Posts Tagged ‘Speedy Ortiz’

“DTMFA” was the last song I wrote and recorded for the Sad13 album, but something about it felt yacht rock i.e. better suited for Speedy Ortiz. So with some synth leads swapped for guitar lines, it was one of the first we worked on as a band for Twerp Verse, and a live staple in 2016. The Poet’s Seat is an observation tower in Western Mass, which I was visiting around the time I wrote this. I was also carrying around a tincture that was supposed to help me commune with ghosts. Basically, looking for guidance any place I could find it, because I really needed to DTMFA, the motherfucker being all my stupid baggage. We’re happy it has a home with the Adult Swim Singles Series alongside our 2014 entry “Bigger Party,” one of the earliest Speedy demos I made which was quite literally about a time I made out with all of the person I liked’s friends. Faux pas!!! I’m way older and wiser now and hopefully I’ve been forgiven!!! Even though I’m never that sorry.
Releases October 12th, 2019
Advertisements

It’s a beautiful exciting week in the land of Speedy Ortiz because they released a new song! I am pumping it right now and this rips!

The song is called “Blood Keeper,” and it’s a Liz Phair cover in celebration of Speedy Ortiz joining Liz Phair on tour starting today . “Blood Keeper” is available on Bandcamp and all proceeds for the single are being donated to purchase venues along the tour copies of Making Spaces Safer, a how-to guidebook from AK Press by Shawna Potter of War on Women!

n celebration of their tour with Liz Phair, Speedy Ortiz has covered this track a Scream 2 soundtrack outtake, written by Phair. The pay-what-you-want Bandcamp proceeds will fund providing each venue on the tour with copies of Shawn Potter’s (War On Women) pocket guide, “Making Spaces Safer.”

http://

This October, Speedy Ortiz is also touring the UK for the first time in three years! The shows begin on Wednesday, October 17th in London until Thursday, October 25th in Bristol! More info is available in the TOUR DATES section!!

Released September 5th, 2018
Recorded by Speedy Ortiz
Mixing & artwork by Sadie Dupuis
Sadie Dupuis – guitar, synth, vocals
Michael Falcone – drums
Darl Ferm – bass
Andy Molholt – guitar, synth

 

Image result for a pile of vinyl images

There are some great releases out this week, with the new Blossoms LP having been eagerly awaited by everyone from the young to the… less young,  There is a standard CD edition and a deluxe 2CD edition (inc. acoustic versions of all the tracks on the album), a standard LP and an in-store only deluxe LP with the same acoustic versions as found on the CD!  Also a new Okkervil River LP which, though more political, still maintains the playful but sincere songwriting charm and perfectly measured anthemic melodicism we’ve come to expect from them.

As well as those two, a superb new Speedy Ortiz you really need to hear this one, it’s excellent and an evolved follow-up to 2014’s ‘Hills End’ from the DMA’s, mixing the jangling britpop era guitars of Oasis etc with some more refined production, and psychedelic influence from the years since the britpop ‘boom’.

Blossoms cly standard cvr %28002%29

Blossoms – Cool Like You

Blossoms second album sees them return with 11 tracks of 80s inspired synth-layered pop bliss. On lead single I Can’t Stand It, the band bring the tempo up and combine it with cascading synth riffs, while There’s A Reason Why (I Never Returned Your Calls) brings a previously unheard anthemic rock quality to the bands sound.

Forthwanderers forthwanderers 2400

Forth Wanderers  –  Forth Wanderers

Forth Wanderers employ a tin-can-telephone style of composition which they use even when living in the same area code. Since first collaborating in 2013 as Montclair, New Jersey high schoolers, guitarist and songwriter Ben Guterl and vocalist Ava Trilling have passed songs back and forth like pen pals. Guterl will devise an instrumental skeleton before sending it to vocalist Ava Trilling who pens the lyrics based off the melody. The duo then gather alongside guitarist Duke Greene, bassist Noah Schifrin, and drummer Zach Lorelli to expand upon the demo. It’s a patient and practiced writing system that has carried the quintet through two EPs (2013’s Mahogany and 2016’s Slop) and one LP (2014’s Tough Love). Forth Wanderers, the group’s sophomore record and Sub Pop debut, is the groups’ most comprehensive and assured statement yet.

Now living in Ohio and New York respectively, Guterl and Trilling have evolved their separate but collaborative writing process. “The only way I can really write is by myself in my room with a notebook, listening to the song over and over again,” Trilling says. “I’ve never sat down to write a story, I write the song as it unfolds.” Since her lyrics are often embedded with intimate truths from her life, the private writing experience often leads to intense self-reflection.

