Posts Tagged ‘Solitaire Recordings’

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This Toronto band’s label debut is an exquisitely passionate work of vintage folk rock that exudes a tingling, calming warmth throughout. based out of Toronto, Little Kid’s Kenny Boothby finds himself inspired by this idea of transfiguration – a complete change of form or appearance into a more beautiful or spiritual state. far-ranging in both its sonic palette and its subject matter, this is a record of unusual depth and clarity from a songwriter who has spent the better part of a decade honing his craft and a lifetime building the perspective his songs so deftly express. these are personal songs that look outward, that seek to tie together the bigness of the world and the smallness of the everyday with both subtlety and humility. this is a must for fans of the band, trace mountains and early wilco.
“one of the best, but highly underrated, Toronto-based acts of the last few years”
humbling, and quietly brilliant  An arranging and writing master of contemplative pop returns to mull and muse on religion. Everything Ken puts out is amazing. It’s so hard to pick a favourite track but this is one of the highlights for me. Little Kid’s sound has grown in all the right ways. They perfectly straddle the line of comforting/intimate lofi and rhythmic indie-rock. The whiplash-like transition from ‘Think It Over’ to ‘Missionary’ is like a breath of fresh air every time, and there are lots of these gems within the album,  just an amazing, beautiful, haunting album. loved this band since they released logic songs. they hold such a special place in my heart!

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Little Kid is:
Kenny Boothby – vocals, classical guitar, casio sk-1, casiotone mt-40, piano, tapes, clarinet, banjo, kazoo
Broderick Germain – drums, percussion, casio mt-40, casio sk-1
Paul Vroom – bass, vocals

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Folk musician Brigitte Naggar released her latest album as Common Holly last year with “When I Say To You Black Lightning”. Her experimental folk songs are meticulously crafted—occasionally sinister and other times, pretty and nurturing, but always moving. Her character-driven song writing makes her a uniquely arresting lyricist, and no matter the unexpected detours her songs take, she always finds a way to reel you in. Although Common Holly’s sophomore album, When I say to you Black Lightning, is engaging from its very opening notes, its thesis statement doesn’t arrive until four songs in: “I think we’ve been measured out for pain since birth,” Brigitte Naggar sings on the woodwind-flanked folk rumination “Measured.” The album, a thrilling experiment in shattering the boundaries between folk, rock and occasionally punk, examines the human capacity to receive, cope with and deliver trauma. A huge leap from Naggar’s 2017 debut, Playing House, Black Lightning is rife with minimally detailed yet fully rendered character sketches, and Naggar’s deftness at seamlessly weaving dissonant guitar lines into her riveting stories elevates her music well above much of the crowded folk-adjacent field.

“When I Say To You Black Lightning” out October 18th.

If your PR piece touts Sharon Van Etten and Bob Boilen as big fans, there’s a good chance I’ll (eventually) open that email. And I’m glad I finally got around to Kate Davis. In a nutshell, this is wonderfully executed mid-tempo indie sung by someone with a lovely voice. “Trophy” is out on 11/8 on Solitaire Recordings. Here’s some more info on Kate.

Kate Davis’ story is one of elegant artistic evolution. Having grown up in the spotlight as a jazz prodigy, she performed in the Grammy Jazz Ensemble, won ASCAP’s Robert Allen Award, played slots at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center, and collected fervent endorsements from Herbie Hancock, Ben Folds, Alison Krauss and Jeff Goldblum among others. But — Kate outgrew her accolades. Days spent practicing and performing standards became nights spent writing — cathartic indie rock. Forbidden chord progressions emerged like diary entries, documents of an internal reaction to routine. Time intended for technique slipped into secret listening sessions of Beach House, Elliot Smith and TV On The Radio.

In the same bright, arresting croon that ignited her youthful stardom, Davis created confessionals. Now 28 and audibly matured, Kate is prepared to properly share the artifacts from her late night craft, a full length reaction to ritual required of perfection, an outburst from the pedestal. Throughout twelve tumultuous tracks, she poetically reflects upon the intricacies of what it is to live, ruminating on topics too close to her heart — identity, self-worth, loss.

SXSW Music Day 4 Highlights: Common Holly, Soccer Mommy, Ought, Porches

The Montreal band led by Brigitte Naggar is as bewitching live as they are on record. Naggar is flanked by a cello player and drummer, and her delivery is dauntless. The songs off her debut album, Playing House are flat out beautiful. Naggar is snarky yet charming at every turn and we’re excited for what comes next for her group, which they signed with Toronto’s Seal Mountain Records this week.

Montreal’s Common Holly is a new indie rock act that combined jagged guitars with smooth welcoming vocals to build a charming debut on her record Playing House in October of 2017. The release got a good bit of love from some cool media outlets, and was released digitally by Solitaire Recordings, but somehow I only discovered it recently, but entranced by a single listen.

But I’m not the only one who has been noticing. Common Holly have now announced that they’re signed to Seal Mountain Records, who released our Oso Oso’s yunahon mixtape last year. Seal Mountain will be pressing the record to vinyl for the first time.