Posts Tagged ‘Robert Forster’

We are happy to finally announce the upcoming release of the second installment of the Go-Betweens anthology series, which will be released worldwide on December 6th.

“G Stands For Go-Betweens Volume 2” extensively documents the band’s creative output in the latter half of the Eighties in an ambitious box containing five vinyl LPs, five compact discs and an extensive 112-page book, featuring a trove of archival photos and extensive historical liner notes from founding member Robert Forster, along with additional pieces from guest essayists, fans and contemporaries.

The box set captures the band’s output from 1985 through 1989 and includes the first vinyl re-pressings of the three mid-period studio albums in over thirty years (“Liberty Belle And The Black Diamond Express,” “Tallulah” & “16 Lovers Lane”), all re-mastered from the original analogue tapes. “G Stands For Go-Betweens Volume 2” also includes an eighteen-song double LP of the band performing live at London’s legendary Town & Country Club on May 10th, 1987. Additionally, the set comes with five compact discs of their b-sides, radio sessions & rare, hard-to-find and unreleased demos.

out December 6th via Domino Recording Co.,

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Inferno is acclaimed Australian singer-songwriter Robert Forster’s first solo album in four years – his second album over the last eleven years. Forster only makes records when he feels he has the songs – on Inferno, he has nine he totally believes in. They range from the exhilarating top ten pop of Inferno (Brisbane In Summer), the beach shack groove of Life Has Turned A Page, via ‘Remain’s 1977 New York strut, to finish in a way that this concise, brilliant, drama and wit filled album only can – on the big build epic One Bird In The Sky. Inferno was made in Berlin in 2018, during the hottest German summer in decades. Noted producer / engineer Victor Van Vugt (Beth Orton Trailer Park, P J Harvey Stories From The City, Stories From The Sea), recorded the album; the first time he and Forster had worked together since Van Vugt engineered Forster’s debut solo album classic Danger In The Past in Berlin in 1990. Inferno in its making is a perfect mix of the familiar and the new.

The Go-Betweens co-founder Robert Forster has just released his terrific new solo album, this closing song seems to double as a philosophy for life: “Eat only what I eat, breathe only what I breathe, well that’s me.” And as his “da da das” and violin fade out, you can almost imagine the credits rolling. May we all achieve such grace.

Also working with Forster again, are Brisbane based multi-instrumentalists Scott Bromley and Karin Bãumler from Songs To Play(2015), while new recruits are drummer Earl Havin (Tindersticks, Mary J. Blige) and keyboardist Michael Muhlhaus (Blumfeld, Kante). Four musicians from the corners of the world, who, with Van Vugt’s bold and beautiful production, sound like a band of the ages. In front of them, Forster delivers the best vocal performances of his career.

Geniuses will always be geniuses ….. And I could not define in another word what happened in Brisbane, Australia in the distant past of 1977 ….

The reunion of Robert Forster and Grant McLennan generated one of the most beautiful bands that the universe has given us, the name, well everyone knows, or should know, The Go-Betweens.
This project is our small tribute to the magnificent work that these magicians created. My special thanks to all the bands that are part of this project.

And, briefly, the main feeling everyone wants with this project is that…. “Loves Goes On”...anyway.

In memory of the eternal Grant William McLennan.

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It has been announced that three members of beloved Brisbane band The Go-Betweens will reunite for the first time since 1989 to take part in an epic tribute concert for their acclaimed sixth studio album, “16 Lovers Lane”.

Lindy MorrisonAmanda Brown and John Willsteed will pay homage to the 1988 album on which all three played along with co-founders Robert Forster and the late Grant McLennan  — the last Go-Betweens record of the ‘classic’ era — with assistance from Dan KellyDanny Widdicombe and Luke Daniel Peacock rounding out the core line-up of the band.

That already-acclaimed ensemble will be joined by a range of incredible other Australian musicians including The Church’s Steve Kilbey, GANGajang’s Mark Callaghan and Died Pretty’s Ron Peno, as well as festival artistic director Katie Noonan and her brother, Tyrone (both also known for their work with george), plus MontaigneSam Cromack and Jen Boyce (Ball Park Music), Tim Nelson and Zoe Davis (Cub Sport), Sahara Beck and Kirin J Callinan.