On Forth Wanderers these introspections include meditations on relationships, discovery, and finding oneself adrift. Despite the inherent heaviness of those themes, Forth Wanderers feels joyous, a rock record bursting with heart. Take “Not for Me,” a romping track about “the ambivalence of love.” Trilling’s confession of “I can’t feel the earth beneath my feet/Flowers bloom but not for me” resists feeling like a dreary, pitying complaint; instead, as her bandmates bolster her melancholy with interlocking harmonic intricacies, she soars with self-actualization. Opener “Nevermine,” is a surge of confidence inspired by an ex-lover who is still captivated by her image. “I don’t think I know who you are anymore/And I think I knew who I was before,” she jabs with relish. On “Ages Ago” Trilling paints the image of a constantly-shifting enigmatic lover. “I wasn’t sure who they were, they changed constantly (hence the metaphor describing the “grey coat” and cutting their hair just to “stay afloat”),” she says. “I wasn’t going to wait any longer to find out.”

Recorded over five days by friend and audio engineer Cameron Konner at his Philadelphia home studio, Forth Wanderers amplifies the heartfelt sentiments of their earlier works into massive anthems. Guterl and Greene’s guitars have never sounded sharper, Schifrin and Lorelli’s terse rhythm section is restless, and Trilling sounds more self-assured than ever. These are exuberant, profound songs driven by tightly bound melodies and a loving attention to detail.

Dmas small

DMA’s  –   For Now

Produced by the band alongside Kim Moyes of The Presets, For Now is a gloriously uplifting album of beautifully honed, passionately emotive rock’n’roll songs. A teaser of what to expect emerged late last year when intro track Dawning was released. Demonstrating that the DMA’S are brimming with confidence, its crowd-pleasing hook and rich melodies made for the kind of timeless indie anthem that bands rarely seem to write any more.While the collection echoes the strident, hook-heavy Britpop and Madchester influences of the band’s debut on tracks such as the explosive opener For Now and Depeche Mode-esque Do I Need You Now?, it’s also an album that demonstrates a very organic evolution. The End (written by guitarist Johnny Took) shows Kim Moyes’ influence with its dark electronic production and synths, while the psychedelic-tinged Emily Whyte (written by guitarist Matt Mason) erupts into an epic, blissed out album closer.

A1521335121 16

Speedy Ortiz  – Twerp Verse

“Necessary brattiness” is the motto for Speedy Ortiz’s dauntless new collection of songs, Twerp Verse, out via Carpark Records. The follow-up to 2015’s acclaimed Foil Deer, the band’s latest indie rock missive is prompted by a tidal wave of voices, no longer silent on the hurt they’ve endured from society’s margins. But like many of these truth-tellers, songwriter, guitarist and singer Sadie Dupuis scales the careful line between what she calls being “outrageous and practical” in order to be heard at all. Twerp Verse, Speedy’s third album and first with Philadelphian Andy Molholt (Laser Background) on second guitar, is urgent and taut, adding surprising textures like Linn drums and whirled guitar processing to their off- kilter hooks. The band’s camaraderie and crate-digging is evident, with diffuse reference points like Squeeze, Hop Along, Prince, Paramore, and Brenda Lee being sucked into the band’s chaos. Even when Dupuis sings of alienation and political weariness, the pop maelstrom swirling around her provides a defiantly charged, mussed-but-hooky optimism.

LP+ – Deluxe LP is pink coloured vinyl with rainbow splatter in Gatefold jacket. Includes Bonus 7” (A Side: Le Mans B Side: Saint Fret) Includes Lyric Sheet Insert and Download.

Tiny ruins some were meant for sea preview

Tiny Ruins – Some Were Meant For Sea

Reissue of the New Zealanders album on Gold vinyl with Download Code. Never before released on vinyl in the UK the album, Some Were Meant For Sea exists in dappled warmness: Fullbrook’s striking vocal timbre conjuring a natural imagery born from earth and sea. Recorded in a diminutive hall, once the local school of South Gippsland, Fullbrook worked with producer J Walker (Holly Throsby, Machine Translations) and between the pair, some cello, violin, piano and accordion were added to the otherwise bare-boned songs, which were all recorded entirely live.

Speedy Ortiz, Twerp Verse

The run up to Twerp Verse, the third record from Speedy Ortiz, has intoduced three vibrant music videos. Each one taps into the sardonic wit and playful imagination of its singer, guitarist and lyrical mastermind of Sadie Dupuis, but the video for “Villain” (directed in a crayon box array of retro colors by Elle Schneider) is especially powerful at distilling her message to something tangible. Recreating the campy feel of a monster flick, Dupuis is relentlessly provoked by a fish-headed creature, a surreal embodiment of invasive verbal abuse and physical harassment that women endure daily. “‘I wanna know what kind of games you like,'” she recounts, before recoiling at these unwanted advances: “He talks like he knows me, so I’m being polite.” Later, she sings “‘I wanna know if a no means alright.’ / He looks past my answer, did he earn the right? No way.” — a dark inverse to her consent-positive mantra in “Get A Yes,” a fizzy gem from Dupuis‘ solo project Sad13.

While the concepts at play in “Villain” are familiar territory Dupuis and Speedy Ortiz have covered in the past, she’s never been quite this direct. Surprisingly, these themes weren’t initially the album’s intended direction. As the story goes, the band was primed to record in late 2016, but soon decided that batch of songs were “strictly personal or lovey-dovey” and no longer felt relevant amid the cultural and political shifts occurring post election. “Social politics and protest have been a part of our music from day one, and I didn’t want to stop doing that on this album,” Dupuis stated in the album’s press release. The band shelved those efforts mid-stream and doubled-down to write new material that better reflected these turbulent, unprecedented times. The result, Twerp Verse, shows Speedy Ortiz at its most pointed and fearless.

With a Master’s degree in poetry and a reputation for skillful, hilarious wordplay, Dupuis is among rock’s more compelling songwriters. Across Twerp Verse’s 11 tracks, she rapidly slings pop culture and literary references and shrouds her narratives in cryptic, visceral phrases worthy of decoding. And it gives license to speak hard truths and reveal personal anxieties — be it falling back into the familiar comforts of bad relationships (“Backslidin'”) or mining contradictory feelings on love and commitment (“Moving In”). “Lucky 88” critiques the head-in-the-sand apathy and disillusionment of people watching the world crumble around them. “One more time with reeling / You siphoned out the feeling / Can’t you act responsibly? / You’re the sick pup who created me,” she sings, before repeating “I don’t care anymore…” with weary resignation. But Dupuis is best when wielding humor and sarcasm — and taking no prisoners. “You Hate The Title” is a withering rebuke of haters publicly nitpicking someone’s opinions and creative endeavors, while still “singing along.” “You hate the title but you’re digging the song / You like it in theory, but it’s rubbing you wrong,” she seethes atop fluttering keyboards that belie her fed-up side-eye. “I can’t, I can’t, with your ‘Just can’t even’s.”

Recorded at Silent Barn in Brooklyn with Carlos Hernandez and Julian Fader (Ava Luna) and produced and mixed by Mike Mogis (Bright Eyes) at his studio in Omaha, Twerp Verse is both musically expansive and Dupuis’ most accessible work yet, a blend of catchy pop hooks and dexterous guitar playing. “Buck Me Off” opens with that signature Speedy Ortiz formula, and the band — comprised of bassist Darl Ferm, drummer Mike Falcone, and guitarist Andy Molholt — outright shreds with overdriven chords and buzzy solos piercing through murky distortion. Similarly “Sport Death” unfurls razor-sharp riffs that mimic the vocal melodies, and builds tension through off-kilter chord progressions and half-step dissonance. Elsewhere, they fold in pitch-shifted tones, pulsing synths, and laptop beats (“Lucky 88”) and skin-crawling atmosphere (“I’m Blessed”) — something first hinted at on 2015’s Foil Deer, and honed further on Sad13’s 2016 record, Slugger — and invigorates what can be tricky subject matter with immediate uplift and noisy catharsis.

That’s emblematic of “Alone With Girls” and “I’m Blessed,” in which Speedy Ortiz both alludes to emotional bullying and violence in past toxic relationships, and uses its platform to amplify the voices and stories too often silenced or marginalized. ” Lean In When I Suffer,” the album’s anthem, refutes self-branded feminist allies who only appear supportive when they don’t have to address their own privilege or problematic behavior. She’s having none of that, quipping “I’m checking my phone / He’s unworthy of talk / If he really wants to be the one, he’d forfeit shotgun for once…” It’s in these moments, Speedy Ortiz’s songs become about reclaiming agency, and finding empowerment through empathy. In that way, Twerp Verse is an album arriving right on time.

thanks to Npr

SPEEDYORTIZbestHORIZ.jpg

Speedy Ortiz  is back, The Fabulous front woman Sadie Dupuis has mastered the balance of playing familiar material from her band’s early catalog while letting what’s on the horizon shine. Speedy Ortiz performed twice during SXSW during the week, and while the setlists were different, each was book ended with ear candy from the excellent albums  Foil Deer and Major Arcana albums, both are filled with gems,  Sadie has a penchant for writing great songs like the triumphant “Lucky 88”—from the band’s upcoming newest and upcoming album Twerp Verse (out April 27 on Carpark). Always eclectically dressed and with an array of ornate headpieces, Dupuis is so delightful to see and hear live. She frequently loses herself in the bombastic music played by her band, but always maintains her presence onstage, to the point that you can feel her cycling through the thoughts and emotions of her intriguing songwriting.

http://

“Lean In When I Suffer” is the second single from Speedy Ortiz’s forthcoming album, “Twerp Verse,” out April 27th on Carpark Records.

 

Image may contain: 1 person, indoor

Speedy Ortiz  have announced their first release in over two years, and their first proper full-length since 2015’s Foil Deer. “Twerp Verse” is out on April 27th via Carpark Records, and in tandem with their new album’s announcement, Sadie Dupuis and company have also shared the video for synths and sardonic lead single “Lucky 88,” in which Dupuis declares, “I don’t care anymore.”

Dupuis explained the clever, colorful and ultimately optimistic video’s conception in a statement:

For the video, we wanted something evil, glossy, cynical, and camp. director Emily Yoshida came up with a concept that addresses our reliance on technology and apps that’s so absorbing, it’s hard to engage with the outside world, even when it is literally being consumed by slime (and, hello, global warming, melting ice, coral bleaching, impending heat death, make no mistake, it is being consumed by slime).

Soon after Speedy Ortiz assembled in Brooklyn in the fall of 2016 and recorded what they thought was their third album, Election Day happened, and the band knew they had to scrap what they had done, shifting their focus from the personal to the political. “The songs on the album that were strictly personal or lovey dovey just didn’t mean anything to me anymore that’s not the kind of music I’ve found healing or motivating in the past few years, and I was surprised I’d written so much of it,” Dupuis recalls. “Social politics and protest have been a part of our music from day one, and I didn’t want to stop doing that on this album.” Four months and many new songs later, the result was Twerp Verse, which a press release describes as a “urgent, taught and pointedly witty” album that’s “tuned smartly to the political opacity of the present.” The album’s consonant title, too, is a nod to the importance of speaking out: “I call it a ‘twerp verse’ when a musician guests on a track and says something totally outlandish—like a Lil Wayne verse—but it becomes the most crucial part,” Dupuis explains. “I like ‘twerp’ as a diss, but in this meaning, the twerp is doing a service—shaking things up by being bold, not complacent, never silent.”

Speedy Ortiz  The band, made up of Dupuis on guitars, vocals and synths, Darl Ferm on bass and Mike Falcone on drums, is now joined by supporting guitarist Andy Molholt (of psych-pop act Laser Background).

“Lucky 88” is the first single from Speedy Ortiz’s forthcoming album, “Twerp Verse,” out April 27th on Carpark Records.,

Slugger, is the debut LP from Sad13 a.k.a. Sadie Dupuis, prioritizes self-possession in every sense. Sadie, who fronts the dynamite grunge-pop band Speedy Ortiz, forewent her usual modes of collaboration on Slugger, writing and producing the record herself–“to exorcise my control-freaky demons,” she says.

After Sadie moved to Philadelphia in early 2016, Slugger quickly began to take shape: “I wrote and played and recorded almost all of it in the two weeks I was subletting a friend’s tiny bedroom,” she says. Fittingly, directness, self-determinism, and intimacy are the bedrocks of Slugger’s overall tone. Sadie maintains her dignified wit even in less-than-ideal entanglements, as on the album’s opening track, “<2,” styled to resemble the level of affection of which a heart is capable when it’s been twisted out of shape. “I’m in less than two with you,” sings Dupuis, her crystalline voice steadfastly delicate and assured, recalling self-proprietary forebears like Liz Phair and Fiona Apple.

Imitating the reflexive wordplay of Slugger’s lyrics, Sad13’s bedroom recordings are largely about bedroom-based themes. She chews on what it means to give and receive consent, sexual and romantic autonomy, finding new modes of enjoying love and boning after destructive partnerships, shredding joyously past misogyny and other exclusionary gender politics, and so many more exploratory, non-exploitative areas of love. Throughout Slugger, Sadie makes her motives and desires invitingly clear. As she sings on the song “The Sting,” “You don’t know how I’d like to say yes”—but she intends to tell you, and to be heard in kind.

