Posts Tagged ‘I Gemini’

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The duo behind British electropop group Let’s Eat Grandma were just 17 when its debut, I, Gemini, came out two years ago to wide acclaim. Lifelong friends Rosa Walton and Jenny Hollingsworth found themselves thrown into the spotlight, and the upcoming I’m All Ears reflects that transformative experience. Hooky early singles “Falling Into Me” and “It’s Not Just Me” feel wider in scope than the group’s earlier work, with layers of synthesizers and sounds reflecting their increased ambition. It also helps to have producers like Sophie (Madonna, Charli XCX), David Wrench (The xx, Frank Ocean), and Faris Badwan (The Horrors), which should make I’m All Ears a big step forward for the duo.

Let’s Eat Grandma – It’s Not Just Me (Official Video) The song will be on our second album ‘I’m All Ears’ which is coming out 29th June 2018,

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#U.K. pop duo Let’s Eat Grandma released their debut album I, Gemini in 2016, when members Jenny Hollingworth and Rosa Walton were just 17 years old. Today, they return with “Hot Pink” their first new song since. On their latest, the pair collaborated with an artist whose pop sensibility is as singular as theirs: producer, solo artist, and PC Music affiliate Sophie. “Hot Pink” retains Hollingworth and Walton’s yearning harmonies and quirky lyrics, while Sophie makes her presence known with airy synthesizers and a thundering, spluttering chorus.

According to Let’s Eat Grandma, “‘Hot Pink’ is about the misconceptions of femininity and masculinity and the power of embracing both of them. It’s about self-expression and appreciation for an underrated colour.”

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That Let’s Eat Grandma’s debut album I, Gemini should feature among our favourites of the year list , We’ve been fans and supporters since their first track appeared on youtube and their appearance on Jools Holland was also a music highlights of 2016.

Their music isn’t for everyone but the best thing is, we really don’t think they care. Rosa and Jenny make a sound that is inventive, imaginative and entirely different to pretty much anything else out there right now. They make music for themselves, please themselves and to entertain themselves. It’s not really commercial – it’s not pop by numbers, it’s not landfill indie, it is simply the imagination and musicality of two incredibly talented teenagers left to run wild, and the results are magnificent.

Many of the tunes are pretty much the same as they were a couple of years ago, before the industry was aware of them and before their debut Latitude appearance became a thing of legendary gigs. A tip of the hat to Transgressive Records then for letting the pair be themselves and not trying to add significant amounts of polish or control to a sound that is at its best when it is left to just be whatever the girls want it to be.

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Two lookalike freaky kids who made one of the most lush, organic songs of the year in 2015, the mesmerising track Deep Six Textbook. Their music is as icy as PJ Harvey and as random as Bjork or Dean Blunt, arriving complete with coordinated handclaps, sax solos, wilfully obscure lyrics and jaw-dropping harmonies. There’s something a bit creepy about Let’s Eat Grandma. Their name, for starters. But their eerie childlike vocals matched with a quirky psych tinged, folk sound but with hints of electronica, shouldn’t really work. Yet it does. And the result of I, Gemini is one of the most catchy new records of the year. The teenage Norwich duo are instantly likeable and the ideas involved in their debut record hint at a very bright future.

That Let’s Eat Grandma’s debut album I, Gemini should feature on our favourites of the year list should come as no surprise to regular readers. We’ve been fans and supporters since way back when and their appearance on Jools Holland was one of our personal music highlights of 2016.

Their music isn’t for everyone but the best thing is, we really don’t think they care. In fact, we’d wager that all the critics, bloggers and armchair opinioners take it all a lot more seriously than Rosa and Jenny do. Their sound is inventive, imaginative and entirely different to pretty much anything else out there right now. They make music for themselves, please themselves and to entertain themselves. It’s not really commercial – it’s not pop by numbers, it’s not landfill indie, it’s not even punk (though some will say it is) – it is simply the imagination and musicality of two incredibly talented teenagers left to run wild, and the results are magnificent.

Many of the tunes are pretty much the same as they were a couple of years ago, before the industry was aware of them and before their debut Latitude appearance (on the tiny Inbetweeners stage) became a thing of legend. A tip of the hat to Transgressive then for letting the pair be themselves and not trying to add significant amounts of polish or control to a sound that is at its best when it is left to just be whatever the girls want it to be.

<em>I, Gemini</em> by Let’s Eat Grandma

A short time ago, Let’s Eat Grandma dressed up in baby costumes and crawled round London, and the resulting video for Sax In The City is one we’ve been itching to have out in the world. There’s a school of thought that it’s no longer possible to create anything original with pop music. With their debut I, Gemini, Let’s Eat Grandma make nonsense of such an idea. Over its ten songs teenagers Jenny Hollingworth and Rosa Walton create a world entirely of their own making. What’s also remarkable is that whilst the music is constantly expansive – they sound like they’re backed by an orchestra at times – the pair played all of the instruments, including brass, woodwind, keys, drums and guitars, themselves.

“Just us at our favourite place, wearing our favourite colour, doing what we do best – this is the most real video of Let’s Eat Grandma yet. PS Look out for the rat.” – Rosa and Jenny

The song appears on their debut album I, Gemini, available through all good music stores.

Let’s Eat Grandma are also on tour over the next few months.

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Lo fi pop duo Let’s Eat Grandma have shared a video for their single, “Sax in the City”.

One of the standout tracks from their debut album “I, Gemini”, “Sax in the City” documents a dystopian nightmare as people are rendered robot slaves by smartphones and tablets.

Director Ben Sommers, who also filmed the band’s recent “Eat Shiitake Mushrooms” video, says the following: “We intended to keep the video quite lighthearted and playful, with Jenny and Rosa as babies crawling through the busy city landscape – we also wanted to make a subtle comment on social and political issues – the outcome a slight nod to Orwell’s 1984 and how true his novel is seemingly becoming. The baby aspect adds something quite bizarre to the video, I think it echoes the eclectic and psychedelic nature of Let’s Eat Grandma’s sound – but also gestures something worryingly poignant in respect to the world that future generations are growing up in.”

Band members Rosa Walton and Jenny Hollingworth add: “Just us at our favourite place, wearing our favourite colour, doing what we do best – this is the most real video of Let’s Eat Grandma yet. PS Look out for the rat.”

The debut album from Let’s Eat Grandma ‘I, Gemini’ is out now:

Guardian Guide exclusive - Let’s Eat Grandma

Let’s Eat Grandma perform Deep Six Textbook on Later… with Jools Holland, BBC Two (18 October 2016). Experimental pop outfit Let’s Eat Grandma, as one of the most chattered-about new acts of 2016, the pair have been hard at work on their brilliant and strange debut album I, Gemini (and if you think it’s precocious to be putting out a record at 17, they actually recorded most of it two years ago). Joined by helium-high vocals, clapping-game percussion and lyrics about baking cakes, much of their collection of weird pop has a creepy, childlike glaze. It’s a mood compounded by their eerie live shows, in which they glower, do deadpan dance routines and utilise their Rapunzel-length hair by draping it over their faces.