zen Arcade really started to resonate,” guitarist-vocalist Mould wrote in his autobiography. “Can you imagine if we hadn’t had another record ready? We’d have been sitting around with the earth shaking underneath us, trying to get settled and centred enough to make another strong album but instead we struck while the iron is hot.”

Hüsker Dü’s music was always driven by tension – between Mould and drummer-vocalist Hart as songwriters, between the band and their label, SST Records, between the band and their hardcore purist fans, who were always one step away from crying sellout – and New Day Rising was no different.

With a power struggle ongoing between the trio, who sought to self-produce the LP, and SST’s in-house engineer Spot, who was forced upon them by the cash-conscious label, that tension is welded to the presentation of the songs. They’re scratchy and raw, washed out at times. They’re imperfect, just as Mould and Hart began to reach for pop-punk perfection with cast-iron classics such as “I Apologize” and “The Girl Who Lives on Heaven Hill”.

“They were kind of working from within a classic pop structure,” Spot told Michael Azerrad in Our Band Could Be Your Life. “And doing something else with it. Kind of like they broke into it with a coat hanger and got the keys out and went on a joy ride. And then wore the tires out.”

It’s entirely thrilling to see Mould, in particular, figure out what he’s capable of almost in real time. Celebrated Summer, from its coruscating, infinitely catchy riff through to its runaway train of a hook and pensive acoustic break, is close to a perfect encapsulation of the elements that would sustain a 40-year career. But Hart’sTerms of Psychic Warfare” – a wonderfully wonky, quasi-Stones styled pop-rocker – is just around the bend and shows him in lockstep with his bandmate.

The garbled jangle of Perfect Example is Mould finding the willingness to take his foot off the pedal, and also a snapshot of the drinking habit he carried throughout recording. “I was coming to the end of my drinking time and was realising I wasn’t the easiest person to be around at times,” . “I could be a fully functioning yet contrary alcoholic at 23 or 24. So songs like “I Apologize” are clearly me feeling like a bad young man, like I should apologise globally for something I probably did but was not fully aware of because I was drunk a lot.”

At this point Mould was playing Ibanez Flying Vs, with his graduation to Fender Strats still a few years down the road at the start of his solo career. A relic from this era also turned up on his searing 13th solo record Blue Hearts: a reissue ‘65 silverface Fender Deluxe. “That adds a lot of the constant, upper-mid saturation that you’re hearing on the record,” he told us last autumn.

New Day Rising was another outsider hit, and a line in the sand for Hüsker Dü. They’d put out three more records in their last two years together, with the (finally) self-produced Flip Your Wig released in September ’85. An almost faultless missive from the nascent indie-rock scene, it pushed the melodic envelope even further and set the table for their divisive decision to jump to a major for 1986’s Candy Apple Grey.

Eventually, addiction and infighting swallowed Hüsker Dü whole and they folded with more acrimony than ceremony in 1987. Mould got into acoustic writing with Workbook and ignited a power-pop renaissance with his band Sugar as the 80s ticked over into the 90s.  In 1994, he came out as gay in a article. “The army’s credo was ‘don’t ask, don’t tell,’” he told the Guardian last year. “In hardcore, it was ‘don’t advertise, don’t worry.’ I had a handful of casual encounters with guys on the road. But it was a community of misfits, and mostly no one cared what you did behind closed doors. 

Grant Hart and Norton also pursued their own careers, with Hart’s 1988 2541 EP tracing its roots back to writing sessions for New Day Rising. He’d later play with the underrated Nova Mob and release a run of solo records. After years of animosity and backbiting, Hüsker Dü’s three members patched things up long enough to work on the exceptional early years archive release Savage Young Dü, which was released only weeks after Hart’s death from liver cancer in September 2017.

