Posts Tagged ‘Los Angeles Police Department’

Ryan Pollie Announces New Self-Titled Album

Inspired by the warm, inviting sounds of ’70s singer-songwriters like Jackson Browne, Carole King, and Graham Nash, Ryan Pollie is the most personal music of the seasoned songwriter’s career to date. Leading the showcase is the video for “Aim Slow,” a touching clip featuring childhood home videos and footage taken during Ryan’s recent chemotherapy. The song is the lyrical centerpiece to the album and addresses the paradoxical nature of life and death, good and evil, yin and yang. Weaved throughout the song is a story of a struggling romance, the beauty and pain of what goes into love, and “Aim Slow” proves to be successful to Pollie personally – it tells his story which is one of love and searching.

Ryan Pollie had released two albums as Los Angeles Police Department, and working on his soon-to-be-released, self-titled studio album, he prepared himself to shed the protective barrier of his old band name — to make music, simply, as himself.

And then he got cancer. Nearing the end of his twenties, Pollie had already been mulling over the big questions: spirituality, purpose, the fleeting nature of existence. “I just wrote a record about mortality and whether or not I believe in anything, and then I’m faced with the biggest challenge of my life,” he says. Open, searching, and vulnerable, Ryan Pollie takes full advantage of the language of 20th century California pop to bolster its queries on the perplexing nature of being human. Piano, guitar, and bass intertwine with banjo, pedal steel, and saxophone to support Pollie’s sugar-sweet hooks.

Bolder and crisper than the albums he’s made as Los Angeles Police Department, the new album emerges from a deeply collaborative place. As Pollie went through chemotherapy in the summer of 2018, he relied on the support of his friends to finish the album. “Mixing is where it all came together for me,” he says. “Because I was sick, it was this new challenge — ‘I have to finish this record. I have to get out of bed. I don’t feel too well, but I’m going to go down the street to the studio and I’m going to give my notes and overdub some piano.’ I finished the record while I was sick, and that was a big thing for me, being sick and being able to finish something. It made me feel strong.”

One song, “Only Child,” addresses that period directly. Ironically, it’s one of the more upbeat tracks on the record, tackling the fear and uncertainty of illness with Pollie’s characteristic levity and humor. “My hair is falling out/My parents are calling now,” he sings amid a buoyant bassline and trills of flute. Other songs work through periods of loss, confusion, and ultimately triumph. The delicate, synth-driven “Raincoat” traces the end of a relationship with careful empathy. Against a briskly strummed guitar, “Leaving California” fleshes out his relationship with his parents and his childhood home in New England, while “Getting Clean” makes use of a glowing West Coast pop palette to articulate the frustration of trying to break out of a deep rut.

Living through illness becomes just one chapter in a record that celebrates living in general, and all the difficulties and surprises that come with it. More than anything, Ryan Pollie is a testament to the power of vulnerability — to the magic that happens when you open yourself up and invite the world inside, no matter how frightening or uncertain it may be.

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Los Angeles Police Department -

Ryan Pollie is gearing up to release his second album as Los Angeles Police Department, also called Los Angeles Police Department (just like the first), and so far we’ve heard “Grown” and “The Plane 2” from it. Today, he’s shared another new song called “If I Lied,” and it’s a plaintively-strummed and twangy song that sees Pollie playing with different perspectives (he says it’s “the story of a train hopper in denial of how he’s mistreated the love of his life – unsure if he’s losing her or if he’s lost her already”), and it’s a sorta pathetic but desperately sweet plea to engage in a conversation: “There are still so many things to say that day/ And if I walk, then you might run away, no way,” Pollie sings with a backing drum that sounds like the rumble of the train tracks.

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Image of Thurston Moore - Rock N Roll Consciousness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thurston Moore entered The Church studios in London to record new songs with producer Paul Epworth. Thurston, the founder of seminal US alternative rock experimentalists Sonic Youth and Paul, the celebrated producer and co-writer of Adele, The Pop Group, Florence & the Machine et al created a dynamic vibratory match (with the realization that they were both Leos, on the cusp of Cancer, born on 25 July.) The session was mixed by Randall Dunn (Marissa Nadler, Sunn 0))), Earth, Boris) at Avast! Studios in Seattle.

Thurston Moore Group had been touring since the critically acclaimed release The Best Day LP/CD (2014, Matador) that introduced the core members James Sedwards (guitar), My Bloody Valentine’s Deb Googe (bass) and Sonic Youth’s Steve Shelley (drums). Rock n Roll Consciousness is Thurston’s focus on this group’s strength, beauty and promise, with an unleashing of James Sedwards’ brilliant guitar play, Deb Googe’s minimalist groove ethic and Steve Shelley’s in-the-pocket swing dynamism.

The songs Thurston introduce are expansive, anthemic and exploratory with lyrics, co-written with poet Radio Radieux, investigating and heralding the love between angels, goddess mysticism and a belief in healing through new birth. They range from the opener “Exalted”, an unfolding and emotional journey in homage to sacred energy and exaltation, to “Cusp” a springtime charging, propulsive piece with a feeling of Sonic Youth mixing in with My Bloody Valentine to “Turn On” a pop-sonic poem to holy love both intimate and kosmiche to the contemplative mystery of life-defining time travel in “Smoke of Dreams”. The record concludes with “Aphrodite”, a strange and heavy no wave rocker in salutation to the idol of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation.

Rock n Roll Consciousness is a new and exhilarating chapter for Thurston Moore, and promises to be a creative highpoint for anyone interested in his legacy of avant-garde music and writing, as strong a statement as anything he has recorded these last three decades – serious and precocious and strangely accessible.

Image of The Cosmic Dead - Psych Is Dead

Scotland’s favourite space-psych-rock-gods return with a new album ‘Psych Is Dead’ before heading out on a lengthy UK/European tour including appearances at all the key genre festivals such as Safe As Milk, Wrong Fest, Desert Fest, Raw Power Festival and Karma Fest.

Formed in 2010, The Cosmic Dead are a quartet from Glasgow, Scotland who share their music through good vibes and better vibrations. Known for their improv, chaos strewn, Buckfast smashed against the wall take on space music, they have roamed from Roadburn to Las Vegas, Dundee to Bangalore with each album offering a meditative window into a certain time and space.

‘Psych Is Dead’ is the sixth full length album from the band, the glowing embers of a a few days spent recording in a sweaty Sardinian kitchen overlooking the Mediterranean Sea. Soon to be available on LP and CD via Riot Season Records, ‘Psych Is Dead’ is an aural exploration of their tumultuous universe.

Black honey somebody better

Limited Opaque Orange 7″ Vinyl. Like those have gone before it, Somebody Better is the next player in the terrific Black Honey single line-up. Following in the footsteps of its predecessors Corinne, All My Pride and the most recent Hello Today, once again the Brighton four-piece fronted by Izzy B. Phillips step up to the mark with a brilliantly bold statement of intent for 2017 – a festival- ready gleaming pop-rock meteor that’s headed straight for you. It is a mix of Eat to the Beat era Blondie and pop era Lush.

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There’s a singer with a voice 50 fathoms deep and the consistency of vitrified teak, who has been known to go to extremes in search of a song. Across continents, over oceans, through multiple time zones. From West Hollywood to… Tunbridge Wells. A long way – but Mark Lanegan knows the directions.

Early in 2016, Mark was at home in Los Angeles, working on some ideas for what might turn into his next album. He wasn’t too thrilled by what he was coming up with. Then he got an email from a friend, an English musician named Rob Marshall, thanking Mark for contributing to a new project he was putting together, Humanist. The pair first met in 2008, when Marshall’s former band Exit Calm supported Soulsavers, who Mark was singing with at the time. Now Rob was offering to write Mark some music to return the favour.

“I was like, Hey man, I’m getting ready to make a record, if you’ve got anything?’” Mark recalls. “Three days later he sent me *10 things… !”

In the meantime, Mark had written Blue Blue Sea, a rippling mood piece that he thought might be a more fruitful direction for his new record, and had the idea for a song called First Day Of Winter that felt like an apt closer. “It’s almost always how my records start,” he explains. “I let the first couple of songs tell me what the next couple should sound like, and it’s really the same process when I’m writing words. Whatever my first couple of lines are tell me what the next couple should be. I’ve always built things like that, sort of like making a sculpture I guess. Start with the raw material and let that point me in the direction I want to go. So, once I was pointed in that direction, the music that came from other sources, from Rob, I just went for the ones that helped me build this narrative that I had started already.”

Within an hour, Mark had written words and vocal lines for two of the pieces Rob had cooked up at Mount Sion Studios in Kent and pinged through the virtual clouds to California. Rob’s music fitted perfectly with the direction Mark had been pondering: in essence, a more expansive progression from the moody Krautrock-influenced electronica textures of his two previous albums, Blues Funeral and Phantom Radio. Eventually, Rob Marshall would co-write six of the songs on the new Mark Lanegan Band album. “I was very thankful to become reacquainted with him,” Mark deadpans.

The remainder of the album was written, recorded and produced by Lanegan’s longtime musical amanuensis Alain Johannes at his 11 AD base in West Hollywood. Everything was done and dusted within a month, unusually fast by Lanegan’s recent standards. Both Blues Funeral and Phantom Radio unfurled at leisurely pace over several months. But this time Johannes had only a fixed window of opportunity due to his ongoing touring commitments as a member of P.J. Harvey’s band. But Mark was sufficiently happy with the material to move swiftly, a reflection of contentment with his abilities as a singer and writer, which have now produced a huge body of work spanning a period of more than 30 years: whether it be his own solo records, or collaborative recordings with others, or going back to his legendary first band, the Screaming Trees.

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His second self-titled album grew out of a period of great change for Pollie both personally and professionally. The L.A. musician ended one relationship and started another. He released a debut album in 2014 to critical claim and watched as the single She Came Through (Again) became a surprise hit – the kind of bittersweet pop song destined to anchor a multitude of lovelorn mixtapes. He signed to Anti-Records and worked on Los Angeles Police Department with Jonathan Rado (Foxygen, Whitney, Lemon Twigs) producing and Rob Schnapf (Beck, Elliott Smith, Foo Fighters) mixing. Los Angeles Police Department reveals an artist turning the personal into the universal and giving a bit of himself away in the process. “I’m a student of the album, so it was important to make this more than just a collection of the best songs I had written. It had to be a journey for me and for the listener.” The journey does not end with the album, but will continue throughout his next album and his next and his next. “My music is an extension of myself and it’s definitely something that I’m going to grow with.”

Mellencampsadclowns

Heartland rocker John Mellencamp releases his 23rd full-length album, Sad Clowns and Hillbillies featuring Carlene Carter, the daughter of June Carter Cash and stepdaughter of Johnny Cash, on Island Records. Sad Clowns and Hillbillies returns Mellencamp to the musical eclecticism that is, itself, a reflection of his wide-ranging musings on life. John Mellencamp is an authentic voice of American music and master storyteller with a commitment to creating traditional rock and roll, bittersweet songs of happiness and melancholia, and fervent political dissent. His passions and experiences resonate beautifully in this showcase of his music. Sad Clowns and Hillbillies is self produced by John Mellencamp.

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Pinegrove’s Everything So Far is exactly what its title suggests – an anthology of all of Pinegrove’s output up to the point of their breakout Run For Cover Records full-length, Cardinal. The collection encapsulates their debut LP Meridian, a number of EPs and even some singles like the captivating track Angelina and Cardinal favourite New Friends. Originally available only on cassette with a shorter tracklist. Listening to Everything So Far is a rewarding experience for new and old fans, as the time capsule of a tracklist shows Pinegrove developing a signature sound, maturing and learning with each song.

2LP – First time on vinyl and pressed as a double album. The vinyl version also includes a brand-new 16 page booklet featuring lyrics and photos documenting the band’s earliest moments.

Hmltd to the door aw

HMLTD release their second single To The Door backed up by the equally stunning B-side Music!. The single is available as a limited 7” on Ouroboros Ltd. The six-piece, whose origins lie somewhere between the UK, Greece and France, have come up as one of the most confounding acts to appear in London in recent memory, with equally galvanizing music and visuals, stories of chaotic and incendiary live shows to packs of mosh-pitting followers and compatriots, and art installations where the lines between performers and audience are ever-blurred. Continuing their collaboration with director Jenkin Van Zyl, To The Door is an audio-visual bucking bronco ride of fantasy and myth, sci-fi and the terrestrial, savagery and élan, the unattainable and the tactile, coming together for a mesmerising assault on the senses. It’s another opportunity to join HMLTD’s uncompromising, all-in, fiercely adventurous and wholly irresistible world.

