Posts Tagged ‘Stockholm’

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Stockholm’s Les Big Byrd are back with their new EP “Roofied Angels” due out on June 26th on limited edition 12” vinyl and with the A-side and title track released digitally in May. Roofied Angels is the first piece of new music from Les Big Byrd since 2018’s acclaimed Iran Iraq IKEA LP outside of the instrumental “Snö-Golem” 7” from last fall and the English language version of the band’s 2017 hit “Two Man Gang” which was released in May 2019. The 7 minute fuzz-blizzard “Roofied Angels” might just be the best thing the band’s put their name to yet, melding Motörhead and Shangri-La’s influences into their krautrock infused psychedelic rock, while bringing to mind the heavier side of the band’s 2014 debut LP They Worshipped Cats and was recorded during the sessions for the band’s upcoming third full-length.
Releases June 26th, 2020

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I Break Horses is the musical project led by Maria Lindén. From her Stockholm base, the Swedish artist delivered an extraordinary debut album in the shape of ‘Hearts’, released by Bella Union in August 2011. Having last week announced their return via the track ‘Death Engine’, today I Break Horses have unveiled a visually striking video for new single ‘I’ll Be The Death Of You’ from their upcoming third LP Warnings, released 8th May via Bella Union Records

There’s a certain thrill in putting a playlist of your favorite songs on shuffle and eagerly anticipating what comes up next. But as I grow older and less exciting, I’m finding that there’s also a certain thrill in listening to the same song repeatedly—a practice made particularly easy when the song is approximately five minutes long, generally hypnotic, and never really progresses at any point. “I’ll Be the Death of You” is this idyllic type of song in its purest form, comprised of lullaby vocals and flatlined synth beats upbeat enough to never get stale. The softcore homicidal lyrics are pretty cool, too.

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Stockholm’s finest, Viagra Boys are back with an incredible EP. They’ve also announced some tour dates for November too. One of them being here in Manchester. Common Sense” consists of 4 songs that will unapologetically annihilate you. Sebastian’s voice never sounded better, and that sax will always be a welcomed sound on a Viagra Boys song. The title track feels like Sebastian having a word with himself, but at the same time you can think of about 5 people this song could be applicable to. We all know someone who may go too far and is a little too self-destructive. The way in which Sebastian sings this is like someone who is completely wired at 4am and is having a heart to heart with themselves. 

“Lick The Bag” where oh where do we even start with this. It’s a rebellious song, and you can completely imagine everyone going batshit to this at their shows. There is something so sordid and beautifully depraved about this, and fellow shrimps will be obsessed with this. Viagra Boys are an exciting band, and even that doesn’t do them justice. Their cult-like following and dedication from the fans is truly beautiful. Lick The Bag will hopefully become everything Sports has become. An iconic song for our generation. The thing is, Viagra Boys just put out incredible music and their songs just mess with your mind.

That’s part of the charm. Everything about what they do just corrupts your mind, and you probably wouldn’t have it any other way. I love everything about their slick style, and how they just do it their way. It is truly unlike anything else, and this new EP is a perfect demonstration of this.

“Sentinel Island” is probably my favourite track off the EP right now. I’ve played this one a few more times than the others. I love the instrumental at the end, and again it is one I’m pretty sure will be wild in their live shows. The EP ends on “Blue” this will break your heart. It’s so brutally honest, and it has this insane Blues feel to it. Think of Willis Earl Beal meeting Stiv Bators. It is powerful and soulful; it’s a bold way to end the record but it also shows us just how effortlessly brilliant they are.

Two songs on the record to make you gently weep, and two in the middle to make you just rip shit up! there’s no other band out there that you’d want to do this to you. You’re going to fall in love with Common Sense. It’s got everything you’d expect and not expect from them. The twists and the turns in their sound is what makes Viagra Boys a truly standout band, and this EP is just a little taster of what’s to come.

 

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As Swedish noise quartet Les Big Byrd release their new single,Snö-Golem we look forward to a limited edition 7″ vinyl due to hit the shelves soon. The Swedish four-piece Les Big Byrd appeared in the spring of 2011 like a freshly hatched egg, if not a noisy, mind-bending, reverb-drenched, guitar-heavy drone pop egg, but fresh nonetheless.

