Posts Tagged ‘Angel Olsen’

Image may contain: 3 people

The descent into darkness is a trope we find time again across history, literature and film. But there’s also an abyss above. There’s a winding white staircase that goes ever upward into the great unknown – each step, each turn, requiring a greater boldness and confidence than the one before. This is the journey on which we find Angel Olsen. The singer-songwriter’s artistic beginnings as a collaborator shifted seamlessly to her magnificent, cryptic-to-cosmic solo work, and then she formed bands to play her songs, and her stages and audiences grew exponentially. But all along, Angel Olsen was more concerned with a different kind of path, and on her vulnerable, new album, “All Mirrors”, we can see her taking an introspective deep dive towards internal destinations and revelations. In the process of making this album, she found a new sound and voice, a blast of fury mixed with hard won self-acceptance.

By her usually prolific standards, it’s been a long time between albums for Angel Olsen. “All Mirrors” is her first album for three years – an epic gap given that she used to average an LP a year in the early stage of her career. As usual, Olsen has redefined her sound once more, offering up impassioned songs that come backed by bold, wall of sound style production from John Congleton.

There are many moments of stirring intensity, where swirling strings, eccentric electronics and low-slung indie-rock grooves join forces to create stunning and arresting musical works of art. The more contemplative moments often sound a little like “Mezzanine”-era Massive Attack or Portishead, though Olsen’s voice and Congleton’s production are always unique enough to make comparisons with those bands moot.

The mid-album ballad, “Spring.” Over warm, gently warped piano, Olsen opens with advice: “Don’t take it for granted, love when you have it,” she singe, before observing almost in passing how quickly time flies: “Remember when we said we’d never have children, I’m holding your baby now that we’re older.”

For anyone who’s ever invested too heavily in a hypothetical future, or mentally broken apart every minuscule bit of a fresh and failed romance, that lyric can be a terrifying reminder that we will never know what will happen next. Olsen says as much in the next few lines: “I’m beginning to wonder if anything’s real, guess we’re just at the mercy of the way that we feel.”

Her message never veers into existential-panic territory, though, instead held steady by the song’s even-paced, rolling rhythm, and Olsen’s fuzzy vocals, hovering like a reassuring guide. She ends her gentle journey on the only piece of certainty she has access to: the fragile and fleeting present. “So give me some heaven, just for a while,” she sings, before her falsetto takes off into the heavens: “Make it eternal, there in your smile.”

“Spring” is the song that stayed with me the longest, through my dozens upon dozens of replays lying in my darkened bedroom, cooking with my roommates in my kitchen, singing by myself in the shower, like a forever-looping Twilight Zone-ish theme song. There is no true rhyme or reason to anything; there are just things that happen to us and people we meet, and we should try to enjoy everything while it lasts. It may not be a satisfactory revelation and — don’t get me wrong — it will emotionally wreck you. But once the tides of perpetual uncertainty subside, it’ll feel quite freeing.

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, closeup and text

Angel Olsen is a master of shifting our perception of her. Each one of her albums has been a sweeping evolution—sonic, musical, conceptual—that has made its predecessor seem humble by comparison. “All Mirrors,” is the title track of her upcoming fourth album, immediately sounds bigger than anything she’s done before. Initial listens will leave you overwhelmed by the string arrangement: an ominous, heroic swell over a synthy pulse, the troubled waters that connect the song’s two parts.

Some of Olsen’s songs feel like they’ve always existed—lost country standards or themes from old romantic films—but “All Mirrors” is mostly alien. She centers its movement on just one vocal melody, loosening and intensifying her delivery as if holding onto something delicate in a windstorm. Even her one-of-a-kind voice, the constant through her work, gets coated in silvery new effects.

Underneath all these layers is a deceptively stark composition, a plea for consistency whose cryptic lyrics seem to be carved out of a larger story. In the accompanying video, with imagery that falls between Greek myth and science fiction, Olsen succumbs to a void of demonic hands, undergoes a transformation, and locks eyes with a crowned doppelgänger in some smoky purgatory. She alludes to all these selves in the chorus, describing her reflection as something constantly changing, in danger of disappearing completely: “At least at times it knew me,” she sings, face-to-face with the mystery.

