Posts Tagged ‘Heavy Meta’

Stardust Birthday Party is about human evolution. Specifically, one humans evolution: mine, Ron Gallo. That’s the name my parents gave me. At one point, I was a very lost mid-twenties person living in Philadelphia, in a relationship with someone struggling with mental health issues and crippling heroin addiction. I was asleep. I didn’t know how to handle my life. I was also writing songs for Heavy Meta – my “frustrated with humanity” album. I laugh about it all now, but at the time it all felt like an absolute nightmare. It was the perfect doorway to look inside the place I’d been avoiding forever: myself.

Stardust Birthday Party is about what is happening underneath all of this life stuff. My path inward. The details of my path are pointless because everyone’s path is different. It is about me sitting with myself for the first time and confronting the big question “WHAT AM I, REALLY?” It’s about the love and compassion for all things that enters when you find out you are nothing and everything. I think at one point I wanted to change the world, but now I know I can only change myself, or rather just strip away everything that is not me to reveal the only thing that’s ever been there. And that’s what this album is about, it’s me dancing while destroying the person I thought I was, and hopefully forever.

In the liner notes of John Coltrane’s album A Love Supreme (which we pay tribute to on this album) he wrote: “During the year 1957, I experienced, by the grace of God, a spiritual awakening which was to lead me to a richer, fuller, more productive life. At that time, in gratitude, I humbly asked to be given the means and privilege to make others happy through music.” That’s it. That is the pure essence of creativity. Someone embodying what they have realized about themselves and the world that surrounds them. That is why this album exists. Thank you for letting me share this with you. Ron Gallo.

Ron Gallo’s  debut LP Heavy Meta was released toward the very beginning of 2017, making it easy to forget that its opening cut, “Young Lady, You’re Scaring Me” was one of the most electrifying songs of the year. Gallo combines balls-to-the-wall garage psych with the kind of social anger and biting snark that keeps getting him compared to a young Bob Dylan (the voluminous ‘fro helps too.) The bitter humor of “Why Do You Have Kids?” and “All the Punks Are Domesticated” show there’re some real brains behind all the fuzzed-out brawn, while the stellar stand-alone singles he released last month (“Temporary Slave” “Sorry Not Everybody Is You”), have us hopeful he’s not slowing down anytime soon. it’s a classic album.

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Ron Gallo is delightfully hard to figure out. He takes the free-spirited, anti-capitalist ethos of 60s rock and mixes it with what the Black Keys think they sound like ,His lyrics are incessantly entertaining, making it almost OK that he named his debut LP HEAVY META. On album opener “Young Lady, You’re Scaring Me,” Gallo sings, “Let’s get a house, you and me and your 12 cats.” His delivery is sneeringly reminiscent of Dylan, singing such lines with a sincerity and confidence, as if the listener is crazy for smirking at this shack with a dozen cats. He should scan as annoying, but there’s something deliriously charming about this fractured soul spelling out the ills of humanity one song at a time.

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The Philly born, now Nashville-based songwriter first emerged with the modern Americana/folk band, Toy Soldiers, before leaving Pennsylvania for the warm grasp of country music’s capitol, introducing the city to a defiantly unsatisfied debutante, eager to take you out to lunch and then spit in your face because your politics are wack. Gallo has this innate ability—a tremendously tricky skill to hone to dose his songs with humour, all the while lacing them with scathing social commentaries and a level of depth most garage rock acts never reach, let alone aim for. On Heavy Meta, Gallo proved that he’s just a wiser and sharper songwriter than most people doing it. That trend continues on “It’s All Gonna Be OK,” the first single from Gallo’s forthcoming LP, Stardust Birthday Party, out October 5th via New West.

“It’s All Gonna Be OK,” is nervous and twitchy, hallucinatory and repetitive with its scratchy and fidgeting guitar parts, until Gallo, sensing the growing unease, sings, “It’s all gonna be OK.” Good to know. Gallo rattles off all of the shit tearing us apart before easing us with his oddly placating aphorism. Gallo’s philosophy comes as a sort of self-medication, as he tries to convince himself that this broken world can get better, Gallo works his way through insecurities and finds this blind faith to be comforting. He tells us:

it’s all gonna be OK, no matter what it is, because all feeling, thought and experience is temporary. could be in one second or 20 years but, to trust that it’s all going exactly as it should, is true and liberating. i like to remind myself of this often and figured might as well share this thought with others via a mostly one chord song featuring my trumpet debut heard in the outro of the song. it’s all gonna be OK is the main message, and “stardust birthday party” is me explaining WHY? from my own experience looking inside.

