Posts Tagged ‘Lucy Dacus’

See the source image

This last year, indie rockers Lucy Dacus, Julien Baker and Phoebe Bridgers all released acclaimed solo albums. The three Singer Songwriters guitarist-vocalists were booked on a North American tour together, with Baker and Bridgers co-headlining and Dacus opening. But that wasn’t enough: They also quickly formed a supergroup, and gave it a tongue-in-cheek name that nods to how women are rarely called geniuses with the frequency the way their male peers are. After the trio released its self-titled EP, on which they take turns in the frontwoman role and elsewhere blend their voices and instruments together in perfect bliss. The EP’s uniting thread, though, will surely be the clear-cut lyricism they all have in common, which packs a witty punch line after line. Some might even call it genius.

The debut from rock supergroup boygenius has only one real flaw: it’s much too short. Its length (still on the longer side for an EP, at six songs) is forgivable, though: The women behind boygeniusPhoebe Bridgers, Julien Baker and Lucy Dacus—are busy artists. They’ve each released a critically-adored solo LP in the last year or so and have thusly been swamped with promotional duties and live performances. So although these ladies aren’t technically “new artists,” their supergroup is new, and music is better for it. On boygenius, the three become one, miraculously and pristinely so. Bridgers, Baker and Dacus pack a novel’s worth of narrative and as many masterful melodies (not to mention harmonies) into just 21 minutes that will leave you feeling as if you’ve had the wind knocked right out of you.

The album ends on an especially magical note. On “Ketchum, ID,” Bridgers, Dacus and Baker assume soprano, alto and tenor and churn up a harmony so handsomely melancholic you’ll find yourself snatching tissues without even knowing why. It’s a fitting epilogue, too, that chronicles the band’s shared experience as touring musicians, and the emotional heaviness following those long nights in unfamiliar places. “I am never anywhere / Anywhere I go,” they sing in unison. “When I’m home I’m never there / Long enough to know.” Those are devastating words, but, at the same time, you get the feeling Bridgers, Baker and Dacus have found some sense of home in one another.

boygenius performed songs off their first EP live at Brooklyn Steel for Pitchfork Live

Setlist: 0:50 Souvenir 5:10 Bite the Hand 8:50 Stay Down 13:35 Me & My Dog 17:50 Salt in the Wound 23:35 Ketchum, ID

Their mutual experiences are what unite them, and that bond bleeds through this music in every buzzing, beautiful bar.

For much of 2020, Bandcamp has hosted the wonderful Bandcamp Friday initiative, which involved them waiving their share of the income they usually receive from sales on their platform on some Fridays, so artists ultimately come away from the transaction with more money. The endeavor has been a great success, but it looks like it’s coming to an end. In a recent post, Bandcamp noted they will “continue to hold Bandcamp Fridays on the first Friday of every month until the end of the year.” They haven’t publicly committed to continuing Bandcamp Fridays in 2021, so today’s, the last one of the year, is the final one that’s officially scheduled.

The silver lining is that Lucy Dacus is helping to send Bandcamp Fridays off (potentially) with a bang: Today, she shared a cover of Hinder’s 2006 classic “Lips Of An Angel.” Dacus’ rendition of the track, which she says she recorded “a few months ago,” eschews the raspy, post-grunge edge of the original version and turns it into more tranquil folk a la Dacus.

proceeds going to The Okra Project (www.theokraproject.com) art by Carson McNamara

http://

Released December 5th, 2020

 

Image may contain: 1 person, closeup

Soon, Paramore leader Hayley Williams will let her first-ever solo album Petals For Armor. She has already shared a whopping five tracks from the LP. Today, she shares a sixth, and it’s easily the most anticipated song on the album.Baker, Bridgers, and Dacus all sing on “Roses/Lotus/Violet/Iris,” the new single that Williams has shared today. It’s the first time we’ve heard all three members of boygenius together since they finished touring behind their truly great 2018 EP. But this isn’t a boygenius song with Williams on it; it’s the opposite. “Roses/Lotus/Violet/Iris” is a skittering, personal pop song, and it sounds a whole lot like the other solo songs that Williams has released. Like most of those songs, it’s really good, too. It carries serious 1996 modern-rock-radio vibes. And those harmonies really are something.

Williams co-wrote “Roses/Lotus/Violet/Iris” with her Paramore bandmate Taylor York, who produced Petals For Armor, and with pop songwriter and producer Daniel James. It has some seriously busy strings, and the bridge goes hard.

