Posts Tagged ‘Missouri’

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On their new album “Problems” their first full-length in eight years The Get Up Kids examine everything from life-changing loss to loneliness to the inevitable anxiety of existing in 2019. But by sustaining the essence of their sound anthemic choruses with sing-along-ready melodies the band highlights those troubles as a shared experience, giving way to an unbreakable solidarity. And at the heart of Problems is an invaluable element the band’s embodied since their 1997 debutFour Minute Mile: a penetrating lyricism that’s both acutely introspective and indelibly resonant.

The follow-up to 2018’s Kicker EP, Problems came to life in Bridgeport, Connecticut, with the band holing up together for a three-week span. Working with Grammy Award-winning producer Peter Katis (Kurt Vile, Japandroids, The National), The Get Up Kids took a characteristically riff-driven yet decidedly pop-minded approach to song structure, while also allowing themselves a new sense of creative freedom. “At one point with this band, if we came up with something that felt too much like when we first started out, we would’ve said, ‘No, we can’t do that anymore,’” says Pryor. “These days we’ve learned how to write without roadblocking the ideas that come naturally to us.”

Kicking off with lead single “Satellite,” Problems opens on a stark arrangement of acoustic guitar and stripped-bare vocals, then bursts into brightly crashing rhythms and lyrics revealing the time-bending quality of The Get Up Kids’ songwriting. “I started writing ‘Satellite’ about my son who’s 14 and a total introvert—not antisocial, he just genuinely likes to keep to himself,” says Pryor. “But then somewhere down the line I started singing about myself—about how even when you’re playing a show to a room full of people, I can still feel anxious and isolated.”

Throughout Problems, The Get Up Kids again prove themselves attuned to the nuance of highly specific emotions, and ultimately validate the messiest and most nebulous of feelings. On the joyfully swinging, piano-heavy “The Problem Is Me,” for instance, the band explores the notion of embracing your own romantic dysfunction, while “Salina” captures a small moment of melancholy with sweeping intensity and sprawling guitar work. Later, on “Your Ghost Is Gone,” The Get Up Kids deliver a gently devastating piano ballad sparked from an instrumental piece Dewees wrote soon after his mother’s death.

Through the years, The Get Up Kids have purposely pushed themselves toward previously unexplored songwriting material. “I’m 41 now, I could never write a song like when I was 19—all those ‘I miss my girlfriend’ kind of songs,” Suptic says. “It’s always important to us to write about wherever we are right now.” As shown on Problems, the resulting output both preserves the beloved spirit of The Get Up Kids and creates an entirely new context for their music. “A big part of the reason why we started writing new songs in the first place is that we have things we want to say about this moment in time,” says Pryor. “We’re still so connected to our past and where this all came from—it’s definitely a celebration of the fact that we still get to do this.”

Band Members
Matt Pryor – Vocals/Guitars
Jim Suptic – Guitar
Rob Pope – Bass
James Dewees – Keyboards
Ryan Pope – Drums
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For the first minute and a half, Nearer My God sounds like a lot of indie music that comes out nowadays. There’s a pulsing synth, electronic handclaps, an R&B-inspired falsetto — you know, the kind of thing you’re basically guaranteed to hear if you turn on Alt Nation or show up to some band’s set at Lollapalooza. And then Conor Murphy screams “I’m Shock Collared At The Gates Of Heaven,” live drums come in, and all of a sudden you’re listening to some of the most crushing post-hardcore to be released this year. It’s a sudden 180, but it’s also the same kind of post-genre experience that many internet-era listeners arrange for themselves anyway. Do you like The Blood Brothers, but also TV on the Radio, but also Radiohead, but also M83, but also Frank Ocean? It’s not that weird to answer yes, and if you did, then Nearer My God is for you.

The level of ambition it takes to pull something like this off, and getting it right nearly destroyed Foxing. But, with help from producer and former Death Cab For Cutie member Chris Walla (who called Nearer My God “one of the bravest and best records I’ve ever been a part of”), they pulled it off like experts. It’s an innovative, risk-taking album that cares about accessible pop appeal as much as it cares about schizophrenic prog-punk fury (“Gameshark”) and long stretches of meditative ambience (“Five Cups”). It’s an album you can rock out to and scream your lungs out to as much as it’s an album you can spend alone time with and really pay attention to the many intricate details.

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It’s less common than it used to be to get indie rock albums with this level of masterful ambition, but it doesn’t feel right to tie this album in with a past era. Nearer My God is looking nowhere but forward, and there’s hardly anything else like it.

FOXING – ” Dealer “

Posted: September 11, 2018 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
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Foxing initially won me over by being such a towering live band (if you haven’t seen them, seriously fix that ASAP), but their second album Dealer went the opposite direction of their shows. It goes into more somber, intimate territory, and it’s the best thing they’ve done yet. The album takes on soaring post-rock, tear-jerking piano ballads, downtempo glitch, melancholic horns and strings, and highly vivid lyrics, all brought together by some of the richest-sounding rock production of the year (courtesy of Minus the Bear/Mastodon producer Matt Bayles).

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It’s an album that stops me in my tracks every time I listen to it, whether it’s Conor Murphy’s gorgeous falsetto or the weight of the keys on “Winding Cloth” or the sudden moments where the band sound twice as large as they are. There’s a certain type of record that comes along every now and then, when an indie band swings for the fences but maintains delicacy and evokes real emotion from the listener. I’m thinking of albums like The Antlers’ Hospice album and self-titled Bon Iver, and now I’d add Dealer to that list too.

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If you’ve ever looked at an old document and noticed brown spots on it, what you are seeing are signs of aging. It’s not exactly clear what specifically causes them, but one day, the page will completely brown over and be no more. This is called foxing.
A group of St. Louis musicians took this idea and turned it into a band. “From the conception of the band, we realized: we’re not gonna be around forever,” says Foxing singer Conor Murphy. “There’s classic literature that over time grows really old. But hopefully, you can make something that meant something at some point and will mean something down the road, even if it is aged and dated.
Foxing’s forthright lyrical honesty paired with their stunning orchestral sound quickly started earning them devoted fans, It’s something Foxing didn’t expect and certainly were not prepared for. “I was really surprised at the reception we got from this record because it’s very, very specific and personal so it’s weird to have people grasp that and feel a kindredness to it, that’s insane to me,” says Coll. In addition to the new fans who were responding to Foxing’s music in such a personal way, the band also caught the attention of Triple Crown Records. The label took notice of the organic buzz surrounding the band and are re-mastering and rereleasing The Albatross.

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“Indica Two” was recorded in Seattle, Washington
performed by Foxing and produced by Matt Bayles
strings performed by Emma Tiemann
additional vocals by Jess Abbott
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“Redwoods Two” was recorded in Saint Louis, Missouri
arrangement composed and produced by E.M. Hudson of Foxing
vocals by Lena Woods

Kevin Morby: “I love Baltimore. It is a city with a giant heart and has remained one of my favorite places to keep returning to on tour. It is unique and beautiful and you can’t mistake it for anywhere else in the world – Baltimore is one hundred percent Baltimore. All proceeds from both my and the label side will go to the Believe In Music education program, which provides “an innovative music education for Baltimore’s youth”. I do hope you enjoy both versions of the song and if you do decide to donate – thank you for contributing to what I believe to be a great cause.
I wrote Baltimore at the time I was conceiving both ‘Singing Saw’ and ‘City Music’ and recorded a version during both sessions with two different bands. I love the song dearly, but in the end thought that thematically it didn’t belong on either album, and thus have been waiting for this moment to release it as what it has always been meant to be – a single.”
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Believe in Music is so grateful to generous and talented Kevin Morby for the donation of proceeds from his new release, “Baltimore.” We feel strongly that both versions of the song reflect the character and unique vibe of Baltimore City. Having the support of successful, working musicians is incredibly meaningful for our students as they aspire to succeed through an education in music.

released October 25th, 2017

“Baltimore (Sky At Night)” features Sam Cohen on bass, Nick Kinsey on drums and Marco Benevento on piano. Recorded April 2015 at The Isokon in Woodstock, NY by Daniel Goodwin.

“Baltimore (County Line)” features Meg Duffy on bass and Justin Sullivan on drums. Recorded October 2015 at Panoramic Studios in Stinson Beach, CA by Drew Fischer.

Album Premiere: Ha Ha Tonka, 'Heart-Shaped Mountain'

Ha Ha Tonka are an adventurous band from Missouri, opens up its sound with its fifth album, “Heart-Shaped Mountain”. As with its past releases, the band’s gift for clear-eyed, intelligent songwriting proves that they’re still a cut above other bands that fuse indie with Americana, while remaining beholden to neither style. A song like “Favor” could fit in as a campfire singalong, “Going That Way” takes on a careening momentum as she comes around the mountain, while a somewhat left field song like “Land Beyond” seems to take its cues from somewhere else entirely, The album is out March 10th on Bloodshot Records.

Over their history, Ha Ha Tonka has recorded four critically acclaimed albums, toured the world, played Lollapalooza and Austin City Limits, and appeared on Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservations. Through it all, these Ozarks natives have made friends, found love, started familes, and grown and matured together.