Slugger–produced by Dupuis, mixed by Gabe Wax (Beirut, Wye Oak, Boots) and mastered by Emily Lazar (Sia, HAIM, Sky Ferreira)–is less rock-principled than Sadie’s other projects, but the talented guitarist makes intelligent work of her instrument throughout the record. The guitar lines are layered with synth melodies written on her laptop and are, occasionally, joined by live drums from Julian Fader (currently of Ava Luna; formerly bandmates with Sadie in Quilty).

This matches Sadie’s penchant for bright, tricky assonance and Wilde-style wit, her verses like sailors’ knots tying her instrumentation carefully in place. Her MFA in poetry from—and stint teaching writing at—UMass Amherst are apparent. This is also true of the rapper, producer, and PhD student Sammus’s guest appearance on the album’s final track, “Coming Into Powers,” where she raps, “I’m a star/ I’m a pulsar.” The song closes the loop on a thought ribboning around Slugger on the whole: As Dupuis sings, “I want a life where I can be who I like / Look at me, looking back at me, recognizing who I see.” Slugger identifies an artist and person who, throughout this record, is her own best company.

“Less Than 2” is taken from Sad13’s album “Slugger,” out November 11th, 2016.

speedy ortiz shervin lainez

Speedy Ortiz turned in the very good Foil Deer just last year, and that album’s recording sessions yielded some leftover material.  the Massachusetts quartet will release foiled again on june 3rd via Carpark Records, a four-track ep containing two new songs and two remixes of album track “puffer.”  today, Speedy Ortiz shared “Death Note,” a heavy track that pairs Sadie Dupuis’ whip-smart poetry with a crushing guitar riff.

“Death Note” is taken from Speedy Ortiz’s “Foiled Again” EP, out June 3rd.

http://

David Lynch fans are a very dedicated group, and the members of the indie rock band Speedy Ortiz are now among them. When it came time to make the video for “My Dead Girl,” the final video from their sophomore album, Foil Deer, band mates and film school alums Mike Falcone and Darl Fermwanted to create a crime story with an atmospheric feel. “More dreamy and noir than James Bond,” says Falcone. Director and cinematographer Elle Schneider—a veritable cinematic encyclopedia and co-inventor of the Digital Bolex—felt that Lynch’s Twin Peaks was both dreamy and creepy, and set out to fashion lead singer/songwriter Sadie Dupuis as a new version of Kyle MacLachlan’s Agent Cooper.

See the results, above, in this exclusive premiere of the “My Dead Girl.”

As Schneider explains, “Lynch’s masterful style, while often blanketly described as surreal, comes from a more idealistic viewpoint of willfully, almost forcefully, naive wonder about the world that isn’t often explored when his work is referenced or homaged.”

And although there are puppets in the video as well, Schneider explains that they were used as key characters in order to keep the tone intact and not for the sake of comedy. “They seemed like something that could feasibly appear in a dreamy state,” she says.

Dupuis – who’s lately been dressing herself for shows in skorts from American Two Shot – doubles as characters in Eraserhead, Mulholland Drive, Twin Peaks and Blue Velvet. And as the group readies for their next tour, where all proceeds will be going to the Girls Rock Camp Foundation, Dupuis explains that they simply wanted to remind people to be kind and charitable as 2015 comes to a close. “Do unto others as you would have rock bands do unto you, right?”

Foil Deer is for sale at iTunes and Carpark Records.

Speedy Ortiz
Sadie Dupuis: guitar, synths, vocals
Darl Ferm: bass, guitar
Michael Falcone: drums, piano, vocals
Devin McKnight: guitar

KEXP Live presents Speedy Ortiz performing live in the KEXP studio. Recorded May 27, 2015.

Songs:
The Graduates
Raising The Skate
Puffer
Ginger

Speedy Ortiz is an American indie rock band from Northampton, Massachusetts, United States. The band originated in 2011 as Sadie Dupuis solo project while she was teaching songwriting at a summer camp, recording her own material using her laptop. Two releases resulted from this solo endeavor, the Cop Kicker EP, and the album, The Death Of Speedy Ortiz.

The project expanded into a full band in late 2011. The group independently released “Taylor Swift” b/w “Swim Fan,” which was followed by 2012’s Sports, released on Exploding in Sound Records.

Their debut album, Major Arcana, was released on Carpark Records in 2013. The album was well received. Pitchfork Media deemed the album “Best New Music” In 2014, guitarist Matt Robidoux was replaced by fellow Massachusetts musician Devin McKnight of Grass is Green. On January 21, 2015, Dupuis announced their second studio album, “Foil Deer”, which was released on April 21, 2015.