A limited edition 7” single released ahead of their imminent European tour, the heavy ‘Snö-Golem’ is the first taste from Les Big Byrd’s upcoming third album, due for release in the beginning of 2020. The Stockholm-based four-piece show off the krautrock influences in their sound more prominently here.

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Their sound is a melodic, melancholic, psychedelic masterpiece that is both manic and understated, you could pop this four in your headphones and lose whole days to it, it’s a glorious noise.

Their first release, single Zig-Smile, came with a remix by Carli Löf of Savage Skulls and Stay Gold fame and was met with rapturous applause from pretty much all corners.

Their first album, They Worshipped Cats, saw the light of day in 2014, and was described by Gothenburg Post as a heady mix of krautrock and psychedelics, and it is hard to argue with that.

The band’s second album, Iran Iraq Ikea was released in the autumn of 2018, and according to lead vocalist, Jocke Åhlund, it is about “ageing and feeling pissed off” with the wider world. If you haven’t heard of Les Big Byrd, “Snö-Golem” gives you a snippet of their heavier krautrock sound, it was released on September 19th digitally, the limited edition 7” vinyl is due on the shelves on November 29th.

Les Big Byrd is Joakim ÅhlundFrans JohanssonMartin “Konie” Ehrencrona and Nino Keller and their third LP is due out at the start of 2020.

Stockholm band Melby bring a mildly psychedelic and moody outlook to dream pop on debut full-length, “None of the This Makes Me Worry”. While the band favors strong, instantly earworm-y melodies and baroque instrumental choices, the songs here are just slightly too long, sophisticated, and altogether downbeat to be pigeonholed as sunshine pop. But there’s also a playfulness in Melby’s approach that recalls psych’s more childlike impulses, with Matilda Wiezell’s subtly emotive vocals contributing to the band’s balance of modern and warmly nostalgic sounds.

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Debut LP ‘None of this makes me worry’ out April 12th via RamaLama Records and Sinnbus

released April 12th, 2019

All songs performed and arranged by Are Engen Steinsholm, Matilda Wiezell, David Jehrlander & Teodor Jernkvist.

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During September 1968 the Doors made their first trip to Europe for a tour that saw them paired with the Jefferson Airplane, far from the eyes of the world they played intimate concerts for audiences who where not there for the event but to listen and watch the performers, the tour was a major success in terms of attendance and in terms of artistic satisfaction from the band that equated to some of the best performances the band would ever perform.

These performances are an eye-opener if you’ve never heard them before. What you get is a wowser recording of an in-shape, ready to kill you Jim Morrison. The man is out for blood and it shows. The only thing wrong here, and it’s the Only thing is that Jim is off mike for the first “When The Music’s Over”. The recording is clear enough that you can just about hear him, but alas there is nothing that can be done about that now. The material itself is stellar and the band is in top form. Enjoy this show, it’s a mind-ripper.

On September 20th, 1968 The Doors played two concerts the Konserthuset in Stockholm, Sweden and gave permission for both to be broadcast on radio station Radiohuset. The resulting recordings give a prime example of the band at the height of their collective powers and are the source for many bootlegs. On vinyl the shows have been released as The Beautiful Die Young… (MIW Records 19) featuring parts of both early and late shows, The Complete Stockholm ’68 Tapes(DOORS 68) and deluxe 3 lp set containing both the early and late shows, Little Games (Shotgun Records 13010) that is a mix of both early and late shows,The Stockholm Tapes(unknown label) another 3 lp set packaged in a box with a deluxe cover. On CD there have been releases as Live In Stockholm(The Swinging Pig TSP CD-004-2) that featured both early and late shows on a 2CD set,Live In Stockholm ’68 Vol. 1 and Vol. 2(Black Panther CD 30/31) that were copies of the Swinging Pig title, The Lizard King (Vulture Records 002) a mix of both early and late shows on a single disc,Red Walls Blue Doors (WPOCM CD 1288D012-2) featuring only the late show,The Stockholm Tapes (DR 010) featuring only the late show,Sneaking Out The Backdoor(The Last Bootleg Records LBR SP 001/7) features both early and late shows, and Apocalypse Now (Kiss The Stone KTS 267), an excellent title featuring the late show.