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The RON GALLO III is a rock and roll trio lead by a tall, big-haired weirdo of the same name. As the former frontman of Toy Soldiers, Gallo spent a decade as a fixture in the burgeoning Philadelphia music scene. Now solo, Gallo has completed his second full-length record “Heavy Meta”. Embracing his love for fuzz, psych, garage, and early punk, Heavy Meta is a stark contrast to the “Harry Nilsson-meets-Father John Misty” sound of the previous record RONNY. After undergoing a shattering year of love, loss, purging, and a musical reinvention, Gallo sought a change of scenery and a fresh start.

Drawn to the rock ‘n’ roll music currently being made by his friends in back alleys of Tennessee’s “Music City,” Gallo and his very own record label American Diamond Recordings relocated to the Bordeaux neighborhood of Nashville on New Years Day 2016. Throughout his career, Toy Soldiers and solo combined, Gallo has released three full length records and three EPs working with various small independent labels in Philadelphia and New York City. He has shared the stage with legends such as Wanda Jackson, Dr. Dog, Deer Tick, Dr. John, The Walkmen, J. Roddy Walston, among others. Gallo has previously been featured among USA Today’s “Bands to Watch,” Paste Magazine’s “Philly Bands You Should Listen to NOW” and has garnered appearances on PBS SUN Studio Special, Daytrotter, Audiotree, and many more. On stage, Gallo is a huge force to be reckoned with. He is a true showman with a knack for grabbing the audience’s attention and leaving them in awe. He sings his ass off and thinks it’s important to laugh at yourself.

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The video for “Really Nice Guys” it’s technically a song about people in bands who are fine but are way better at not being a musician. “Really Nice Guys” is the latest single from Ron Gallo’s upcoming EP of the same name. The whole EP is a sarcastic, literal response to people telling Gallo to write what he knows, but also pokes fun at Gallo himself. It follows Gallo’s most recent release, Heavy Meta, which was released earlier this year on New West Records.

When asked to provide a little background about the video for this, Gallo said: “The song is about bands that are better at being humans than making music. So the video, modeled after an early 2000’s skateboarding video part, is me, to the best of my ability, being bad or at very best underwhelming at skating synced to the song.” Meta, man! Like Father John Misty with a skateboard.

Really Nice Guys is out January 19th, 2018 via New West Records.

From the new EP ‘Really Nice Guys,’ available January 19th.

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A few words from Ron Gallo “Heavy Meta” is 11 tracks of lyrical confrontation and laughter for cynics laid down roughly on a bed of fuzz, chaotic structures and primal sounds evoked from a red Fender jaguar electric guitar – there is bass, there are drums and not much else besides the occasional icing (no artificial colors or dyes). It’s not comfortable and easily pinpointed and I’m sure that will create an issue for the desire for neat little boxes we have grown to love. I still don’t know what I’m doing and I plan on keeping it that way. Besides a couple of years of emotional and mental turmoil, loss, confusion, breakdown and internal growth what did all of that ever get me? Well, it gave me this record called “HEAVY META” and it is the first few findings from my guerilla treasure hunt for bullshit, both outside and within. Ethos meets pathos. The only thing I do know is that I want to use music to reflect the times and as a primary outlet for me to become a total psychopath on stage, challenge myself and talk about potentially heavy real world things, call you out, then maybe we can even hug after the show. I am forever grateful for this life and anyone that ever comes to a show, buys a record and wants to have a real conversation. I have no idea where things are going, but I know it’s best to grow with them and be okay with whatever happens. As for right now, it seems like a great time to wake up, put all of ourselves into it, acknowledge our own personal limitless value and beauty and if I can be any part in that, well then, awesome. Just the existence of a biography in someway makes it seem like my life is more interesting than your life .

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Cradling a “Purple Haze” smoothie outside The Post East cafe in East Nashville, Ron Gallo is talking about the tortured relationship that spurred him to write and record one of the year’s most searing and unfiltered alt-rock albums, Heavy Meta. “Loving somebody that is outside your realm of understanding is a pretty earth-shattering thing,” says Gallo, 29.

