Posts Tagged ‘Carpark Records’

The Beths are an Auckland quartet who pen stylish guitar pop with a keen lyrical bite. All four members studied jazz at University giving them the technical proficiency to contort simple pop structures and perfect, lush vocal harmonies. Check out a super rad performance by the Beths “Live at Lincoln Hall”. Recorded on March 6th, 2019 in Chicago, IL.

Tracklist:
1. Whatever
2. Happy Unhappy
3. Little Death

Band Members
Elizabeth Stokes – Vocals and Guitar
Jonathan Pearce – Guitar and Vocals
Benjamin Sinclair – Bass and Vocals
Ivan Luketina-Johnston – Drums and Vocals

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Cloud Nothings is a ferocious, melodious alternative rock band signed to Carpark Records. The aggressive quartet have been releasing stellar post-punk influenced offerings for a decade yet continue to push the boundaries of their immense guitar-focused sound. Watch this fresh performance by Cloud Nothings live at Brooklyn Boulders Climbing Gym in Chicago, IL. Far Out is an Audiotree series

Elizabeth Stokes named her band after herself, or, rather, her nickname. So it should come as no surprise, then, that the debut album from New Zealand-based rockers The Beths, Future Me Hates Me, is sharply self-aware. Stokes, a music teacher who quit her day job to tour the world with The Beths, pairs clever, refreshingly straightforward lyrics with uber-catchy guitar pop, and she never stutters in delivering even the most blunt assessments of her doubts, fears and anxieties. “Sometimes I think I’m doing fine / I think I’m pretty smart,” she sings on the album’s title track before, later, completing the thought: “Oh then the walls become thin / And somebody gets in / I’m defenseless.” On dizzying love song “Little Death,” she captures and tames all the butterflies swarming around in her stomach: “And the red spreads to my cheeks / You make me feel three glasses in.”

The Beths sound as if they’re already three albums in, playing with the musical and lyrical finesse of a much older and more experienced band. Every single song on this record arrives with as many contagious hooks and honest confessions as on the sparkly, frank “Little Death” and the toe-tap-inducing examination of overthinking “Future Me Hates Me.” Indie rock is alive and well in Oceania—The Beths, like their Australian neighbors Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, hit it out of the park in crafting one of the sturdiest rock debuts of the year.

“Little Death” is taken from The Beths‘ album, “Future Me Hates Me,” out now on Carpark Records.

A delightful pop collection full of power chords and sing-alongs about the confusion, angst, and pain as we fall in and out of love. Hard not to smile, even while you’re crying. The Beths have a way of giving luminescence and pep to even the most harrowing aspects of love and human relation; bright, bespoke chord progressions and glittering harmonies as the backdrop to self-destruction, the grief of loss, and the pain that can come with finding yourself with a crush. “Broke every window pane/so I can feel the cold rain/when I lie in bed catching death, trying to wash it all away…”

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The Beths performing live in the KEXP studio. Recorded October 2nd, 2018.

Our KEXP vid is up! Give it a look if you wanna see me:
– head bang my headphones off with a single bang🤘
– disintegrate into a nervous, mumbling mess💧
– be completely star struck by Cheryl

Songs: Future Me Hates Me Uptown Girl Little Death Happy Unhappy

Band Members
Elizabeth Stokes – Guitar and Vocals
Jonathan Pearce – Guitar and Vocals
Benjamin Sinclair – Bass and Vocals
Ivan Luketina-Johnston – Drums and Vocals

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Cloud Nothings have released “Leave Him Now,” the second single from their upcoming album Last Building Burning, out October 19th via Carpark Records. The track follows “The Echo of the World” and leans more toward the sunnier pop sound last year’s album release “Life Without Sound”, albeit with more angst and thrash. In the song, frontman Dylan Baldi begging a friend to leave an abusive relationship: “You gotta go right now/Or never at all.”

The band has also announced a fall North American tour starting in October;

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“Leave Him Now” is the latest song to be taken from the forthcoming Cloud Nothings album, Last Building Burning, which is due for release on the 19th October 2018 via Wichita Recordings and Carpark Records.

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We are elated to announce the return of Cloud Nothings. Their fifth full-length album, Last Building Burning, is due out October 19th on Carpark Records (US) and Wichita Recordings (UK/EU). The new album is a culmination of the development of frontman Dylan Baldi’s ever-changing sound, following up 2017’s Life Without Sound. It is an extension of the band’s live performances, capturing the frenetic energy that’s characteristic of their shows and infusing the jagged unpredictability of guitars.

Last Building Burning are available on the Carpark/Wichita shops “I’m obsessed with the idea of energy at the moment,” Baldi says about the making of Last Burning Building. “That’s how I thought of this record: seven short, and one long, bursts of intense, controlled chaos. I wanted to make songs that come across in a way that can actually be felt.”

“The Echo of the World” is taken from Cloud Nothings’ forthcoming album, “Last Building Burning,” due out October . Cleveland’s finest indie rock band Cloud Nothing are planning their return to the UK. Developed out of singer / song writer Dylan Baldi’s solo basement studio recording project, he leads a band that also includes drummer Jayson Gerycz, guitarist Chris Brown and TJ Duke on bass.

Baldi started out by recording at his parent’s basement in 2009 using GarageBand and releasing his material through various fake profiles on MySpace, all of which directed listeners back to his work. Amongst the fake bands, a profile under the name Cloud Nothings proved to be one of the most popular which received an invite for gigs in New York prompting Baldi to seek out real members.

Now an actual band, they began to rise in popularity and soon signed to independent label Bridgetown Records through which they released the eight track EP Turning On which features the single Hey Cool Kid. They released their eponymously titled debut album in 2011 which thrilled critics,  Their incredible back catalogue also includes the albums Attack On Memory plus Here And Nowhere Else .

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Everyone idealises having a crush until you actually get one, and realise that it’s actually pretty exhausting, agonising over what type of text to send and why they haven’t responded and whether it’s correct to be obsessing so much. “Happy Unhappy”, the wonderful new single from Auckland four-piece The Beths, pinpoints this exact feeling of frustration perfectly.

“You’re in my brain taking up space I need for delivering lies and suppressing the sighs”, sings lead singer/guitarist Elizabeth Stokes on the song’s wonderfully acerbic pre-chorus, before pivoting to something altogether much sweeter: “and for navigating escape when I get lost in your eyes, it’s taking up all of my time”. The track deals with this frustrating duality perfectly; it’s nice to care about someone, but it’s a real pain too.

“Happy Unhappy” is another winner from The Beths, after 2016’s excellent EP Warm Blood, and the equally great singles “Great No One” and “Future Me Hates Me”. “Happy Unhappy” is taken from The Beths’ debut album Future Me Hates Me, which is out on August 10th on Carpark Records, and features both “Great No One” and “Future Me Hates Me”. It’s gonna be a good one.

The Beths occupy a warm, energetic sonic space between joyful hooks, sun-soaked harmonies, and acerbic lyrics. Their debut album Future Me Hates Me, forthcoming on Carpark Records, delivers an astonishment of roadtrip-ready pleasures, each song hitting your ears with an exhilarating endorphin rush like the first time you heard Slanted and Enchanted or “Cannonball.”

Front and center on these ten infectious tracks is lead singer and primary songwriter Elizabeth Stokes. Stokes has previously worked in other genres within Auckland’s rich and varied music scene, recently playing in a folk outfit, but it was in exploring the angst-ridden sounds of her youth that she found her place. “Fronting this kind of band was a new experience for me,” says Stokes. “I never thought I had the right voice for it.”

From the irresistible title track to future singles “Happy Unhappy” and “You Wouldn’t Like Me,” Stokes commands a vocal range that spans from the brash confidence of Joan Jett to the disarming vulnerability of Jenny Lewis. Further honeying Future Me Hates Me’s dark lyrics that explore complex topics like being newly alone and the self-defeating anticipation of impending regret, ecstatic vocal harmonies bubble up like in the greatest pop and R+B of the ‘60s, while inverting the trope of the “sad dude singer accompanied by a homogenous girl-sound.”

All four members of The Beths studied jazz at university, resulting in a toolkit of deft instrumental chops and tricked-out arrangements that operate on a level rarely found in guitar-pop. Beths guitarist and studio guru Jonathan Pearce (whose other acts as producer include recent Captured Tracks signing Wax Chattels) brings it all home with an approach that’s equal parts seasoned perfectionist and D.I.Y.

“There’s a lot of sad sincerity in the lyrics,” she continues, “that relies on the music having a light heart and sense of humor to keep it from being too earnest.” Channeling their stew of personal-canon heroes while drawing inspiration from contemporaries like Alvvays and Courtney Barnett, The Beths serve up deeply emotional lyrics packaged within heavenly sounds that delight in probing the limits of the pop form. “That’s another New Zealand thing,” Stokes concludes with a laugh. “We’re putting our hearts on our sleeves—and then apologizing for it.” The result is nothing less than one of the standout records of 2018.

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“Happy Unhappy” is taken from The Beths‘ forthcoming album, “Future Me Hates Me.”

 

Speedy Ortiz, Twerp Verse

The run up to Twerp Verse, the third record from Speedy Ortiz, has intoduced three vibrant music videos. Each one taps into the sardonic wit and playful imagination of its singer, guitarist and lyrical mastermind of Sadie Dupuis, but the video for “Villain” (directed in a crayon box array of retro colors by Elle Schneider) is especially powerful at distilling her message to something tangible. Recreating the campy feel of a monster flick, Dupuis is relentlessly provoked by a fish-headed creature, a surreal embodiment of invasive verbal abuse and physical harassment that women endure daily. “‘I wanna know what kind of games you like,'” she recounts, before recoiling at these unwanted advances: “He talks like he knows me, so I’m being polite.” Later, she sings “‘I wanna know if a no means alright.’ / He looks past my answer, did he earn the right? No way.” — a dark inverse to her consent-positive mantra in “Get A Yes,” a fizzy gem from Dupuis‘ solo project Sad13.

