Posts Tagged ‘R.E.M’

Quivers release new single, 'Videostores'

Melbourne band Quivers have released the music video for their cover of R.E.M.’s ‘Losing My Religion’. The cover is the first track off Quivers’ complete re-imagining of the iconic group’s 1991 album ‘Out Of Time’. Quivers initially released the cover last week after being asked by Seattle label Turntable Kitchen to remake a classic album. The full album of covers will be released on vinyl later this year.

The music video was filmed by Ursula Woods in southern Tasmania earlier this month. Watch the clip below: “The middle era of R.E.M. is the one I grew up hearing through the next room – where this opaque angular jangle band becomes an MTV monster,” Quivers’ Sam Nicholson said in a statement. “We spent four days in a rehearsal studio with our producer Matthew Redlich (Holy Holy, Husky), and made it up as we went along. We all sang, and Bella [Quinlan] takes the lead on our next song out – ‘Texarkana’.”

As for the music video, Nicholson said the clip makes him feel “homesick” for Tasmania. Their dog looking at an albino wallaby is all I need to get through a few more weeks before we can hopefully record music together again.”

This is the 1st song from Quivers’ song by song re-imagining of R.E.M.’s classic Out of Time (1991) for Seattle vinyl label Turntable Kitchen. Out now through their vinyl club. https://www.turntablekitchen.com/2020…Their full album cover of R.E.M.’s “Out of Time” flips the script on tracks like “Shiny Happy People,” reimagines classics like “Losing My Religion,” and transforms the cult classic “Country Feedback” into a gorgeous and stripped down piano ballad.

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As the prospect of another lockdown looms, we’re all left desperate to find media to consume when our brains our too microwaved to sit through a movie and the idea of reading a book feels like an impossible task. R.E.M. have offered a cure to the pangs of boredom — the seminal band will rebroadcast their iconic 1999 Glastonbury Festival performance.

For the first time ever, the band will upload the concert to stream on their YouTube page 72 hours following its initial premiere at 3 p.m. EST on Thursday, August 6th.

The performance took place on June 25th, 1999 on Glastonbury’s Pyramid stage. The headlining set followed performances by Bush, Blondie and Hole.

Hole did such a great set, I was like — I’ve got to ramp this up, I’ve got to be great,” