Posts Tagged ‘Julia Holter’

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Julia Holter has described Aviary as “the cacophony of the mind in a melting world”, and it’s easy to feel that mania in its erratic structures and fleeting absurdity. But very often those segments bloom into long and sustained areas of beauty. The thing is, neither the harmony nor the ugliness is given more prominence – they are both valid states and one will always lead to the other.

Aviary is an epic journey through what Julia Holter describes as “the cacophony of the mind in a melting world.” Out on October 26th via Domino Recordings, it’s the Los Angeles composer’s most breathtakingly expansive album yet, full of startling turns and dazzling instrumental arrangements.

The follow-up to her critically acclaimed 2015 record, Have You in My Wilderness, it takes as its starting point a line from a 2009 short story by writer Etel Adnan: “I found myself in an aviary full of shrieking birds.” It’s a scenario that sounds straight out of a horror movie, but it’s also a pretty good metaphor for life in 2018, with its endless onslaught of political scandals, freakish natural disasters, and voices shouting their desires and resentments into the void

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Aviary, executive produced by Cole MGN and produced by Holter and Kenny Gilmore, combines Holter’s slyly theatrical vocals and Blade Runner-inspired synth work with an enveloping palette of strings and percussion that reveals itself, and the boundless scope of her vision, over the course of fifteen songs. Holter was joined by Corey Fogel (percussion), Devin Hoff (bass), Dina Maccabee (violin, viola, vocals), Sarah Belle Reid (trumpet), Andrew Tholl (violin), and Tashi Wada (synth, bagpipes).

Released October 26th, 2018

“Words I Heard” is a literary deep-dive into a world of sensory warmth that serves as a contrast to Julia Holter’s examination of what she called “the cacophony of the mind in a melting world.” The song’s orchestral accompaniment swirls like fog, a picturesque landscape for Holter to stroll through as she draws on sources from Dante to Lebanese-American poet Etel Adnan for lyrical inspiration.

“Tall trees of so many kinds, from redwoods to manzanitas, oaks, madrones, maples and elms, plants and bushes, flowers and seeds, acorns and grass, they all are the last chance of the earth and they all make a thick and permanent coat, a cover, a bath of perfume, a touch of healing, a royal procession, music and fanfare, they rise and talk to Tamalpais, and sing lullabies and songs of love.” – Etel Adnan, ‘Journey to Mount Tamalpais’ “When Julia told me that the title of her album was inspired by Etel Adnan, one of my favorite writers, I felt that I had to make a film for one of the songs on Mount Tamalpais, a recurring subject in both Adnan’s visual art and her writing. I filmed on a few hikes down the Dipsea trail, and in the last section of the song combine this with footage made during the studio sessions of the album.” – Dicky Bahto .

Directed by Dicky Bahto Devin Hoff – Double bass Julia Holter – Vocals, piano, synth Dina Maccabee – Violin, viola Andrew Tholl – Violin

Julia Holter – “Words I Heard” from ‘Aviary’, released 26th October 2018 on Domino Record Co.

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I’m so happy to share news of my new record “Aviary”, due out October 26th.

I hope whoever listens will choose their own way to listen and find their own path with it, not necessarily start to finish or all at once. It’s all the winged things flying around in the head, the memories and the current thoughts, all at once. This is a record I feel so fortunate to have been able to make–a lot of it is built upon different improvisatory moments of cathartic music-making at a time where it’s hard to find the words to express oneself, indulging in sound, almost like therapeutic or something. And then working with old friends/collaborators Cole MGN and Kenny Gilmore to develop the sounds of these moments and record many more of them in the studio with great musician friends (Corey Fogel, Devin Hoff, Dina Maccabee, Sarah Belle Reid, Andrew Tholl, Tashi Wada). It was a wonderful journey. Thanks as well to my good friend Dicky Bahto for his beautiful artwork.

Thank you so much for listening

Julia Holter“I Shall Love 2” from ‘Aviary’, released 26th October 2018 on Domino Record Co.

Julia Holter’s magnificent In The Same Room is comprised of new arrangements of songs from three of her previous studio releases and   it’s an essential release for anyone who has witnessed her brilliant, beguiling band on tour, as well as the perfect introduction to a truly important and innovative young artist.