The Doors, live at Konserthuset, Stockholm on 20th September 1968 The Doors finally visited Europe in September 1968, playing to rapturous audiences in the UK, Germany, Holland, Denmark and Sweden. Many fans agree that they were at their peak on this tour, despite Jim Morrison’s condition being unpredictable from gig to gig. This release contains the final date of the tour, originally broadcast by Sveriges Radio. It includes rare performances of Mack The Knife, Love Street and You’re Lost Little Girl as well as familiar staples of their set, and is presented here together with background notes and images.

The recording begins with the call to arms of “Five To One”, one can take many interpretations to Jim’s lyrics, the best I had read was five to one is the ratio to people under the age of 30 outnumber the old five to one. Of course the radio station does not censor the “I Got in this car with these people and get …f*cked up”, Jim slurring his words in true bluesman tradition. To show their respect from the European audiences the band treat them to an impromptu version of “The Ballad Of Mack The Knife” by Weill and Bretcht that was made famous by Frank Sinatra in America that flows right into the same song writing duo’s “Alabama Song” aka “Whiskey Bar”, a song the band adapted for their first self title LP. The song flows right into the abrupt riff of Willie Dixon’s “Backdoor Man”, played in true blues fashion. Morrison lets yell with a manic laugh before the band slows it down for the pork and beans section, the song is a prime example of their blues origins and garners a huge round of applause before Morrison tells them “Stop That”.

A real highlight of this recording is the bands rendition of “Your Lost Little Girl”, rarely played on stage the melancholy playing of Robby Krieger is wonderful and Morrison turns in a beautiful vocal for the song, no screaming and yelling on this song. “Love Me Two Times” from the Strange Days record was a true Krieger song, the lyrics much more about simple love and curiously would prove to be The Doors most radio friendly songs. A true centerpiece of most all Doors shows is “When The Music’s Over”, dense with mysterious lyrics and some of the most powerful music the band would ever explore it features Morrison at his most dramatic. All three musicians solo at one time or another, they blend the instruments as an accent to the lyrics. John Densmore goes from keeping simple time to answering Morrison in a point blank response accentuating message. The lyrics are expansive, moving from psychedelia to powder struggles to a commentary of the abuse of resources, all leading to a demand of “We Want The World and We Want It NOW “, Morrison keeping the audience on edge before finally letting out a huge yell in true dramatic fashion. The song again garners a huge ovation with the audience clapping and shouting their approval, one can only agree.

Curiously the band play an early version of “Wild Child”, a song that would not find its way onto a Doors record for close to a year until the release of 1969’s The Soft Parade. It started appearing in the bands set early the prior month of August 2nd at the band’s chaotic performance at the Singer Bowl in Flushing Meadows, New York. This version is much subdued to that version largely due to the circumstances, but we are treated to a superb rendition of the song and is nice to be able fully enjoy. They continue with their take on the Gordy / Robinson classic “Money”, a song that they had been playing since their early incarnation of the band in their pub days. They play a laid back version of the song that features song great Manzerek keys as he hammers out a great solo, the song simply swings as the band hit their stride.

“Light My Fire” is the culmination of Doors Concerts, its there most popular song and therefore is the one that people clamor to hear. Live versions are always extended, to give a showcase to move through music themes such as jazz, Manzerek, Krieger, and Densmore were all aficionados of the form and this song is their vehicle to express it. This version clocks in at over 11 minutes and features a long center section where they free form the music with teases of Coltrane’s “My Favorite Things”, Morrison does enter the fray at about 8 minutes in when he asks “why you jump up my ass…what did you come hear for anyway?” in some obvious dialog with an audience member and forces the band to abruptly go back into the main theme of the song and push Morrison’s focus back to the music.