The Band:

  • Bob Mould – vocals, guitar
  • Grant Hart – vocals, drums
  • Greg Norton – bass
Hüsker Dü - New Day Rising

bob mould

After a fleeting dalliance with optimism on last year’s Sunshine Rock, Bob Mould returns to rage on “Blue Hearts” — a punkish album that’s sometimes even more aggressive than the hardcore screeds he recorded 40 years ago with Hüsker Dü. He literally screams at Trump and evangelicals on “American Crisis,” which seems to juxtapose the way the Reagan administration ignored the AIDS epidemic with Trump’s lies about the Covid-19 pandemic. “I never thought I’d see this bullshit again,” he sings. The more tempered yet still caustic “Forecast of Rain” is Mould’s indictment of religious hypocrisy. “These fuckers tried to kill me once,” Mould said of his motivation on Blue Hearts. “I’m not going to sit quietly this time and worry about alienating anyone.”

Look, I get it. It’s not fun to think about how fucked up America is when you just want to listen to some songs in the car. Still, given how terrible pretty much everything has been for the last few years, it’s weird that there hasn’t been a larger resurgence in politically minded music. It’s fallen to older artists to address Trumpism and the toll it’s taken on the country. Bob Mould’s Blue Hearts is a furious broadside about the lies, hypocrisies and inhumane policies of the modern conservative movement, with “American Crisis” in particular reviving the pissed-off political consciousness of the early ‘80s hardcore scene Mould got his start in. Blue Hearts unites that “In a Free Land”-era anger with the pop song writing of peak Husker Du and the crunch of Mould’s recent solo albums, resulting in one of the most powerful records of the year.

Release date: September 25th From the album Blue Hearts, out on Merge Records.

 

Blue Hearts

Aggressive, loud and unrelenting – Bob Mould takes aim at the malaise of 2020 in the way only he can, showing the many Husker Du and Sugar aping bands just how it’s done.

Through some of the most direct, confrontational lyrics of his four-decade career, Mould makes his POV clear: “I never thought I’d see this bullshit again / To come of age in the ’80s was bad enough / We were marginalized and demonized / I watched a lot of my generation die / Welcome back to American crisis.”

Why “welcome back”? Because Mould experienced deja vu writing Blue Hearts in the fall of 2019. “Where it started to go in my head is back to a spot that I’ve been in before,” he says. “And that was the fall of 1983.” “where it started to go in my head is back to a spot that i’ve been in before,” he says. “and that was the fall of 1983.” back then, Mould was a self-described “22-year-old closeted gay man” touring with the legendary Hüsker Dü and seeing an epidemic consume his community. leaders, including the one in the white house, were content to let aids kill a generation. it’s been a long time since a power pop album has felt this present and pertinent, and who else but mould could bring that sound back to the forefront? “this is the catchiest batch of protest songs I’ve ever written in one sitting,” he says.

In the winter of 2019, Bob Mould bucked the era’s despair with his most melodic, upbeat album in ages, “Sunshine Rock”.

Cut to spring of 2020, and he has this to say: “We’re really in deep shit now.”

That sentiment informs the new full-length album, Blue Hearts (Merge Records, September 25th), the raging-but-catchy yin to Sunshine Rock’s yang.

To be sure, we were in some shit back in 2018, when Mould recorded Sunshine Rock with longtime colleagues Jon Wurster (drums), Jason Narducy (bass), and Beau Sorenson (engineer). Back then, he had a song called “American Crisis” that didn’t fit the album.

“That song is the seed for what we’re talking about now,” Mould says from his home in San Francisco during the COVID-19 lockdown. “At the time, it just seemed too heavy. Today it seems fucking quaint.”

“American Crisis” is the third song in a walloping first half of an album that spits plainspoken fire at the people who fomented this crisis. “This is the catchiest batch of protest songs I’ve ever written in one sitting,” he says.

Through some of the most direct, confrontational lyrics of his four-decade career, Mould makes his POV clear: “I never thought I’d see this bullshit again / To come of age in the ’80s was bad enough / We were marginalized and demonized / I watched a lot of my generation die / Welcome back to American crisis.”

“We have a charismatic, telegenic, say-anything leader being propped up by evangelicals,” he says. “These fuckers tried to kill me once. They didn’t do it. They scared me. I didn’t do enough. Guess what? I’m back, and we’re back here again. And I’m not going to sit quietly this time and worry about alienating anyone.”