“A dazzling insight into the fluidity of Julia Holter’s approach to live music.”  MOJO

In The Same Room

Image: Julia Holter In The Same Room press shot

Domino Recordings is proud to launch “Documents”, an irregular new series of live studio recordings designed to capture the ever-evolving arrangements of our artists and their bands in high fidelity. Taking its inspiration from classic BBC sessions, each Documents release will be recorded in no more than a day or two at a world class studio in London. Or at least that’s the plan.

The first official Documents release is In The Same Room by Julia Holter, although Domino count Villagers’ “Where Have You Been All My Life?” as the honorary inaugural Document in all but name.

“In The Same Room” – to be released March 31st 2017 – is named after a song from Holter’s 2012 album “Ekstasis”, and this new career-spanning collection is the fruit of two days recording by Julia and her tremendous band (Corey Fogel – drums/vocals; Dina Maccabee – viola/vocals and Devin Hoff – stand-up bass) at RAK Studios in the days after their main stage performance at Green Man Festival in Wales.

Listen to ‘So Lillies’, a re-working of the track from her debut album “Tragedy” (2011) that highlights Julia’s constant progression and the breadth of her capabilities.

Comprised of new arrangements of songs from three of her previous studio releases (Tragedy, Loud City Song and 2015’s breakthrough Have You In My Wilderness), Holter’s Domino Documents is an essential release for anyone who has witnessed her brilliant, beguiling band on tour around the world in the last five years as well as the perfect introduction to a truly important and innovative young artist.

In the 15 months since Have You In My Wilderness, Julia has gone from strength to strength, including playing the biggest headline show of her career in the UK last month – at London’s Shepherd’s Bush Empire – and scoring the soundtrack for the new Miles Teller film Bleed For This.

“In The Same Room” Tracklisting:

  1. Horns Surrounding Me (Live at RAK)
  2. So Lillies (Live at RAK)
  3. Silhouette (Live at RAK)
  4. How Long (Live at RAK)
  5. Feel You (Live at RAK)
  6. Lucette Stranded on the Island (Live at RAK)
  7. In The Green Wild (Live at RAK)
  8. City Appearing (Live at RAK)
  9. Vasquez (Live at RAK)
  10. Betsy on the Roof (Live at RAK)
  11. Sea Calls Me Home (Live at RAK)

In The Same Room is available to pre-order now on limited edition deluxe coloured vinyl with exclusive Polaroid photographs from the RAK session, standard vinyl, CD and digital download.

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Julia Holter, is preparing to release her new live album “In The Same Room” through the new Domino Documents imprint, has shared a live version of ‘Silhouette’.

Domino Documents, a new string to the bow of the already fledgling label, is an irregular series of live studio recordings designed to capture the ever-evolving arrangements of their artists.

Named after a song from Holter’s 2012 album Ekstasis, In The Same Room is the fruit of two days recording by Julia and her tremendous band at RAK Studios in the days after their main stage performance at Green Man Festival in Wales last year.

Julia Holter shares re-working of 'Horns Surrounding Me'

Julia Holter, is set to release her new album “In The Same Room” through the new Domino Documents imprint, she has also shared a haunting re-working ofthe track ‘Horns Surrounding Me’.

The forthcoming live studio record kicks off a new start for both Holter and Domino Recordings, an arrangement sees a new irregular series of live studio recordings designed to capture the ever-evolving arrangements of our artists and their bands in high fidelity.

Taking its inspiration from classic BBC sessions, each Domino Documents release will be recorded in no more than a day or two at a studio in London – or at least that’s they plan. In The Same Room to be released March 31st 2017 – is named after a song from Julia Holter’s 2012 album “Ekstasis”, and this new career-spanning collection is the fruit of two days recording by Julia and her tremendous band at RAK Studios in the days after their main stage performance at Green Man Festival in Wales.

Julia Holter leads the way for the new Domino subsidiary

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Julia Holter has announced a new live record titled “In The Same Room”, and share the first cut “So Lillies” Holter’s new LP was recorded at RAK Studios shortly after her set at Green Man in Wales this summer. It’s named after a track on 2012 record Ekstasis and features material from throughout her career – the original take of “So Lillies” (the new version can be heard above) appeared on 2011 her debut Tragedy.