The set concludes appropriately as Morrison asks for the lights to be lowered and only use the blue lights, there is a small language barrier with the operators and the band chants “turn out the lights” before Jim lets out a quieting “sshh” and Krieger hits the opening chords of “The End”. The song has much evolved from its early incarnations of a song of loves departed; now it is an apocalyptic masterpiece of theatre set to music. The song clocks in at close to 15 minutes in length and features a variety of lyric poems by Jim that culminates with the Oedipal section, perhaps it most moving yet frightening piece that polarized listeners as far back as the groups pre record deal days at the Whisky A Go Go. Live versions of this song are always an event, this is certainly one, if not my most favorite version (the Singer Bowl is awesome too). The end of the set and of a most successful European tour as the band leaves the stage amid respectful applause.

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Stockholm-based Delsbo Beach Club have been one of this year’s most frequent live acts on the capital’s indie scene and are set to release their instantly charming debut single All The Way Home on Swedish label Rama Lama Records (Steve Buscemi’s Dreamy Eyes, Melby).

The track, a fine representation of the band’s expertly crafted sound, finds its irresistible strength in their fuzzy indie pop melodies, with hints of classic garage and surf rock drawing early comparisons to the likes of Mac DeMarco.

Having formed when frontman Erik Björklund moved to Stockholm from northern Swedish city Umeå and began recording a ton of bedroom pop demos, before joining together with Alexander Kuronen (drums), Max Englund (guitar) and Aron Lange (bass), the band have since developed into an infectious live outfit and will release their debut EP early next year.

Stockholm band Delsbo Beach Club’s debut single, out on all platforms via Rama Lama Records Oct 11th

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Band Members
Erik Björklund
Jesper Jonason
Alexander Kuronen
Stas Neilyk
Ebba Vikdahl

Dungen and Woods, photo by <a href="http://www.alexmarksphotography.com/">Alex Marks</a>

The third in the Marfa Myths series of releases will be seven all-new songs written and recorded by Stockholm’s psychedelic masters Dungen in collaboration with adventurous Brooklyn indie-folk pioneers Woods.

Dungen and Woods teamed up for a new collaborative album titled: Myths 003 (due out March 16th via Mexican Summer) the tracks were born from the bands’ recording residency at the 2017 Marfa Myths festival in Texas. Along with the LP announcement, the groups have shared a new song called “Turn Around.” This year’s Marfa Myths takes place April 12th-15th. The 2018 artists in residence will be Bradford Cox (of Deerhunter and Atlas Sound) and Cate Le Bon.

On the face of it, it should be a match made in musical heaven and judging by the languid, exploratory, and dynamic, first track “Turn Around”, we’re in for a treat with the full album. Listen below to the track . The album is out on March 16th.

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The second album from Stockholm-based songwriter Hannes Ferm, aka HOLY, considers where our subconscious goes at night: dreams, pent-up emotions, possibilities of unknown dimensions. “I wanted to go beyond my outer limits,” he says, leaving behind the garage pop of his 2015 debut for widescreen studio-science and rock opera ambition. The record borrows its name from astronomer Jon Willis’ book All These Worlds Are Yours: The Scientific Search for Alien Life. “Ferm’s search starts within his own head, “says KEXP, likening his sound to Tame Impala and glam-era David Bowie. “A pervasive feeling of alienation feeds into the dynamism of the album.” It sees release on PNKSLM Recordings.

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Tracing Bruce Springsteen’s career arc from cult artist to superstar, theater to arena headliner, there’s a case to be made that a series of radio broadcasts on the 1978 Darkness On the Edge of Town tour played a significant role. The five home-recorded, fan-traded and oft-bootlegged concerts from The Roxy, The Agora, The Capitol Theater, The Fox Theatre and Winterland captured and ultimately spread the magic of Bruce and the E Street Band’s live show, and seemingly converted thousands to fill arenas two years later on the River tour.

Despite that rich history, there were no live broadcasts from the River tour, the Born in the U.S.A. tour or the U.S. leg of the Tunnel of Love tour. Which is why in 1988, after ten years of radio silence, the announcement that a portion of Springsteen’s July 3rd show in Stockholm would be broadcast live via satellite to the U.S. and the world was huge news for fans.

Like many among us, I tuned in that Fourth of July weekend and heard a potent 90-minute first set that wrapped with Bruce announcing plans to join the Amnesty International tour before wrapping the broadcast portion with a cover of Bob Dylan’s “Chimes Of Freedom” (later released on the EP of the same name). It was the first of hundreds of listens to follow.