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Recorded at the famed Electrical Audio in Chicago with Sorenson engineering and Mould producing, Blue Hearts nods to Mould’s past while remaining firmly planted in the issues of the day. Acoustic opener “Heart on My Sleeve” catalogues the ravages of climate change. “Next Generation” worries for who comes next. “American Crisis” references “Evangelical ISIS” and features this dagger of a line: “Pro-life, pro-life until you make it in someone else’s wife.”

“There are songs that have no room,” Mould says, laughing. “The other songs, there’s room. There is room for imagination on the second half of the record.”

That’s where the songs turn personal in a different way. Tracks like “When You Left,” “Siberian Butterfly,” and “Everyth!ng to You” are grounded in personal relationships. “Racing to the End” captures the economic disparity of Mould’s neighborhood, and “Leather Dreams”… well, maybe Jon Wurster put it best.

“Jon turns to Jason and asks, ‘Is this the dirtiest song you’ve ever played on?’” Mould recalls with a chuckle. “I clearly did not put the edit tool to that one. Those are all pretty true bits. What kind of person could possibly have a life like that?” He laughs again. “Says the author.”

“Leather Dreams,” “Password to My Soul,” and “The Ocean” were composed during a writing binge before a January 2020 Solo Electric tour, when Mould stayed up for three straight days. “Songs just kept coming out,” he says. “‘Leather Dreams’ and ‘The Ocean’ both appeared within hours. I barely remember writing them.”

That feels right for an explosive, hook-laden album like Blue Hearts. Only there’s nothing forgettable about it.

All songs written by Bob Mould

Bob Mould: Guitars, Vocals, Keyboards, Percussion
Jason Narducy: Bass, Backing Vocals
Jon Wurster: Drums, Percussion

Prague TV Orchestra: Strings on “American Crisis”

Released September 25th, 2020

Produced by Bob Mould
Engineered by Beau Sorenson

Distortion: 1989-1995

Demon Records presents “Distortion: 1989-1995” , the first in a series of four expansive vinyl box sets chronicling the solo career of legendary American musician Bob Mould.
Bob Mould is releasing this massive, career-spanning box set chronicling 30 years of his solo music, as well as his work in the band Sugar. Distortion: 1989-2019 arrives October 2nd (via Demon Music Group). The anthology includes 18 studio albums, four live albums, and two albums of rarities and collaborations, spanning the 24 CD set Distortion: 1989-2019 and the 8xLP collection Distortion: 1989-1995. Find images of the full set below, and scroll down to watch a 2005 live video of Mould performing Hüsker Dü’s “Could You Be the One?”; also, check out the trailer for Distortion.

Bob Mould’s career began in 1979 with the iconic underground punk group Hüsker Dü before forming the beloved alternative rock band Sugar and releasing numerous critically acclaimed solo albums. Volume one in this new series covers 1989 to 1995, beginning with Mould’s first post Hüsker Dü album workbook and continuing through to Sugar’s final studio album file under: Easy Listening.

“It’s called Distortion because it describes the music and it fits the world we live in,” Mould said of the box set in a press release. “In this new age, everybody shares their life in real time. But I’m not done yet. If I didn’t have a constantly active career, this anthology might feel like the proverbial dirt landing on top of my coffin—though somehow I seem to be able to crawl my way out of the dirt every time!” Of his 2005 performance of “Could You Be the One?” Mould said:

For years, I didn’t play any Hüsker Dü material with my subsequent touring bands. This was the first time my long time friend and colleague Jason Narducy (bass) played in my touring band. Rich Morel (keys) was my work partner for 11 years in BLOWOFF, and the 9:30 Club was home for our monthly dance party. Brendan Canty (drums) nudged me out of my self-imposed “rock retirement” after the 1998 Last Dog and Pony Show tour (which is also chronicled in the box set). Brendan’s company Trixie Productions filmed and edited the show.

Bob Mould’s next studio album “Blue Hearts” arrives September 25 via Merge Records.

• each album is presented with brand new artwork designed by illustrator Simon Marchner and pressed on 140g clear vinyl with unique splatter effects .

• includes a 28 page companion booklet featuring: liner notes by journalist Keith Cameron; a foreword by writer and actor Fred Armisen ; a tribute from Richard Thompson; lyrics and memorabilia. • mastered by Jeff Lipton and Maria Rice at peerless mastering in Boston.

• featuring an array of bonus tracks including Sugar’s 1995 collection of b sides and non album tracks besides , along with Distortion plus: 1989-1995 a new and exclusive collection of rarities and collaborations (pressed on clear vinyl).

• this indies exclusive edition is strictly limited to 750 copies worldwide and includes a 12”x12” screen print of the new Copper Blue album cover, hand signed by illustrator Simon Marchner and Bob Mould himself.

    1. lp 1: bob mould workbook side a 1. sunspots 2. wishing well 3. heartbreak a stranger 4. see a little light 5. poison years 6. sinners and their repentances side b 1. brasilia crossed with trenton 2. compositions for the young and old 3. lonely afternoon 4. dreaming, i am 5. whichever way the wind blows
    2. lp 2: bob mould black sheets of rain side a 1. black sheets of rain 2. stand guard 3. it’s too late 4. one good reason 5. stop your crying side b 1. hanging tree 2. the last night 3. hear me calling 4. out of your life 5. disappointed 6. sacrifice / let there be peace
    3. lp 3: sugar copper blue side a 1. the act we act 2. a good idea 3. changes 4. helpless 5. hoover dam side b 1. the slim 2. if i can’t change your mind 3. fortune teller 4. slick 5. man on the moon
    4. lp 4: sugar beaster side a 1. come around 2. tilted 3. judas cradle side b 1. jc auto 2. feeling better 3. walking away
    5. lp 5: sugar file under: easy listening side a 1. gift 2. company book 3. your favorite thing 4. what you want it to be 5. gee angel side b 1. panama city motel 2. can’t help you anymore 3. granny cool 4. believe what you’re saying 5. explode and make up
    6. lp 6 & 7: sugar besides side a 1. needle hits e 2. if i can’t change your mind (solo mix) 3. try again 4. where diamonds are halos (live) 5. armenia city in the sky (live) side b 1. clownmaster 2. anyone (live) 3. jc auto (live) 4. believe what you’re saying (campfire mix) 5. mind is an island side c 1. frustration 2. going home 3. in the eyes of my friends 4. and you tell me side d (bbc radio 1. if i can’t change your mind 2. hoover dam 3. the slim 4. where diamonds are halos
    7. lp 8: distortion plus: 1989 1995 side a 1. all those people know bob mould 2. no water in hell bob mould 3. dying from the inside out the golden palominos side b 1. dio throwing muses 2. hickory wind bob mould & vic chesnutt 3. can’t fight it bob mould 4. turning of the tide bob mouldBob Mould box set

BOB MOULD has released another track from his forthcoming album “Forecast of Rain” and an accompanying lyric video off of his explosive upcoming album Blue Hearts, which arrives via Merge Records on Friday, September 25.

“Forecast of Rain” is the second song released from Blue Hearts and follows provocative first single “American Crisis” from June. That song garnered great attention from the press, with Rolling Stone writing that it “vibrates with urgency,” NPR saying the song is “pure punk fury” and Paste describing the song as a “scabrous, pissed-off screed against the ‘fucked-up USA’ we’re living in.”

The 14-song album, will be Mould’s 14th and the follow-up to 2019’s Sunshine Rock, is due out September. 25th on Merge Records on LP, CD, something called “tri-color Peak Vinyl” and digital formats. “Forecast of Rain” was preceded by the fiery lead-off single “American Crisis.”

Of “Forecast of Rain,” Mould says:

“As a child, my mother took me to Sunday Mass. I’ve written many songs around religion. In the 2000s, I went back to the Catholic Church for three years — but I did not find my place. I recognize the importance of religion for those who believe: the worship, the rituals, the community; loving thy neighbour, following commandments, doing unto others as you would have them do unto you. In short, be nice to people, help however you can, and don’t steal stuff. But right now, I’m having a hard time understanding how certain religious sectarians can support the behaviour of those who occupy the People’s House. How can you endorse their disregard for truth? How can you tolerate the incessant vindictiveness? How can you stand by your man while people are teargassed to clear a path to the Lord’s House? I’m not good at quoting scripture, but I can manage two words: Jesus wept.”