In 2013, around the time a burned-out Gallo decided to leave Toy Soldiers, the band he’d fronted for eight years, he entered into a two-year relationship with a woman who struggled with mental-health and drug-addiction issues. “It was a pretty dark time –not all of it — but, god, it was a heavy situation. I was frustrated and pissed off with humanity,” says Gallo adding,  I had met a girl that I was with for a few years. and that relationship was a real learning experience in a lot of ways. I started writing this record — a lot of the songs on it are two or three years old now  and then things really got bad, to the point where she had to go away. So there I was in Philly — I’d been there for 10 years at this point — and I was like, if I stay here for one more week, I’m going to blow my head off. “Through the course of that relationship a lot of Heavy Meta was written.”

For someone not yet 30 who describes his upbringing in the Philadelphia area as “pretty basic, middle class suburban” — albeit colored by the divorce of his parents during his early teens — the lyrics that Gallo wrote for Heavy Meta sounded like the work of a man much older and irreparably world weary.

On Heavy Meta, he levels his jaundiced eye at the parents of unwanted children in “Why Do You Have Kids?”; dysfunctional relationships in “Young Lady Your’re Scaring Me” (a No. 30 hit on Billboards Adult Alternative Songs chart); Big Pharma in “Kill The Medicine Man”; and dead marriages in “Put The Kids to Bed”, Gallo’s latest single and video,

Spiked with surf and psychobilly guitar lines and feral hoots that would be home on Bruce Springsteen’s Nebraska album, the music on Heavy Meta is often as catchy and cathartic as the lyrics are dark — and the songs were made to be played live. In between a schedule that will see him and his band play 24 dates between Sept. 24 and Nov. 21, His path to Heavy Meta and how his worldview, but not his music, has changed dramatically since he wrote those songs. Just as abruptly as his ex-girlfriend dropped out of his life, she resurfaced months later — and rocked Gallo’s world once again.

Former Philadelphian and now based in Nashville  Ron Gallo is on the cusp of releasing his new album “Heavy Meta”, a top notch set of tracks that touch on the singer-songwriter’s frustrations with humanity and the difficulties he’s faced over the last few years. In anticipation of the big release, Gallo has dropped a new video for his track “Kill the Medicine Man,” which you can watch just below.

“As we enter into this new chapter in America, I have this to say: the government has nothing to do with your decision to self-destruct, consume garbage, or not feed your brain and soul and become the best you,” says Gallo. “The president has no control over how you treat people, contribute or look within. Sorry about all the responsibility, but now is a good time to take it! It’s beautiful! I love you. We don’t need Any leaders, we need a new mind, a new way of thinking. We are capable of that transformation. We need to stay sharp! Drop everything else and try out our new product during these times

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Ron Gallo is a rock and roll trio lead by a tall, big-haired weirdo of the same name. As the former frontman of Toy Soldiers, Gallo spent a decade as a fixture in the burgeoning Philadelphia music scene. Now solo, Gallo is completing his second full-length record “Heavy Meta”. Embracing his love for fuzz, psych, garage, and early punk, Heavy Meta is a stark contrast to the “Harry Nilsson-meets-Father John Misty” sound of the previous record RONNY.

After undergoing a shattering year of love, loss, purging, and a musical reinvention, Gallo sought a change of scenery and a fresh start. Drawn to the rock ‘n’ roll music currently being made by his friends in back alleys of Tennessee’s “Music City,” Gallo and his very own record label American Diamond Recordings relocated to the Bordeaux neighborhood of Nashville on New Years Day 2016.

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Throughout his career, Toy Soldiers and solo combined, Gallo has released three full length records and three EPs working with various small independent labels in Philadelphia and New York City. He has shared the stage with legends such as Wanda Jackson, Dr. Dog, Deer Tick, Dr. John, The Walkmen, J. Roddy Walston, among others. Gallo has previously been featured among USA Today’s “Bands to Watch,” Paste Magazine’s “Philly Bands You Should Listen to NOW” and has garnered appearances on PBS SUN Studio Special, Daytrotter, Audiotree, and many more.

On stage, Gallo is a force to be reckoned with. He is a true showman with a knack for grabbing the audience’s attention and leaving them in awe. He sings his ass off and thinks it’s important to laugh at yourself.

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