In The Same Room is the first in a new series by Domino Recordings called Documents that seeks to capture “the ever-evolving arrangements of our artists and their bands in high fidelity.” Each release will be constructed over the course of no longer than two days in a London studio (if all goes to plan, that is).

Villagers’ Where Have You Been All My Life? is also considered to be part of the new Documents series, if not technically labelled as such.

Julia Holter’s LP Have You In My Wilderness was named among our Best Albums Of 2015 .

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Arguably the summer’s nicest and prettiest sited festival, its closest rival is End of the Road, in Dorset in September. The Green Man offers a stunning location in the Brecon Beacons of Wales, There is plenty to do that isn’t music, including talks, films and activities, and a list of artists who bathe in acclaim: Belle & Sebastian, James Blake, Julia Holter, Jason Isbell, White Denim, Floating Points and many more. Do take waterproofs though: Green Man has a reputation for wetness.
Set in the lovely Brecon Beacons, Green Man returns for its 14th year on Thursday 18th August. Headlining this year’s edition are a plethora of British acts Belle and Sebastian, are celebrating their 20th anniversary, James Blake and Laura Marling, with the Wild Beasts kicking things off on the Thursday night.
If that sounds worryingly light to you, then don’t worry chaotic merchants Fat White Family will be there, as will Aussie psychedelics Jagwar Ma and lo-fi rockers Unknown Mortal Orchestra. And, err, Charlotte Church’s Late Night Pop Dungeon.
But if you’re here then you’ve probably already heard of the above headliners . What you’re here for is some newer music, which is just as well because Green Man features a number of artists who you need to check out and also includes the excellent Rising Stage for new and upcoming artists .
Gengahr have been one of my favourites for this last year to see , a hardworking band that has emerged over the last two years with strong songs and a great live presence they have, of course, gone on to vindicate their number 2 spot in the Top of the Tips 2014, with their superb debut album “A Dream Outside” receiving rave reviews last year. The Londoners will be worth catching on the main Mountain Stage on Sunday afternoon if you’re into dreamy guitar  driven sounds.

If you head over to the Far Out Stage early on the Saturday you’ll be able to catch Belfast band Sea Pinks, who we described as ‘merging indie stars. Stick around a bit longer and on the same stage you can also see groovers Formation, They are London twins tipped back in January 2015. Also on on the Saturday worth checking in the Walled Garden is Ardyn, who we labelled ‘dark indie pop’ and likened to Austra and Charlotte OC.
The Green Man Rising competition was this year won by Tony Njoku, who opens the Mountain Stage on Friday and is described by the festival as making ‘strikingly evocative soundscapes’. One of the competition runners-up who’ll be playing the Rising Stage on the Saturday is self-described ‘jangle pop’ duo Her’s; we loved their dreamy debut ‘Dorothy’ back in April. You can also hear the exciting new project from Sarah Howells from Paper Aeroplanes, Bryde at the Rising Stage on Saturday, and on Sunday you might want to catch Matt Maltese who we bracketed in with Tom Odell last year.

So to everyone that’s off to Green Man Festival this weekend ,eat well, take your water proofs and enjoy yourselves. Here’s our big list of recommendations:
Flamingods, Trevor Sensor, Floating Points, Ryley Walker, White Denim , Dungen , Beak , Oh Sister, SUUNS, Mothers, Happy Meal Ltd., FEWS. and of course you should not miss King Gizzard and the Wizard Lizard. and try if you can to check out Baba Naga and Lush’s return. 

Songhoy Blues The quartet are set to play the Mountain Stage on Sunday 21st August, and hopefully their fusion of traditional West African guitar riffs and deep rooted bluesy yet totally danceable beats will match the weather. Hailing from Mali, Songhoy Blues have seen success here of late, having played at The Great Escape Festival in May and several other European festivals this summer after the release of their latest album ‘Music In Exhile’.

Whitney The band from Chicago have been growing in notoriety as of late, with their brooding brand of indie-rock making waves this side of the pond. They’re ones to watch, and will be fantastically unique to see them perform in such an idyllic setting.

Margaret Glaspy could be a suprise highlight, The Californian’s debut record is raw at times, always honest and chock full of wry observations and personal disclosures. Production values of Emotions and Math are intentionally subtle, always placing Margaret Glaspy’s bluesy voice and her coarse guitar front and centre. This should make for a thrilling Sunday afternoon on the Mountain Stage.

Julia Holter is definitely appreciated in this country. A tour in the spring saw her successfully support the release of Have You in My Wilderness and she’ll be returning for another extended stay in November. What’s the appeal? Well, we can be an eccentric bunch over here in the UK and this record is full of gloriously idiosyncratic musical moments along with her incredible vocals that just click in the most agreeable way. The Mountain Stage will be the perfect place to meet up with this warm-hearted Californian.

Bryde is a new project from Sarah Howells’ who is known to many as one half of Welsh duo Paper Aeroplanes but she arrives in the Black Mountains of the Brecon Beacons as Bryde this year. She began the solo project in 2015 and the Rising tent should be an amazing way to experience Howell’s compellingly fragile compositions which hint at something much darker, lurking in the shadows.

Tindersticks Formed twenty-five years ago in Nottingham, the alt-rockers are set to play the Mountain Stage on the Saturday, just before the rollicking rhythms of Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros and headliner Laura Marling. Their elegant and heart-warming brand of alt-rock will certainly have us a) contemplating life and everything in between, and b) dancing in a field to our hearts content.

Check out The Cinedrome

We will most likely be paying more attention to the bands playing across the weekend, but the festival organisers have drummed up some must-see films for this years ‘At The Cinedrome’, including movies Purple Rain and Labyrinth (clearly in homage to the late David Bowie and Prince), as well as The Jungle Book, Inside Out, High Rise and sci-fi masterpiece Metropolis with a live piano player.

we’ve add nine new fantastic flicks to the already bumper packed Cinedrome.
We’re very pleased to be showing the UK premier of one of the funniest and most delightful films of the year Hunt for the Wilderpeople, The New Zealand adventure comedy-drama film, written and directed by Taika Waititi.

We also welcome a very special BAFTA Cymru screening of Gary Numan: Android In La La Land, the brand new Gary Numan documentary which explores life for Gary and his Numanoid family as they set up home in California and as Gary records his 2013 album ‘Splinter’.
Our day of David Bowie themed activities begins with an anniversary screening of Jim Henson’s ’80s cult hit Labyrinth Movie. On Sunday we remember another tragically fallen idol with a presentation of Prince’s Purple Rain.
On Sunday morning, we’ll be showing Disney’s new version of classic The Jungle Book, which will keep Little Folks (and their parents) mesmerised for a few hours.. Plus we have – Midnight Special Movie,Starman, Everybody Wants Some Movie, Couple In a Hole. Not only will you be able to feast your eyes upon family favourites and cult classics galore, you can also enjoy the sounds of Cate le Bon’s drummer Droor and dance the blues at Green Man’s latest (and very hush hush) venture, the Late Night David Bowie Disco; you’ll have to see it for yourselves

Giggle along with Green Man 2016 as we take a first look at this year’s comedy line-up. Chuckling along to some of the UK’s best up-and-coming comics has become a quintessential part of the Green Man experience, and this year’s laugh-a-minute line-up promises to be pretty special.
If you can’t choose between music and comedy, you need The Horne Section in your life. Comedian Alex Horne and his talented troubadours combine spontaneous stand-up with improvised tunes, resulting in a hilarious hybrid. John Shuttleworth is responsible for some ingeniously funny songs; don’t miss the old school entertainer singing about school dinners and Curly Wurly wrappers.

The belly-laugh-inducing brilliance of David Trent promises to have you guffawing into your Growlers. Also the fantastically delusional one-man-band antics of Rob Deering Comedian returns for GM16 (along with Beat This!) and the skilful self-deprecation of Angela Barnes.

 There’s something unsettling about Julia Holter’s musical presence. Perhaps it’s her frequent use of polyrhythms – the melody and instrumental dance around each other, each one hauntingly beautiful, but seemingly oblivious to the other. Or maybe, in a landscape in which female musicians are required to be warm and accessible, it’s the slightly detached tone with which she communicates between songs.”Here’s a really old song,” she deadpans. “Really old. From, like, 2010 or something.” The audience laughs, though no-one’s sure whether she’s joking or not, and she doesn’t crack a smile. Frequently, she goes through the motions of tying her hair up, piling it on top of her head and twisting it around itself, before letting it fall back down again as if she’s changed her mind. Everything about tonight is slightly off-kilter, deliberately out of step with itself. And it’s fascinating to watch.