“All Mirrors” by Angel Olsen from ‘All Mirrors’ out October 4th on Jagjaguwar Records.

Marissa Nadler: <i>For My Crimes</i> Review

Marissa Nadler is comfortably the most consistent folk artist plucking an acoustic guitar right now. With eight studio albums in 14 years—not a dud among them—plus a number of self-released records, EPs, guest spots, and compilation appearances, she boasts the super prolific output of studio-loitering rappers, productive paperback writers, or Samuel L. Jackson. But For My Crimes might well be the best record in her saintly catalog. After the heavier, post-rock atmospherics of her fine 2016 release Strangers, Nadler opts for a more stripped-down ethos.

Maybe this is a wild misreading, but Marissa Nadler doesn’t get nearly enough credit—or any at all, really—for having a sense of humour. Her wit is as dry as it as subtle on her eighth album, a collection of songs that are also disconsolate and foreboding. Those traits are how the Boston singer is more generally known, and for good enough reason: Nadler favors a harrowing folk sound that she calls “slow music,” full of spectral, minor-key musical arrangements that emphasize guitars, piano and strings. She rarely uses drums, which sometimes gives the impression that her songs are untethered to anything more than her voice.

Nadler’s vocals are at once soft and steely on lyrics with a poetic, sometimes gothic streak. It’s a very intentional, stylized approach, which makes her flashes of wit all the more startling. Yet there’s a droll undertone to parts of For My Crimes. On “All Out of Catastrophes,” Nadler ratchets up the melodrama to teetering heights, and when her lover mumbles another woman’s name in his sleep, she breaks the tension by observing, “It was the nicest thing you said.” She mentions someone wanting to fake his death “again” on the quietly poppy “Flamethrower,” and offers a skeptical rebuke in the title of “Are You Really Gonna Move to the South?” It’s sensual and melancholy, and Nadler’s voice floats atop finger picked acoustic guitar and an aching high harmony part.

http://

There are darker themes on For My Crimes. Nadler sings the title track from the perspective of a death row inmate pleading to not be remembered for his transgressions. Her vocals are calm and matter-of-fact, and Angel Olsen contributes a harmony part mixed far enough back that it hovers like a shadow. “I Can’t Listen to Gene Clark Anymore” captures the feeling of swearing off a favorite singer whose music dredges up once-fond memories, with trebly electric guitar strumming, sad, spiraling violins and plus vocals from Sharon Van Etten. Album closer “Say Goodbye to That Car” is unexpectedly poignant as Nadler thinks back on her associations with the old beater, and turns the odometer reading into a hypnotic refrain over a spare guitar part. The riff on “Blue Vapor” strains against the limits of the song, injecting a sense of urgency, while Nadler and guest Kristin Kontrol of Dum Dum Girls send their voices spiraling upward, alternately intertwining and tangling. It’s perhaps the most forceful moment on an album built on understated power, evocative lyrics and Nadler’s lithe voice—and, just maybe, a hint or two of sly humor.

The eighth album from Marissa Nadler, “For My Crimes”, is the sound of turmoil giving way to truth. The songs stare down the dark realization that love may not be enough to keep two people together through distance and differing needs. By asking these difficult questions about her relationships, Nadler has found a stronger sense of self and a sharper voice as both a songwriter and a vocalist, culminating in her most evocative entry in an already impressive discography. The album is set for release on September 28th, via Bella Union and Sacred Bones.

Following the release of 2016’s acclaimed Strangers, Nadler’s relationships were put to the test as she left the Boston area on tour. She wrote throughout 2017 about this tension, and ended up with three times as many songs as she needed. But after reviewing the demos with her co-producers Justin Raisen and Lawrence Rothman, Nadler wrote a flurry of tight but no less intense new songs in the week before arriving at Rothman’s Laurel Canyon studio, House of Lux, in early January. She considered it a challenge to herself, applying new strategies and structures to the craft of “slow music” she’s honed over the last 15 years. From that group of songs came nearly all of the singles on For My Crimes, some of the most indelible of Nadler’s career.