While the concepts at play in “Villain” are familiar territory Dupuis and Speedy Ortiz have covered in the past, she’s never been quite this direct. Surprisingly, these themes weren’t initially the album’s intended direction. As the story goes, the band was primed to record in late 2016, but soon decided that batch of songs were “strictly personal or lovey-dovey” and no longer felt relevant amid the cultural and political shifts occurring post election. “Social politics and protest have been a part of our music from day one, and I didn’t want to stop doing that on this album,” Dupuis stated in the album’s press release. The band shelved those efforts mid-stream and doubled-down to write new material that better reflected these turbulent, unprecedented times. The result, Twerp Verse, shows Speedy Ortiz at its most pointed and fearless.

With a Master’s degree in poetry and a reputation for skillful, hilarious wordplay, Dupuis is among rock’s more compelling songwriters. Across Twerp Verse’s 11 tracks, she rapidly slings pop culture and literary references and shrouds her narratives in cryptic, visceral phrases worthy of decoding. And it gives license to speak hard truths and reveal personal anxieties — be it falling back into the familiar comforts of bad relationships (“Backslidin'”) or mining contradictory feelings on love and commitment (“Moving In”). “Lucky 88” critiques the head-in-the-sand apathy and disillusionment of people watching the world crumble around them. “One more time with reeling / You siphoned out the feeling / Can’t you act responsibly? / You’re the sick pup who created me,” she sings, before repeating “I don’t care anymore…” with weary resignation. But Dupuis is best when wielding humor and sarcasm — and taking no prisoners. “You Hate The Title” is a withering rebuke of haters publicly nitpicking someone’s opinions and creative endeavors, while still “singing along.” “You hate the title but you’re digging the song / You like it in theory, but it’s rubbing you wrong,” she seethes atop fluttering keyboards that belie her fed-up side-eye. “I can’t, I can’t, with your ‘Just can’t even’s.”

Recorded at Silent Barn in Brooklyn with Carlos Hernandez and Julian Fader (Ava Luna) and produced and mixed by Mike Mogis (Bright Eyes) at his studio in Omaha, Twerp Verse is both musically expansive and Dupuis’ most accessible work yet, a blend of catchy pop hooks and dexterous guitar playing. “Buck Me Off” opens with that signature Speedy Ortiz formula, and the band — comprised of bassist Darl Ferm, drummer Mike Falcone, and guitarist Andy Molholt — outright shreds with overdriven chords and buzzy solos piercing through murky distortion. Similarly “Sport Death” unfurls razor-sharp riffs that mimic the vocal melodies, and builds tension through off-kilter chord progressions and half-step dissonance. Elsewhere, they fold in pitch-shifted tones, pulsing synths, and laptop beats (“Lucky 88”) and skin-crawling atmosphere (“I’m Blessed”) — something first hinted at on 2015’s Foil Deer, and honed further on Sad13’s 2016 record, Slugger — and invigorates what can be tricky subject matter with immediate uplift and noisy catharsis.

That’s emblematic of “Alone With Girls” and “I’m Blessed,” in which Speedy Ortiz both alludes to emotional bullying and violence in past toxic relationships, and uses its platform to amplify the voices and stories too often silenced or marginalized. ” Lean In When I Suffer,” the album’s anthem, refutes self-branded feminist allies who only appear supportive when they don’t have to address their own privilege or problematic behavior. She’s having none of that, quipping “I’m checking my phone / He’s unworthy of talk / If he really wants to be the one, he’d forfeit shotgun for once…” It’s in these moments, Speedy Ortiz’s songs become about reclaiming agency, and finding empowerment through empathy. In that way, Twerp Verse is an album arriving right on time.

thanks to Npr

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“Lean In When I Suffer” is about that fun breed of “ally” who wears out their already exhausted friends by relying on us for excessive emotional labor. They want props for their wokeness, but don’t want to put in any actual work or divest themselves of power. They just take up space, and shut down when you try to talk them through their problematic tendencies. Because #selfcare? So you’re stuck in a toxic vampiric loop trying to maintain a relationship–Lean In And Suffer, why don’t you!

Director Ari Ratner gives the clip a hyperactive cut-and-paste PBS vibe, with lots of clowning and fun costumes, like the one worn by Speedy Ortiz bandleader Sadie Dupuis. The throes of her depression send her to a place with people promising relief, and delivering even worse feelings.

Director Ari Ratner took this concept a step further to address another annoyance we found relatable as hell, which is when “people give unsolicited advice about how to beat depression. [They] typically fail to acknowledge depression as a real illness and often minimize the experiences of the person they are trying to help.” So our OK-to-Cry-Corral band gets put through happiness bootcamp from a group of clowns who’ve “never been sad” (and some accompanying Crayola-bright illustrations from Julia Emiliani).

Ultimately, playing angry rock songs is our favorite form of therapy

“Lean In When I Suffer” is the second single from Speedy Ortiz’s forthcoming album, “Twerp Verse,” out April 27th on Carpark Records.