“We will be recreating that amazing album on its 30th anniversary … it’s going to be amazing,” Noonan said . “And Lindy, Amanda and John haven’t played together since Berlin in 1989, I think … so that’s super-special.

“You know, Grant was one of my heroes as a musician, but just as a human being — he was the sweetest man — and I thought, well, you know, it was only the 10-year anniversary of his passing, I think, the year before last [Ed: it was 2016], so, you know, he just influenced and inspired so many musicians in Brisbane, Queensland, and around the world; they were such an example of, ‘Wow, you can be from, y’know, St Lucia and have an international career as a musician’.

“Them and The Saints paved the way for so many other artists, so it’ll be beautiful to celebrate Grant’s and Robert’s incredible songwriting and songbook.”

Robert Forster.

Look at the liner notes to any record by The Go-Betweens, and every song is co-credited “R. Forster/G. McLennan.” Perhaps it was out of mutual respect, perhaps it was out of creative solidarity, but as with “Lennon/McCartney,” fans of the Australian rock band could always tell who wrote what song; Grant McLennan and Robert Forster‘s distinct songwriting, vocal and guitar personalities were always on full display. The former’s songs were lush and sensitive, the latter’s concise and politely biting, but as superfan Carrie Brownstein noted, “Before The Go-Betweens, I never thought that delicacy could wield sharp knives.”

When Forster released The Evangelist in 2008, his longtime bandmate had died two years earlier. There was a quiet sadness to that lovely record, one that not only meditated on his Go-Betweens cohort but also paid tribute with some of his unused lyrics and melodies. It’s been seven years since then, and Forster has been no less busy producing records, making a compelling go of it as a music journalist and critic , and orchestrating the first volume of G Is For Go-Betweens, an anthology set exhaustive in its demos, archival material and Forster’s own recollections spanning a fruitful period from 1978 to 1984.

Sounding energized by his younger band, which features members of The John Steel Singers, Songs To Play is Forster’s most diverse and playful solo record. At times, it’s also the most Go-Betweens-y record Forster’s ever made under his own name. In the opening track, “Learn To Burn,” a mid-tempo, hip-swaying strut and a crisp guitar riff help mark it as a sort of throwback to those first singles from the late ’70s, when Forster unapologetically worshiped The Velvet Underground and was still figuring out how to get a song from A to B. But as much as “Learn To Burn” keeps a clean-cut rhythm going, Karin Baumler (Forster’s longtime musical and life partner) draws out the melody on violin, giving the instrumental break a through-line before a cheeky, Chuck berry duck-walking, style solo. After seven years away, Robert Forster’s still got that mile-wide grin, assured by his opening line: “Time’s a signal and you wait for changes / The problem is you know I got no patience.”

 

Songs To Play comes out Sept. 18 on Tapete.

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A 4cd or 4LP Anthology with original with rare and archival recordings and extensive liner notes from Robert Forster, Domino Records are honoured to announce the upcoming Autumn 2014 release of an extraordinary anthology for one of the most beloved and influential Australian groups of all-time, The Go-Betweens.

G Stands For Go-Betweens Volume One extensively documents the band’s origins in an ambitious box containing four vinyl albums, four compact discs and an extensive 112-page book, featuring a trove of archival photos and extensive historical liner notes from founding member Robert Forster, along with additional pieces from guest essayists, fans and contemporaries. The box set captures the band’s output from 1978 through 1984 and includes the first vinyl re-pressings of their first three studio albums in over thirty years (Send Me A Lullaby, Before Hollywood & Spring HillFair), all re-mastered from the original analog tapes. G Stands For Go-Betweens also brings together their early classic and collectible singles together on a fourth vinyl LP entitled The First Five Singles, featuring new artwork from its creators. Additionally, the set comes with four compact discs of rare, hard-to-find and unreleased demos, recordings, radio sessions and a complete live concert radio broadcast from 1982. If that’s not enough, the set comes with a silkscreen of their first promotional poster for their debut single, “Lee Remick”, as well as a reproduction of their very first press release from their own Able Label.

http://www.dominorecordsco/gobetweens/

The first three albums, the first five singles, outtakes, demos, radio sessions and a live show…

In the 1980s, Australia’s Go-Betweens were the dark horse among all those sharp-edged, sweet-and-sour guitar bands with literary pretensions. For those who found the cult of Morrissey too messianic and Lloyd Cole too self-satisfied, here was a connoisseurs’ choice: a band who name-checked Jean Genet while blending Sixties pop nous, 80s indie elegance, the brittle intensity of post-punk and the wayward non-conformity of The Modern Lovers.