The opening title track is classic Nadler: a sweeping, vaguely Southern drama of voices, strings, and acoustic guitar, that walks the fine line between character song and personal indictment by metaphor. “For My Crimes” spawned out of a songwriting exercise in which Nadler wrote from the perspective of someone on death row, but the song casts a dark shadow over an album that turns marital conflict into inner reflection. Helping Nadler dig down into the song’s remorseful soul is her old friend Angel Olsen, who serves as a distraught echo from beyond in the chorus.

“Blue Vapor” has an intoxicating raw energy luring you in, somewhere between Springsteen and a grunge band playing MTV Unplugged back in the day. It feels at once tight and improvisational, balancing on little more than Nadler’s steady strumming and vulnerable harmonies with Kristin Kontrol (of Dum Dum Girls), until the heavy, purposeful style of Hole drummer Patty Schemel conjures chaos in the second half. This slow burn feeling is all too appropriate for a song centered around repeating patterns and creeping numbness in a relationship. “Blue Vapor” names that strange ambivalence and turns it into a chant that hangs in the air long after the song ends.

Dreaminess and eeriness have often been two sides of the same coin in Marissa Nadler songs. Where “For My Crimes” and “Blue Vapor” come from her dark side, the album has plenty of moments that twinkle in their sadness and sentimentality. “I Can’t Listen to Gene Clark Anymore” is one of those highly specific songs you’ll get if you’ve ever lost a favorite band to your own broken heart. It sways perfectly in its bittersweetness, like a slow dance you never want to end. After the strings swell and the bass pedals kick in, Nadler coos, “Cause I remember/The songs you sang/To me when it was you/I was falling for.”

Later, closing track “Said Goodbye To That Car” turns a final odometer reading into a rhythm for a catchy, wistful hook: “1-1-9-6-5-7, and the engine blew/“1-1-9-6-5-7, and I thought of you,” Nadler lulls, harmonizing with herself. It’s an ingenious way to capture the end of an era in one small moment, and she moves as delicately as you would handling an old photo with her sweet oohs.

Bolstering the intimacy of these songs is the strong feminine energy that defined their recording. Between Rothman’s fluidity with both gender and genre (as heard on his 2017 album The Book of Law), and Raisen’s track record of successful collaborations with strong women (Olsen, Kim Gordon, Charli XCX), Nadler felt empowered to explore without judgement in the studio. With the exception of a single saxophonist, every player on the album is a woman of notable pedigree and distinct style, many of whom have played with Nadler over the years. In addition to the cameos by Angel Olsen and Kristin Kontrol, Sharon Van Etten sings backup on “I Can’t Listen to Gene Clark Anymore” and “Lover Release Me.” Mary Lattimore joins on harp for “Are You Really Gonna Move to the South,” while the great experimental multi-instrumentalist Janel Leppin plays strings throughout the record.

These women and others helped make For My Crimes as dynamic as it is intimate, but Nadler’s mesmerizing voice stripped of nearly all reverb  is what sits at the center of these songs. You can hear the emotional range of her performances more than ever before, from the spectral harmonizing of “Are You Really Gonna Move To The South” to the cheeky boredom of “All Out Of Catastrophes,” two other highlights. As a singer, she has never sounded more confident than she does here.

Adding to the album’s deeply personal feeling is its abstracted artwork, featuring Nadler’s original oil paintings. Though Nadler is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design and a semi-retired art teacher (she has one student left a 95-year-old named Doris), For My Crimes marks the first album cover bearing one of her paintings. She also channeled the album’s themes into paintings corresponding to specific tracks, which will be included as prints in the limited edition version of For My Crimes (and in some cases, for sale as originals on Nadler’s website).

http://

releases September 28th, 2018

Image may contain: text

This single follows his acclaimed 2016 collaborative album ‘I Had A Dream That You Were Mine’ a collaboration with ex-Vampire Weekend multi-instrumentalist Rostam. 

Hamilton Leithauser has shared his new single ‘Heartstruck (Wild Hunger)’, another collaboration but now with Angel Olsen,  The song is Leithauser’s first new music since the release of ‘I Had A Dream That You Were Mine’ 

Leithauser has once again sought out a collaborator for his latest track, with the former Walkmen frontman this time pairing up with Angel Olsen for the new song. Speaking about the track, Leithauser said: “This song is about catching yourself off guard when an emotion hits a little harder than you were ready for. It’s a desperate and funny situation. The desperation can be a little bit ridiculous, which can be a little bit funny, but it’s also desperate, so it’s agonising.