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274 Copies only limited-edition red vinyl 7″ single of Lorelle Meets The Obsolete’s ace The Sound Of All Things, taken from last year’s acclaimed fourth album, Balance. It’s the long song where lapping, ambient beauty gives way to a stormy sea of psych-rock, like Moon Duo tripping out with The Orb. According to the band, it’s all inspired by John Cage and the ocean near their home in Ensenada, Baja California. It comes backed with a brand new remix by the wonderful Russian band Gnoomes, who have turned it into an electro-psych monster.

Wilsen i go missing in my sleep album cover artwork hires 600x600

First appearing on the scene with the self-released Sirens double-EP (2013) and Magnolia EP (2014). Tours with Daughter, Matthew E. White, San Fermin and shows with London Grammar soon followed. Tamsin has also lent her vocals to Honne’s Coastal Love and a vocal line of hers is used in a SBTRKT song. I Go Missing In My Sleep is Wilsen’s debut album and was recorded with producer Ben Baptie in upstate New York and atThe Farm Studio outside of Philadelphia. Many of the songs were composed in a tiny Brooklyn apartmentin the fleeting pre-dawn moments when New York City is mostly still. These beautifully crafted original pieces capture an almost impossible sense of delicate quietness, and when it came time to record them with the band – Drew Arndt on bass and Johnny Simon on guitar – they unfurled at a nexus of hushed and heart-racing, intimate folk paired with muscular yet restrained sonic experimentation. It evokes the mood of Nick Drake and epic soundscapes in the vein of Arcade Fire.

Bert Jansch - Living In The Shadows Part 2: On The Edge Of A Dream

Following on from Earth’s definitive collection of Jansch’s 1990s works ‘Living In The Shadows Part 2: On The Edge Of A Dream’ picks up from where it left off, bringing together Bert Jansch’s final recordings, made between 2000 and 2006. This remarkable anthology documents some of Jansch’s finest work, and a man at the top of his game, some forty years(!) after his first release. From the brooding resonance of Crimson Moon (where Jansch is joined by Johnny Marr, Bernard Butler and Johnny “Guitar” Hodge, as well as son Adam Jansch and Bert’s wife Loren Jansch) to the intimacy of Edge Of A Dream (Bernard Butler, Hope Sandoval, Dave Swarbrick, Ralph McTell, Johnny “Guitar” Hodge, Paul Wassif, Adam Jansch and Loren Jansch) to the wondrous new folk / trad folk harmony of Black Swan (Beth Orton, Devendra Banhart, Kevin Barker, Helena Espvall, Paul Wassif), these seemingly very different albums all speak of one thing: Bert’s natural talent for turning out extraordinary music, regardless of genre. Disc four, The Setting Of The Sun, takes in more demos and unreleased material, with guest appearances from Gordon Giltrap and Johnny Marr adding additional delight for fans old and new. These peeks into Jansch’s recording process are nothing if not fascinating, with his home studio lending itself perfectly to any recording fancy he might arrive at. Like Part 1, this deluxe case-bound set exhibits the sublime attention to detail that has become Earth Recordings’ calling card. Liner notes come courtesy of colleague Bernard Butler and Bert’s son Adam, while a comprehensive listening guide (by esteemed journalist, Dave Henderson) is also included.

 

Newly signed to the Anti- label, Los Angeles-based Ryan Pollie – better known under his moniker of Los Angeles Police Department – sets out his second, self-titled album on April 28th.

The follow-up to his 2014 debut (also a self-titled effort), was produced by Foxygen’s Jonathan Rado (Whitney, The Lemon Twigs) and mixed by Rob Schnapf (Beck, Elliott Smith, Foo Fighters), Pollie describes the album – which addresses suicide and addiction, anxiety and bereavement – as “a coming-of-age story.”:

“You always think of coming-of-age stories as something that happens to kids, something like Stand By Me or Catcher in the Rye, but in my twenties I realized that I was always going to face this vulnerability and this anxiety. I’m never going to be that wise old person who’s cold-hearted and knows everything. So this record is about learning to face up to those fears and be emotionally responsible.”