A vehicle for the songs and voices of Robert Forster and Grant McLennan, the Go-Betweens formed in December 1977 in Brisbane and ended their first act in 1989. Six years into a fruitful post-Millennial reunion, they finally ceased trading in 2006 following McLennan’s sudden death from a heart attack. Forster has been plotting this gargantuan eight-disc slab of cultural excavation since shortly after that unhappy event; the first of three planned anthologies, it’s a beautifully conceived exploration of the band’s origins and early evolution.

Included are the first three Go-Betweens albums, Send Me A Lullaby (1982), Before Hollywood (1983), and Spring Hill Fair (1984), as well as all ten sides of their first five 45s, collected here on a new stand-alone LP titled The First Five Singles. Running parallel to these four vinyl albums are four CDs, arranged chronologically, consisting of outtakes, hard-to-find and unreleased demos, radio sessions and a complete (and excellent) live concert, recorded at the Mosman Hotel, Sydney, on April 23rd, 1982. There are over 100 tracks in all.

Meeting as fellow arts students at the University of Queensland, Forster and McLennan named their band after L.P. Hartley’s 1953 novel, and throughout its lifespan the group’s music was characterised by a darting intellectual curiosity. Debut single “Lee Remick” is a faux-naif piece of fan mail directed at the actress (“She was in The Omen / with Gregory Peck / She got killed / what the heck”), but its dumbness is studied and self-aware; on the B-side, “Karen”, a song clearly in thrall to Patti Smith’s “Gloria”, they’re already name-checking Brecht, Joyce and Chandler.

By 1980, and third single “I Need Two Heads”, the music had started to catch up with the words. Released on Postcard Records following trips to London and Glasgow, the song is an assured blend of The Cure and The Gang Of Four, giving the Go-Betweens their first Top 10 indie hit in the UK. Orange Juice drummer Steven Daly guested on the track, but by the time they started recording Send Me A Lullaby Lindy Morrison had joined on drums. As a settled three piece, the Go-Betweens’ house sound began to emerge: brittle and sharp, with lots of air between Forster’s guitar, McLennan’s bass and Morrison’s idiosyncratic rhythm. “Careless” has the compulsive twitch of early Orange Juice, and the urgent jangle of “Hold Your Horses” has shades of REM’s Chronic Town, but any sweetness is balanced by a sour twist. The vivid psycho-sexual drama of “Eight Pictures” creeps and crawls, the waspish digs at some thespian love-rival (“Same publicity shots for six years”) barely lightening the mood, while “It Could Be Anyone” recalls the neurotic funk of Talking Heads.

Released the following year, Before Hollywood marks a leap forward in both composition and execution, excising any lingering hints of ramshackle amateurishness. Robert Vickers joined as bassist, McLennan moved to guitar, and piano became a more prominent texture, notably on the lovely “Dusty In Here”. The album includes the masterful “Cattle And Cane”, a taut, minimal, bittersweet reflection on McLennan’s Cairns childhood, written on Nick Cave’s guitar. A slightly reconfigured version of the song features on the fourth CD of rarities.

On Spring Hill Fair, the Go-Betweens’ sound shuffles towards something lusher, more pop-savvy. A serrated edge remains on “Five Words” and the lowering “River Of Money”, but by now the band were lining up against the great song stylists of the mid-80s. Washed with synthesisers, “Bachelor Kisses” is animated by the same restrained romanticism as Prefab Sprout’s “When Love Breaks Down” (if anything, the demo is even more swoonsome), while “Part Company” – from its quivering emotional urgency down to its intricate, concentric weave of bass, vocal and fluid guitar lines – is a kissing cousin to The Smiths’ “Reel Around The Fountain”.

Parts of Spring Hill Fair point towards the glossier, more measured elegance of the Go-Betweens next phase, bookended by 1986’s Liberty Belle And The Black Diamond Express and 1988’s 16 Lovers Lane. But that’s another story, for another anthology. For now, Volume One of G Stands For Go-Betweens is a giddy treat, marking the spot where the headlong rush of new beginnings meets the steadying hand of accomplishment.