“I thought ‘Wild Hunger’ should be delivered with huge passion and energy, and I needed a fierce and booming voice as a counterbalance. Luckily, I got my first choice: Angel Olsen.” “Heartstruck (Wild Hunger)” is a new Hamilton Leithauser single that I duet on.

A1093100952 16

Whitney  –  Light Upon The Lake: Demo Recordings

Light Upon The Lake’, the debut from Whitney, was born from early-morning songwriting sessions during one of the most brutal winters in Chicago’s history. Vocalist / drummer Julien Ehrlich and guitarist Max Kakacek began writing unflinching, honest songs about everything from breakups to the passing of Ehrlich’s grandfather. The pair leaned on one another for both honest critique and a sounding board for working through their newly-discovered truths.

The brief, intense period of creativity for the band yielded ‘Light Upon The Lake’s exceptional, unfussy combination of soul, breezy Sixties / Seventies rock and sombre heartbreak woven together by hopeful, golden threads. After critical acclaim and nearly nonstop touring since the album’s 2016 release, Ehrlich and Kakacek are going back to their roots – for the first time, the full demos from ‘Light Upon The Lake’ will be made available. After a whirlwind year following the debut, the demos offer a way for listeners to get a glimpse into the very beginning of Whitney’s sound.

“After almost two years of non-stop touring, we decided we wanted to close the chapter on ‘Light Upon The Lake’ by releasing the songs in their earliest incarnations alongside a cover of a band favorite by Alan Toussaint, and an unreleased track called ‘You and Me’. We’re looking towards LP2 as we finish out the year on the road.”

Num200

Husker Du – Savage Young Du

Experience the punishing sonic origins of a punk icon. Collected here for the first time, and skillfully remastered from original board tapes, demos, and session masters, this collection is an authoritative chronicling of the wellspring and maturation of Grant Hart, Greg Norton and Bob Mould – three St. Paul teenagers who’d go on to become the most heralded trio of the American punk underground. Follow the Hüskers to their earliest gigs in 1979, through extensive road dog touring, and to the start of their partnership with West Coast tastemaker SST Records in 1983 via a massive hardbound book crammed full of photos, flyers, and a sprawling essay with participation from the band. 47 of the 69 songs compiled here are previously unissued, and includes In A Free Land, Everything Falls Apart , and an alternate version Land Speed Record.

3CD – Three CD Remastered Set housed in Die Cut Sleeves. Comes with 144 Page Booklet with 40 previously unpublished photographs and 12,000 word essay by Erin Osmon.

4LP – Four LP Remastered Set housed in Tip on Sleeves. Comes with 108 Page Booklet with 40 previously unpublished photographs and 12,000 word essay by Erin Osmon.

Rog stooges hftfhs lp jacket cover 1500px

The Stooges  – Highlights From The Fun House Sessions

1970: The Complete Fun House Sessions was recorded at Elektra Sound Recorders in Los Angeles and compiled from all thirteen reels of multi-track tape that held every note and snippet of studio dialogue. Twelve reels of tape were used during the original sessions, with the thirteenth reel having the takes that would be used on the studio album. This sprawling set which was originally aimed at the collector market would be challenging and cost prohibitive to reissue as a multi-disc vinyl box set. What is presented here is an attempt to assemble some of the best highlights from the Fun House Sessions on an officially-released 2LP set in high quality packaging with a sequence that hopefully proves to be an easier, and more casual listen. Included are some terrific alternate versions of Down on the Street, Loose, Dirt, Funhouse ,1970 and others, pulled from session reels 1, 4,6, 7, 9 & 11 and originally recorded on May 11,12, 15, 18, 21 & 25 of 1970. Also notable is the inclusion of the 17+ minute-version of L.A. Blues, titled as “Freak,” which encompasses the entire fourth side of this set and is the prime example of what makes the Funhouse Sessions both loved and feared simultaneously.