The 14-song album, will be Mould’s 14th and the follow-up to 2019’s Sunshine Rock, is due out September. 25th on Merge Records on LP, CD, something called “tri-color Peak Vinyl” and digital formats. “Forecast of Rain” was preceded by the fiery lead-off single “American Crisis.”

From the album Blue Hearts, out September 25th on Merge Records

In the winter of 2019, Bob Mould bucked the era’s despair with his most melodic, upbeat album in ages, Sunshine Rock. Cut to spring of 2020, and he has this to say: “We’re really in deep shit now.”

That sentiment informs the new full-length album, Blue Hearts, the raging-but-catchy yin to Sunshine Rock’s yang. Recorded at the famed Electrical Audio in Chicago with Sorenson engineering and Mould producing, Blue Hearts nods to Mould’s past while remaining firmly planted in the issues of the day. Acoustic opener Heart on My Sleeve catalogues the ravages of climate change. Next Generation worries for who comes next. American Crisis references “Evangelical ISIS” and features this dagger of a line: “Pro-life, pro-life until you make it in someone else’s wife.”

Leather Dreams, Password to My Soul, and The Ocean were composed during a writing binge before a January 2020 Solo Electric tour, when Mould stayed up for three straight days. That feels right for an explosive, hook-laden album like Blue Hearts. Only there’s nothing forgettable about it.

http://

Releases September 25th, 2020

Produced by Bob Mould
Recorded at Electrical Audio, Chicago IL
Additional Recording at Granary Music, San Francisco CA
The Band:
Bob Mould: Guitars, Vocals, Keyboards, Percussion
Jason Narducy: Bass, Backing Vocals
Jon Wurster: Drums, Percussion

 

“An Obelisk” is the sixth album from Titus Andronicus, which finds the noted rock band under the stewardship of producer and legendary rocker Bob Mould (Hüsker Dü, Sugar, et al.). This trans-generational meeting of the minds has yielded the most immediate, intense, and unadorned Titus Andronicus record to date. Clocking in at a brisk 38 minutes and change, it is also the shortest. Recorded over six breathless days at Steve Albini’s world-renowned Electrical Audio studio in Chicago, An Obelisk presents the sound of Titus Andronicus, rock band, at its most irreducible, as monolithic as the album’s titular monument.

The official video for “Troubleman Unlimited” by Titus Andronicus, off the new album ‘An Obelisk,’ available June 21st from Merge Records.

The official video for “Tumult Around The World” by Titus Andronicus, off the new album ‘An Obelisk,’ available June 21st from Merge Records.

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In the first 15 seconds of his new video, Bob Mould tells the world: “Dictators, terrorists and tech companies have created an apocalyptic surveillance state. The Western world has fallen into a deep state of paranoia and disinformation.”

The video for Bob Mould’s new song, “Lost Faith” cuts to a scene of our protagonist, living in Germany, being interviewed by the media. From Mould’s paranoid point of view, all he can see are drones following him. And when the reporter asks, “What are you running from?” the music kicks in and Mould sings: “I’ve lost faith in everything / Everything, everything.” This could simply be the perfect song for our times, but what Mould does in “Lost Faith” (and elsewhere on his forthcoming album Sunshine Rock) is take the negativity and fear and locate the positive. “I know we all lose faith from time to time,” he sings. “You better find your way back home.”

New album ‘Sunshine Rock’ out Feb 8th, 2019!

Bob Mould is a legend, and his band Hüsker Dü informed a huge swath of music in the ’90s. These days, he is, in fact, living in Germany; it’s been a few years and he says he’s newly inspired. The new album is full of themes of sunshine instead of “black sheets of rain.”

Writing via email, Mould says of “Lost Faith” that “there’s a hint of migration, a dash of border security and a whisper of government surveillance, climaxing across the multicolored canvas of an abandoned NSA listening station perched atop the highest hill in Berlin. But at the end of the day, it’s a high-end music video for a catchy, inspirational, uplifting pop song.”

From the album Sunshine Rock, out February 8th, 2019 on Merge Records.

No photo description available.