Conveniently apportioned to fill a 90-minute cassette tape, the Stockholm broadcast joined the five ‘78 b-casts as the most played live Springsteen recordings most of us had. There was just one problem: as great as those 14 songs were, 20 other songs were played in Stockholm after the satellite feed came down, and short of a crummy audience tape, few of us have had a chance to hear the full show, until now.

Happily, this complete, multi-track recording validates what we all presumed: the Stockholm show was one of the best on the Tunnel tour, offering a passionate, hyper-focused first-set and–freed from the pressure of a global listening audience–a rollicking, playful second set and encore. Looking for a sign of Springsteen’s mood after the transmission ended? How about the inclusion of Gary U.S. Bonds’ ultimate party track “Quarter to Three” for the first time since 1981.

Fondness for the familiar first set is richly deserved. It starts with Bruce inviting the audience in the stadium and at home to come aboard with a wonderful “Tunnel of Love,” now followed by a horn-blasting “Boom Boom’ (with its unabashed sentiment of “I need you right now” replacing “Be True,” performed in this slot for most of the US leg). The brazen John Lee Hooker cover forms a bond of emancipation with what follows, “Adam Raised a Cain,” again propelled by the five-piece Horns of Love. Bruce hadn’t toured with a horn section since ‘77 and their presence is a critical component in the distinct sound and theatrics of ‘88 shows.

Because the broadcast was limited to 90 minutes, the first set showcased key Tunnel tracks, including a majestic “Tougher Than the Rest,” “Spare Parts,” “Brilliant Disguise” and “All That Heaven Will Allow.” Bruce also featured two killer non-album tracks: “Roulette,” unforgivably left off The River, but resuscitated to sound an alarm on the Tunnel tour; and “Seeds,” another take on the plight of working-class Americans and this time they’re pissed.

Perhaps the surprise highlight of the first set is “Born in the U.S.A.” Separated from its namesake tour and attendant misinterpretations, the song’s deep-seated anger is rekindled. Listen to Bruce’s shrieks of angst before Max’s drum crescendo, echoed later his own impassioned guitar solo. The story has grown more personal, too, as Springsteen adds new flashback lyrics after the final verse: “I just want your arms around me/I see the fire from the sky/I need your arms around me.” A stunning performance.

Set two is a totally different animal, but no less satisfying. I have often wondered how a seemingly long-forgotten song returns to the set, and there is no better example of this than the sudden reappearance of the instrumental “Paradise By the ‘C’” which opens the second set, after premiering four nights earlier in Rotterdam. What prompted its resurrection, after going unplayed since the Darkness tour? Sure, it suits the horns, but then again, there was no horn section in ‘78.

Regardless, it is a welcome showcase for Clarence and the Horns of Love, and sets the tone for a highly entertaining second set that milks the expanded band lineup and staging dynamics for all they are worth on songs like “You Can Look (But You Better Not Touch)” (which begins with a long, bit of musical teasing and showmanship often referred to as “Don’t You Touch That Thing”), “I’m A Coward” (Springsteen’s comic rewrite of Gino Washington’s ‘60s original) and a chock full o’ horns encore sequence of “Sweet Soul Music,” “Raise Your Hand,” the aforementioned “Quarter to Three,” and the inevitable last song for a show this joyous, “Twist and Shout.”

There are a few serious moments in the back half, among them the fine ‘88 arrangement of Bo Diddley’s “Who Do You Love?” into “She’s the One,” the first “Downbound Train” of the tour, and an unflinchingly earnest reading of Elvis’ “Can’t Help Falling in Love.” Interestingly, Stockholm ‘88 has a connection to Springsteen on Broadway in that the solo acoustic version of “Born to Run” that Bruce is currently performing was first played in that arrangement on the Tunnel Of Love tour, a fine take of which is captured here.

Stockholm ‘88 has always been a fan-favorite because of the simulcast. Now restored to full length and remixed from the master tapes, it rightly joins Springsteen’s other legendary radio broadcasts as one of the best concert recordings of his career and a great representation of the Tunnel of Love tour’s European edition.

thanks E Flanagan