Jag314.ao.bsides.fc.1600

Angel Olsen –  Phases

Angel Olsen releases Phases, a collection of B-sides, rarities, and demos from the past several years, including a number of never-before released tracks, via Jagjaguwar. Balancing tenacity and tenderness, Phases acts as a deep-dive for longtime fans, as well as a fitting introduction to Olsen’s sprawling sonics for the uninitiated. Fly On Your Wall, previously contributed to the online-only, anti-Trump fundraiser Our First 100 Days, opens Phases, before seamlessly slipping into Special, a brand new song from the My Woman recording sessions. Both How Many Disasters and Sans are first-time listens: home-recorded demos that have never been released, leaning heavily on Olsen’s arresting croon and lonesome guitar. The B-sides compilation is both a testament to Olsen’s enormous musical range and a tidy compilation of tracks that have previously been elusive in one way or another.

LP – Black Vinyl with Download.

Jane weaver

Jane Weaver  –  Modern Kosmology

Modern Kosmology sees Jane Weaver’s melodic-protagonist channeling new depths of creative cosmic energy within. After the huge critical acclaim of 2012’s Fallen By Watchbird, followed by 2015’s exploratory Silver Globe LP winning her unanimous “record of the year accolades” and hefty measures of radio play-listing Jane Weaver’s conceptual trajectory has sent her neo-kosmische penchants to the point of no-return. Jane Weaver’s unwaning yearning for psychoactive pop energy has just reached a new level of magnetism. As snowclones go, Modern Kosmology is the new Silver. Another Spectrum to add to the tension.

CD – Digipack.

LP – Standard LP is standard weight vinyl, black inner and A6 download card.

LP+ – Deluxe LP – 1000 Copies only. Black 180 Gram vinyl, Deluxe metallic foil print sleeve, black inner, 24”x12” fold out poster, A6 download card.

6891232d567c333bca07239c7733c806

Vagabon – Infinite Worlds

Reissue on Marathon of the album that came out earlier this year on Father/Daughter records and was a Pitchfork favourite. Within the songs of Laetitia Tamko there are infinite worlds: emotional spaces that grow wider with time, songs within songs that reveal themselves on each listen. Tamko is a multi-instrumentalist and a producer, recording since 2014 as Vagabon. Her forthcoming debut, Infinite Worlds, builds upon Tamko’s stripped-down demos that have been circulating online and throughout the independent music community for the past two years. Tamko’s songs are embedded with her own story and personal history: growing up in Cameroon, her family’s move to New York and adjusting to culture shock. She grew up around music and loved it, but finishing engineering school was a priority before music could start to feel like a real possibility. To date, Tamko mostly listens to East and West African music nostalgic of her childhood, styles of music that influence her own in subtle ways.

Raincoats 500x500

The Raincoats  –  Fairytale In The Supermarket EP

Limited copies are signed by Ana Da Silva. We ThRee reissue The Raincoats’ legendary first 7” E.P. originally released on Rough Trade Records in April 1979, and has been commercially unavailable since its first release. Fairytale in the Supermarket currently features in Mike Mill’s widely acclaimed and Golden Globes nominated new film 20th CenturyDigitally re-mastered from original masters. Original monoprint sleeve design by Ana da Silva.

Rem double cd 1200x1200 04dfea90 f66b 4d15 a5d9 f33b4ec306d4 1024x1024

R.E.M  – Automatic For The People (25th Anniversary Edition)

Widely considered to be one of the best albums of the 90s, 1992’s Automatic For The People features R.E.M.’s iconic hit singles Nightswimming, Man on the Moon and Everybody Hurts.

2CD – Remastered album plus Live At The 40 Watt Club in a rigid clamshell box with booklet. 4CD – Remastered Deluxe edition boxset features previously unreleased material, including 20 never-before-heard demos, and the previously unreleased tracks Mike’s Pop Song and Devil Rides Backwards. A Blu-ray disc offers the full album (with bonus track Photograph featuring Natalie Merchant) mixed in Dolby Atmos, plus a high-resolution master of the album, music videos, and the original 1992 EPK. Also included is Live At The 40 Watt Club 11/19/92 – a live set performed in R.E.M.’s hometown of Athens, GA.