Hayley Williams has shared a new solo single with boygenius, “Roses/Lotus/Violet/Iris,” taken from her forthcoming album Petals for Armor, out on May 8th via Atlantic Records. “Roses/Lotus/Violet/Iris” is a floral-themed, sultry tune with background vocals from boygenius—the beloved indie supergroup of Phoebe Bridgers, Lucy Dacus and Julien Baker. The string arrangements and subtle guitar lines give it a distinctly yearning quality and an underlying sadness.

Image may contain: 3 people

KEXP finally unveiled boygenius‘ 2018 performance this spring, and with it came the proper recording their radio- and tour-only rendition of “Cowboy Take Me Away.” Julien Baker, Phoebe Bridgers and Lucy Dacus’ tribute to fellow trifecta Dixie Chicks is full of a melancholy yearning that makes it feel like a spiritual companion to boygenius closer “Ketchum, ID.” Trading verses about longing to be held under the stars and to stand alone under sublime skyscraper-free skies, the trio share the same conflicting desires that made them want to “dissolve the band” and “move to Idaho”: to find solitude and to find belonging, for stability and for freedom. With twinkly mandolin and violin from frequent Baker collaborator Camille Faulkner, boygenius’ “Cowboy Take Me Away” is rustic and wistful, but with an overarching sweetness, purity and even delight.

From Baker’s first infectious, irrepressible grin to the giggles the moment the song ends, it seems the peace the three are searching for isn’t so far out of reach. Baker, Bridgers and Dacus are each formidable forces as cover artists in their own right, as this list attests. Together, they sound completely free—and completely at home.

Image result for records vinyl images"

what a wet week we have had, there’s a good deal of lovely records this week to soothe the aches and (possibly?) time to dry the socks..

The Nick Cave album Ghosteen that everyone has been asking about is OUT! today, It sees Nick and band in fine form, but there’s no mistaking there is a measure of catharsis in both the words and overall tone, understandably. It’s a wonderful piece of work though, despite the sombre atmosphere and flows with Cave’s singular ability to craft a narrative. I am very excited for the deluxe CD reissue of Gene Clark’s opus ‘No Other’ with a lovely booklet inside and an extra CD of rarities and alternate versions, and I was particularly psyched for the wonderful new LP from fave Ryley Walker and superb jazz drummer Charles Rumback. If you liked Grails (or Holy Sons for that matter), then this is a great one for you. Psych folk guitar with hints of Americana and a languid acid jazz backline, Ghosteen

Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds – Ghosteen

Ghosteen is the new two part album from Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds. Ghosteen is the seventeenth studio album from Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds, following 2016’s Skeleton TreeThe album was recorded in 2018 and early 2019 at Woodshed in Malibu, Nightbird in Los Angeles, Retreat in Brighton and Candybomber in Berlin. It was mixed by Nick Cave, Warren Ellis, Lance Powell and Andrew Dominik at Conway in Los Angeles.

Ghosteen sees Cave restrained and introspective, half singing, half speaking over a mix of piano and slow drifting electronics. He sounds vulnerable but not beaten. There are a lot of mentions of love in the lyrics, soft supportive backing vocals and an attractive warmth to the way Galleon Ship’s high synth sounds open the song wide, or the surprise falsetto he acquires late on in Sun Forest.

It’s a double LP with one album of conventional length songs then on the second – one short song and two of 12 and 14 minutes. They are more complex and grand. There’s a lot to take in but it’s totally absorbing.

2019

Lucy Dacus – 2019

Recorded in here-and-there studio spurts over the last two years, 2019 is made up of originals and cover songs tied to specific holidays, each of which has dropped / will drop around their respective date: Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day (and Taurus season!), Independence Day, Springsteen’s Birthday (not an official holiday, though we’re told Chris Christie often took that day off), Halloween, Christmas, and New Year.

Dacus uses her gift as a songwriter to help understand and cope with the world around her, including making sense of national holidays, often more geared towards social media boasts and manufactured consumerism than authentic celebration. “What is going on,” she asks herself on these days, retreating from the heightened expectations of holidays to figure out what to make of them and to find her own meaning. “I’ve collected some songs from trying to answer that question,” she says, and “this EP seems like the right place to put them next to each other. These songs are self-contained, not indicative of a new direction, just a willingness to do something different and sometimes even out of character.”

Pondsessions3000x3000

Pond – Sessions Live

There are very few of this live album from one of our favourite current bands Sessions is the first ever live album from Australian adventurers Pond. Featuring recent singles Paint Me Silver, Sweep Me Off My Feet and Daisy from both their last two albums, Tasmania and The Weather, as well live versions spanning their whole career, including fan favourite Don’t Look At The Sun (Otherwise You Will Go Blind) from their hard-to-find debut album Psychedelic Mango. This release has been two years in-the-making and underlines their reputation as one of the most exciting live acts around.

“We wanted to capture how the band has been playing live lately and commit that to tape while we were in the middle of a long tour,” reveals Pond’s Jay Watson. “As you play the same song for years, or even as a single tour rolls on, the way you play the songs mutates. Little inflections and fills become part of the song, and the structures and even the overall feeling and intent of the songs change. I always loved listening to my favourite bands’ Peel Sessions and wanted something of our own in that vein.”

Unknown 1

Josienne Clarke – In All Weather

In All Weather is a new collection of songs, in which Josienne Clarke goes it alone; musically, as this is her first solo record, and in her own life, laid bare and played out in the leave-it-all-behind-and-start-anew nature of the lyrics. The songs were written in on the Isle of Bute in 2018, where Josienne relocated for a year, overlooked by a snowy Ben Nevis.

Josienne accompanies herself on pared-back acoustic and electric guitar throughout. She’s joined on the record by experimental piano prodigy Elliott Galvin, innovative jazz drummer Dave Hamblett, celebrated Scottish harpist Mary Ann Kennedy and guitarist / bassist Sonny Johns who co-produced the record with Josienne.

Open uri20191009 22116 nmj9gd?1570623478

White Denim – Last Day Of Summer

White Denim, dubbed the “last great rock n’ roll band” by The Guardian, has launched Radio Milk Records with a remastered reissue of their 2010 fan-favourite Last Day of Summer. Once impossible to find on vinyl due to a limited pressing of 500 copies, the album has been remastered by Joe La Porta at Sterling Sound, and pressed to heavy translucent green vinyl. This will be the first time the album is available in record shops! Recorded in a 1940s-era Spartan trailer in Driftwood, Texas, the self-produced album is full of “experiments, detours, and well- taken chances” [-Pitchfork]. The cuts on Last Day of Summer range from jazz instrumentals to folk to psychedelia, and showcase the band’s range better than any album in their catalog. Future Radio Milk Records releases will include live recordings from White Denim and other local and international bands.

Giant sand %e2%80%93 glum %2825th anniversary edition%29

Giant Sand – Glum – 25th Anniversary Edition

1994s Glum was to be Giant Sand’s largest record and in order to make it so, Howe Gelb invited everyone along to the party. This carnival help create Giant Sand’s best record to date and Glum is now proudly re-issued by Fire Records.

A conceptual masterpiece, complete with a second disc capturing a classic KCRW Morning Becomes Eclectic session just prior to the original album’s release in 1994. An epic windswept desert dry encounter with one of America’s greatest bands that traverses genres and styles to create a complete masterpiece.

John Fogerty  –  50-Year Trip: Live at Red Rocks

This concert was recorded on June 20, 2019 as part of John Fogerty’s 50 year celebration of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Woodstock performance.  The 19-song concert features such Woodstock highlights as “Born on the Bayou,” “Green River,” “Bad Moon Rising,” “Proud Mary,” “Keep On Chooglin’,” and “Suzie Q,” alongside later hits like “Centerfield” and “The Old Man Down the Road.”

The Nazz – Open Our Eyes: The Anthology

Purple Pyramid/Cleopatra reissue the 2002 double-disc, 35-song anthology from Todd Rundgren’s early band The Nazz, right down to the original foldout artwork.

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, people standing

With a multitude of tour dates on either side of the Atlantic promoting her excellent 2018 album, “Historian”, you could forgive Lucy Dacus for taking it easy on the new music for a bit. Thankfully though, you won’t need to, as Lucy has set up an almost Sufjan Stevens’ level of niche musical project, attempting to construct a series of Holiday themed tracks, to be released across 2019 for various days from Christmas and Halloween through to Bruce Springsteen’s Birthday .

This week’s offering comes in the shape of My Mother & I, release to coincide with both Taurus Season, when both Lucy and her mother were born, and the American version of Mother’s day. High concepts aside, My Mother & I is a beautiful track, with no need for a backstory. The track is both a reflection on all sorts of shared characteristics mother and child can share, from problems with body image through to the shared stubbornness and empathy traditionally associated with those babies born in the month of May. Lucy puts it far better than we ever could, ‘We — daughters, and all children — easily inherit the shame and fear of our mothers, but also the pride, self-assurance, and lessons of love.” If you weren’t already excited about the remaining holidays in 2019 already, Lucy Dacus has given us all plenty to be thrilled about.

My Mother & I is out now via Matador Records.

Image may contain: 1 person, selfie and close-up

Last summer just a few weeks after Dacus’s highly anticipated LP Historian was released on Matador Records, the Richmond, Va.-based singer/guitarist and her band descended on SXSW for an incredible 17 sets. It was a remarkable feat, especially considering the emotional power packed into Dacus’s music. Here is a major leap forward in just a few short years. Dacus is one of the brightest young songwriters in music right now. Live performances of songs like “Night Shift” and “Pillar of Truth” carried the same impact as they do on Historian, even without the horns and string sections that appear on that remarkable record.

At just 23, Lucy Dacus is well beyond her years. One listen to her sophomore record Historian and you’ll know. The album is a deep meditation on loss and redemption, filled with stories from Dacus’ past and surrounded by crunchy guitars and distortion, a la PJ Harvey and the Pixies. “A lot of the songs revert back to very specific moments, but I didn’t write [them] in the moment,” she says. “They just came out over time the way that they did. There wasn’t this immediate translation from life to song.” Dacus grew up in Richmond, Va., surrounding herself with music her whole life. She started singing early on as a child, graduating to church choir soon after. In middle school, she bought a guitar and started learning chords and, in high school, she finally took the plunge and started writing her own music. After high school, she got the courage to start playing live in front of people. Her first album, 2016’s No Burden, was recorded super lo-fi—no recording budget, no expectations, no fans to consider. She issued it via Richmond upstart label EggHunt Records and it gained the attention of Matador Records, who re-released it, propping her up onto an international stage just like that. When it came time to write Historian, a newfound pressure existed, and she says that an ever-present feeling loomed throughout the recording process. “There’s a responsibility now,” she says. “I don’t take it lightly. It’s not necessarily stressful, but it is a weight.” Dacus’ extreme confessions on songs like “Night Shift,” “Body to Flame” and “Pillar of Truth” are Historian album highlights, but it’s clear that the whole thing has an emotional heft to it that you don’t hear often with early twenty-somethings. “It’s really normal to be anxious,” she says. “There are these immediate pressures— politically, culturally, and within my family or friend groups—[and] there seems to be a lot of confusion in my life. That comes through on the album as me trying to maintain hope throughout those things. I would feel like a failure if that didn’t come through.”

Lucy Dacus is done thinking small. Two years after her 2016 debut, No Burden, won her unanimous acclaim as one of rock’s most promising new voices, Dacus returned with Historian, a remarkably assured 10-track statement of intent. It finds her unafraid to take on the big questions — the life-or-death reckonings, and the ones that just feel that way. It’s a record full of bracing realizations, tearful declarations and moments of hard-won peace, expressed in lyrics that feel destined for countless yearbook quotes and first tattoos.
“This is the album I needed to make,” says Dacus, who views Historian as her definitive statement as a songwriter and musician. “Everything after this is a bonus.”

Image may contain: 3 people, people sitting and guitar

At the tail end of Boygenius’ penultimate song in their live set, Julien Baker shreds on the guitar, playing a classic rock-inspired solo that’s completely out of place in her or either of her bandmates’ back catalogue. It’s something Lucy Dacus mentioned in a recent interview, that in the recording sessions for the Boygenius EP, Phoebe Bridgers would “suggest an idea as a joke, and then we realized, ‘Wait, this is an amazing idea!’” Those lighthearted, playful vibes are very much on display when you see the folk supergroup live; when Baker begins to solo, Bridgers and Dacus try their absolute hardest to get her to laugh, sometimes waving lighters and other times rolling around on the ground. The trio’s live energy is undeniably infectious and the crowd is more than willing to send it right back, even at the end of a show that spans four whole hours. This round of Boygenius shows, likely to be the only ones of their kind, simply represent three good—and generationally talented—friends at the top of their respective songwriting games, having the time of their lives. While there’s a definite “I was there” feeling to these shows, we definitely hope this likely once-in-a-lifetime tour happens again sooner rather than later.