Heart-Shaped Mountain is a reflection of that development and maturity. Once aptly summed as “Indie-Americana, where Alabama meets Arcade Fire, ” Ha Ha Tonka has expanded their sonic palette, unveiling balanced, sublime, pop radio accessible heights and an emotionally broader, post-punk songwriting range, a la Apache Relay or a less enigmatic Jonsi, while keeping their trademark harmonizing vocals, jangly Southern revelry and crunchy hooks fully in tact. At it’s core, Heart-Shaped Mountain is an album about love and growth. At a time when divisiveness fills the headlines, Ha Ha Tonka is fighting the good fight, building narrative-tributes to friends and loved ones, memories past and prospects of the future.

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please  check out their previous albums , such a good band .

CD - The Hook Up - All 5 CDs

Band Members

Brett Anderson -guitar, mandolin and vocals
James Cleare – absolutely everything
Lucas Long – bass & vocals
Mike Reilly – drums & vocals
Brian Roberts – guitar & vocals

Foxing have done a lot of touring this past year in continued support of last year’s album “Dealer” (among one of our favourite records of that year). They’ve now made a new video for “Dealer” standout track “Indica” and you can watch that below.  LP Dealer, out now on Triple Crown Records.  Full of emotional vocals and meaningful songs.The whole album flows perfectly and each track has its own feeling.

Foxing debut release The Albatross became a self-fulfilling prophecy for this St Louis band Foxing. The group’s relentless touring enabled the slow-build success of their debut, the aching opening track on Dealer recounts the effect of Conor Murphy having to repeat ugly truths about himself night after night for the better part of two years: “I am caught up in the guilt/ Making a living off of drowning.” Though Dealer is an artistic triumph and a significant advance from The Albatross, it’s even heavier, more compositionally complex, and more personally revealing than its predecessor. And that’s why, from its very first second, Murphy sounds drained over the prospect of doing it all over again every night  Dealer is not an easy listen.

It’s in Foxing’s nature to welcome a challenge, they made the most demanding, unique and self-assured debut. It certainly earned the genre tag—silvery guitar figures streaked and twinkled like Explosions In The Sky, while Murphy’s vocals delivered confrontational and caustic story-led lyrics with spasmodic, burst-and-bloom dynamics. he ripped his heart out while it was still beating and shoved it directly in your face.

“Indica”, which recounts Colls time as a soldier in Afghanistan. Few, if any, indie rock bands have access to this kind of firsthand experience, Aside from a brief clatter of field snares, there’s little but a single, clean guitar and Murphy’s vocal catatonic from both PTSD and self-medication: “Could I give back the sounds of their children’s screams?/ Let go of what I’ve seen?” Dealer isn’t a narrative, but both his civilian and Coll’s soldier could share the exhaustion of closer “Three on a Match”—”For what we did, my love, I’m sorry…the Lord won’t let me in/ I’m survived by the weight of my own sins.” .

Dealer pulls all of Foxing’s influences inward, constructed like an expensive timepiece where you can see every exacting movement behind a glossy lacquer. Murphy’s much-improved vocals negotiate the curvature of “Weave”‘s mournful melody . While there were short instrumental passages on The Albatross, “Winding Cloth” is a full-on string orchestration, offering four minutes to absorb the shell shocked war reportage of “Indica” before segueing into the heavy-hearted poetry of “Redwoods”.

When Murphy and bassist/co-songwriter Josh Coll take on universal topics like sex, religion and war, they’re framed through personal experiences: “The Magdalene” is the most dour song about losing one’s virginity drawing on strict Catholic upbringings that instilled what Coll has said “the internal fear that spirits are in the room witnessing ‘sin’ in action”: “Mother of God on the rosary/ Is she here with us?/ Does she want what she sees?” The guilt carries on to the present day as Murphy becomes choked by the supposedly no-strings hook-ups in “Night Channels” and “Glass Coughs”. Both build up from spare, plaintive introductions to restrained screams and contained, brassy cacophony—Murphy allows you to feel every pang and writhe of guilt.

Foxing are going on an extensive European tour in 2017. Those dates are listed below.

Mar 13 Stereo Glasgow, United Kingdom
Mar 14 Deaf Institute Manchester, United Kingdom
Mar 15 BRUDENELL SOCIAL CLUB Leeds, United Kingdom
Mar 16 Scala London, United Kingdom
Mar 17 Firebug Leicester, United Kingdom
Mar 18 Bodega Nottingham, United Kingdom
Mar 19 The Exchange St Philips, United Kingdom
Mar 21 Joiners Southampton, United Kingdom
Mar 22 Green Door Store Brighton, United Kingdom

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this is a great song from the band American Wrestlers, but maybe its recorded too loud,
It’s a fairly obvious observation for a track that does indeed feel like it’s been squeezed into a tiny shell,. The Glasgow-raised songwriter now living in Missouri likes to claim that this isn’t lo-fi music,The beauty of American Wrestlers is how a simple, gorgeous melody is actually enhanced by this approach.