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Music & Lyrics by: Ryan Pollie
Produced by: Jonathan Rado

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Ryan Pollie is gearing up to release his second album as Los Angeles Police Department, and so far we’ve heard I Absolutely adore this sincere songwriting style . The tracks  “Grown” and The Plane 2 from the album. Today, he’s shared another new song called “If I Lied,” and it’s a plaintively-strummed and twangy song that sees Pollie playing with different perspectives (he says it’s “the story of a train hopper in denial of how he’s mistreated the love of his life  unsure if he’s losing her or if he’s lost her already”), and it’s a sorta pathetic but desperately sweet plea to engage in a conversation: “There are still so many things to say that day/ And if I walk, then you might run away, no way,” Pollie sings with a backing drum that sounds like the rumble of the train tracks.

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“If I Lied” by Los Angeles Police Department from the self-titled second album, available due April 28th

“I’m a student of the album, so it was important to make this more than just a collection of the best songs I had written,” says Pollie, who started Los Angeles Police Department in 2013. “It had to be a journey for me and for the listener.”

 

We named Los Angeles Police Department as a band to watch based on the strength of their debut album released in 2014 , and they followed that up with a string of singles over the last year, including Insecurity,” “Water And Wine,” andHard.” Today, Ryan Pollie has announced that LAPD has signed to Anti- Records for a full-length coming later this year, and has since shared a new single called “The Plane 2.” It’s the most lush and ambitious thing that Pollie’s put out under the name yet, a gleaming declaration of devotion that crackles past the four minute mark before cutting out abruptly for a warm piano outro.

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SoCal songwriter Ryan Pollie expertly weaves bedroom pop under the moniker Los Angeles Police Department. and is now gearing up to unveil his follow-up LP later this year.

Pollie’s first for label ANTI- (Japandroids, Neko Case), the record is being teased today with a new single called “The Plane 2”. A press release writes that it’s a love song “deeply adventurous in arrangement,” an apt description considering the loops and layers of twinkling xylophone, dusty percussion, and elastic synths.

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“The Plane 2″ is out now. A full-length is due out later this year

Los Angeles based singer-songwriter Ryan Pollie has been quietly releasing music under the moniker Los Angeles Police Department since the debut of his debut self titled album way back in 2014. For a tender new number called “Hard,” Pollie linked with Foxygen’s Jonathan Rado for some production assistance. The song offers some low-key, lackadaisical comfort for anyone feeling anxious about the pitfalls of love—just in time for Valentine’s Day, a holiday that’s come to be enshrouded in cynicism. It’s hard to be in love, he sings. It’s reminder that while being single can be lonely, having something to lose can be even scarier.

“I remember writing this song outside in back of my house drinking with Samuel Adams on a pretty day,” Pollie said “Things were getting more serious with my girlfriend, so naturally with all the good feelings came being terrified of our future, all the possible complications that could arise, and ruin everything. Sometimes it’s hard to enjoy the good parts of life without thinking about how they could eventually turn bad,” he wrote. “I think getting out negative thoughts in my music helps me work things out and be more positive in general if that makes sense.”

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Los Angeles Police Department is the solo project of Ryan Pollie, a songwriter who never hesitates to up share his innermost insecurities. This quiet act of bravery allows listeners to feel very close to Pollie, like he’s handing us a tiny piece of his heart without asking for anything in return. That quality is one of the reasons we named LAPD as a Band To Watch, and it’s evident in his latest song. “Water And Wine” is the B-side of Ryan Pollie’s new 7″, out next week on Fat Possum Records. We’ve already heard the A-Side, Insecurity.”  Now listen to the equally lovely “Water And Wine”.

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Ryan Pollie has maintained a steady output since he began releasing material under the moniker of Los Angeles Police Department. He quickly followed up last fall’s home-recorded self-titled debut with a downer Christmas single called “Oh Lonely Night”. Now, he’s back at it again with a new 7-inch single out February 24th via Fat Possum Records.

Entitled “Insecurity”, the track is marked by copious guitar distortion and booming drum tones, with Pollie’s self-deprecating lyrics even harsher overtop the crackling, lo-fi production. Los Angeles Police Department – aka Los Angeles-based songwriter Ryan Pollie We have been watching/listening to Pollie’s (ex-Warm Weather) fuzzy, lo-fi works for a year now since he first dropped ‘Waste’ our way last February from his California bedroom, followed by his self-titled eleven-track debut album, which was released in September thru Forged Artifacts/ChillMegaChill.

Now signed to Fat Possum, his debut single for the label, ‘Insecurity’, is a three-and-a-half minute morning after reflection on a one night stand. Introspective lyrics run with distorted guitars and far-out drumd in a typical LAPD lo-fi production.’