Boygenius performs “Me & My Dog” for Late Night with Seth Meyers.

Image may contain: 3 people, people sitting and guitar

New Indie-rock godsends Boygenius aka Phoebe Bridgers, Julien Baker and Lucy Dacus  made their TV debut on Monday’s Late Night with Seth Meyers, performing the song “Me & My Dog,” one of the three singles from their self-titled debut EP.

Bridgers takes lead on “Me & My Dog,” and if her opening lines (“We had a great day / even though we forgot to eat / and you had a bad dream”) don’t send shivers down your spine, you may want to verify that you have a heartbeat. Seeing Bridgers, Baker and Dacus step to their mics to sing in unison—to say nothing of Bridgers’ towering sustained note at the song’s climax is nearly sublime enough to make one forget what an anxiety-ridden day today is.

The trio surprise-released boygenius on digital platforms on October. 26th, two weeks ahead of its official physical release this Friday, November 9th. Bridgers, Baker and Dacus wll embark on a North American tour together .

Boygenius perform “Me & My Dog” on Late Night

boygenius packshot.jpg

The good people at Matador Records have finally pulled back the curtain on their new supergroup made up of songwriters Lucy Dacus, Julien Baker and Phoebe Bridgers. The all-star trio’s self-titled, six-track EP Boygenius is coming out on November. 9th via Matador, but you can hear the project’s first three singles now.

Dacus, Baker and Bridgers’ mysterious and much-anticipated team-up first made waves in early August when Bridgers confirmed its existence at an NPR Music event. Soon after, a media outlet received a photo of the group, accompanied only by the word “boygenius” and the Matador logo. We now know that to be the name of both the trio and their forthcoming release, previewed via lead singles “Me & My Dog,” “Bite The Hand” and “Stay Down.”

Bridgers takes point on the affectionate, yet anxiety-ridden “Me & My Dog,” singing over steady electric guitar strums, “I had a fever / until I met you / Now you make me cool / but sometimes I still do / something embarrassing,” her gossamer vocals giving way to delicate banjo notes and droning synths. Baker’s voice bolsters Bridgers’ as the chorus-less song crescendos, pushing through the fears that obstruct desire. “I dream about it and I wake up from it,” the duo conclude, their voices drowned out by a rising tide of reverb.

Second single “Bite The Hand” is Dacus’ chance to shine, an unflinching declaration of independence that would have fit right in on Historian. What sets it apart from her solo work, however, is its choruses, on which Dacus, Baker and Bridgers harmonize to drop-dead gorgeous and increasingly powerful effect, warning an unwanted partner, “I can’t love you how you want me to.” The song closes on their voices, with nothing but bare conviction against the silence.

The devastating “Stay Down,” meanwhile, is all Baker, her trademark reverb-steeped guitars and emotive vocals expanded upon with scattershot percussion and moving strings. Her lyrics are shot through with heart-rending resignation: “I wasn’t a fighter till somebody told me / I had better learn to lean into the punch / so it don’t hurt as bad when they leave / There you were, turning your cheek,” Baker begins, later demanding, “Push me down into the water like a sinner, roll me under / and I’ll never come up again / I’ll just stay down.” Fuck us up, boygenius.

 

Dacus, Baker and Bridgers head out on tour together this November, though they won’t do so as a trio—rather, they’ll each be performing their own solo sets. But who knows? Judging by the unpredictable way in which their boygenius team-up has come to light, perhaps the collaborators will see their way to delivering some surprises live, as well.

Julien Baker, Phoebe Bridgers, and Lucy Dacus formed Boygenius after booking a tour together, but the trio had subconsciously been in the works for longer than that. Through a series of tours and performances together, and chance encounters that led to friendships – including Bridgers’ and Dacus’ first in-person meeting backstage at a Philadelphia festival, greenroom hangouts that felt instantly comfortable and compatible, a couple of long email chains and even a secret handshake between Baker and Dacus – the lyrically and musically arresting singer-songwriters and kindred spirits got to know each other on their own terms.

“When we met, Lucy and Phoebe and I were in similar places in our lives and our musical endeavors, but also had similar attitudes toward music that engendered an immediate affinity,” Baker explains. “Lucy and Phoebe are incredibly gifted performers, and I am fans of their art outside of being their friends, but they are also both very wise, discerning and kind people whom I look up to in character as much as in talent.”

Listen to boygenius’ EP “Me & My Dog,” “Bite The Hand” and “Stay Down”.