LP – 180 Gram Heavyweight black vinyl, cut from original analogue tapes at Capitol Studios and download card.

100000x100000 999 1

Ed Tullett and Novo Amor  –  Heiress

After meeting in November 2013, Ed Tullett and Novo Amor (Ali Lacey) quickly began writing to form the basis of what is now “Heiress”, their full-length collaborative record.
Recorded around the release of their two widely lauded collaborative singles (“Faux”, 2014 and “Alps”, 2016), the pair worked sporadically in intense week-long sessions in Cardiff spilling over Lacey’s old and new home-studios, tearing songs down and building them back up again. “Heiress” is noticeably the product of nearly 4 years work – sprawling, ambitious and strikingly deep, it’s a collection of songs both meticulously calculated and deeply felt.

Phases

Angel Olsen’s outtakes collection Phases is out at the end of the week, and today she’s giving us one last peak in the form of “Sans.” It’s a minimal, lo-fi demo, just Olsen’s impassioned voice and a single guitar echoing in the distance, but by now we should all realize that’s all this woman needs to make an impression. Here’s a statement from Olsen:

“Sans” was a song I wrote in between Burn Your Fire and My Woman, something short and simple  but about a big thing in my life: travel and what it can do to the psyche. When you’re out there and you’re working and moving so fast it’s difficult to really imagine a time when you were fully realized and known. You know, it’s hard enough to be known when you’re around! But then there are those people in your life that know you and don’t need you around all the time to be or feel close — I suppose it’s about that too.

Angel Olsen‘Sans’ from Phases out November 10th, 2017 on Jagjaguwar Records

KCRW exclusive! Angel Olsen is a stunning singer-songwriter and she stopped by our studio to preview songs from her forthcoming album “Phases”, out on November 10th. Enjoy this live version of “Sans” and stay tuned for the full session airing on Morning Becomes Eclectic.

Image may contain: 5 people, people smiling, text

Angel Olsen gave us My Woman, one of last year’s best albums, and she’s also got one of the best live shows going right now. Her voice is monstrous, her songs are amazing, and her visual presentation is absolutely on-point; I love the way all the members of her backing band wear matching suits and bolo ties.

“Special” always felt like a band song to me, something to lose track of ourselves in. It didn’t quite fit the rest of the record and was a major deciding factor on whether or not it would mean a double LP. The record came out and I kept thinking about the song and wanting to play it anyway.

My friend came to visit me for a week and I had all these grand ideas about how to make another video. But it’s been a long year of touring and videos and pressure to keep on being important or interesting.
So I woke up the next day and changed my mind, deciding it would be best to just capture the days we were hanging and to occasionally have the camera up. Those days were some of the hardest and also sweetest of the summer. We spent much of the time talking about the current state of affairs and how everyone has been going through tremendous change and having to make hard choices. Maybe it’s just this year, but it feels that we’re entering a new era, one that requires us to really pay more attention to the world and ourselves in it.
What I realized is that going through a hard time and talking about it with friends makes you feel your friendships and who you are, and sometimes it takes a weird year to recognize what you still have.
Watch the Video Below. 

Phases is a collection of Olsen’s work culled from the past several years, including a number of never-before-released tracks. “Fly On Your Wall,” previously contributed to the Bandcamp-only, anti-Trump fundraiser Our First 100 Days, opens Phases, before seamlessly slipping into “Special,” a brand new song from the “MY WOMAN” recording sessions. Both “How Many Disasters” and “Sans” are first-time listens: home-recorded demos that have never been released, leaning heavily on Olsen’s arresting croon and lonesome guitar.

The b-sides compilation is both a testament to Olsen’s enormous musical range and a tidy compilation of tracks that have previously been elusive in one way or another. Balancing tenacity and tenderness, Phases acts as a deep-dive for longtime fans, as well as a fitting introduction to Olsen’s sprawling sonics for the uninitiated.

Angel Olsen’Special’ from Phases out November 10th, 2017 on Jagjaguwar Records

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, text

Angel Olsen has announced the release of Phases, a deep-dive compilation record of unheard and unreleased tracks. Set for release on 10th November, the material on Phases spans recording sessions right from her very first EP, Strange Cacti, up until Olsen’s last album from 2016 album “My Woman”.

You can hear the first tasters of Phases below – check out ‘Special’ and ‘Fly On My Wall’.

Brand new track ‘Special’ is lifted from the My Woman recording sessions and ‘Fly On Your Wall’ was Olsen’s contribution to the Our First 100 Days compilation released in protest of the Trump administration.

Announcing Phases – a collection of B Sides, rarities, and demos including 3 new songs and will be available worldwide November 10th. Pre Order the collection:https://angelolsen.lnk.to/phases And listen to the new songs “Special” and  ‘Fly On Your Wall’ now.

Angel Olsen‘Fly On Your Wall’ from Phases out November 10th, 2017 on Jagjaguwar Records

Angel Olsen – ’Special’ from Phases out November 10th, 2017 on Jagjaguwar Records

Angel Olsen and her band made it clear they’ll be very comfortable opening for Arcade Fire later this year. They began with “High & Wild” from 2014’s “Burn Your Fire For No Witness”, expanding from a roots-rock ramble to a gnarly climax built around a bluesy power chord riff. From there they launched directly into “Shut Up Kiss Me,” a song that grips you as urgently as its subject matter demands, from its bracing rock ‘n’ roll cadence to Olsen’s howling, bellowing, tour-de-force vocal performance. Two more straight-up rockers followed, with “Acrobat,” the hushed intro from Olsen’s 2012 debut “Half Way Home”, serving as a bridge to the set’s less visceral but even more compelling second half.

Olsen spent her last three songs unfurling three tracks from the back half of My Woman in sequence. There was “Sister,” the eight-minute epic that serves as the album’s centerpiece, building slowly from a low-key Roy Orbison-via-Velvet Underground ballad into the kind of glorious guitar symphony I wish Wilco was still writing. There was “Those Were The Days,” a song that imagines what Bonnie Raitt’s attempt at dream-pop might sound like, extended into a beautiful series of peaks and valleys. And there was “Woman,” another eight-minute swoon that begins as a weepy country ballad before going full Joplin and, ultimately, taking its sweet time descending from the mountaintop. These songs gave the audience a chance to sit back and appreciate what Angel Olsen’s band members bring to the table. It’s one thing to burn through some rock songs with power and fury, and it’s quite another to make such lengthy excursions surge and soar.

Angel Olsen performs in Chicago for Pitchfork Music Festival 2017

thanks Stereogum


blackwings666

Horror, Science Fiction, Comic Books and More

hotfox63

IN MEMORY EVERYTHING SEEMS TO HAPPEN TO MUSIC -Tennessee Williams

All Things Thriller

A Celebration of Thrillers, Noire and Black Comedy by Pamela Lowe Saldana

The UK Number Ones Blog

Join me as I listen to every single #1 single!

Mike and Paul's Music Blog

Two Guys In Search of Great Music

A Unique Title For Me

Hoping to make the world more beautiful

A Sound Day

hear ye, hear ye!

Christian's Music Musings

Celebrating music craftsmanship

ECLECTIC MUSIC LOVER

Favorite song lists, reviews, featured indie artists, and music commentary.

Every record tells a story

A Blog About Music, Vinyl, More Music and (Sometimes) Music...

Make Your Own Taste

Eclectic reviews of ambient, psychedelic, post-rock, folk and progressive rock ... etc.!

Martin Crookall - Author For Sale

A transparent attempt to promote a writing career

The Music Aficionado

Quality articles about the golden age of music

J. ERIC SMITH

Slow molasses drip under a tipped-up crescent moon.

THE PRESS | Music Reviews

Click Header to Return Home

Getintothis

Liverpool Music Blog

Born To Listen

to Rock, Country, Blues & Jazz

Blabber 'n' Smoke

A Glasgow view of Americana and related music and writings.

The Music Files

Rewind the Review

If My Records Could Talk

A stroll down memory lane through my music collection

The Fat Angel Sings

the best music of yesterday today and the tomorrow, every era every genre

Fuzzy Sun

Noiserock and heavy psychedelic music

TWELVE INCH

Embracing new and established sounds

%d bloggers like this: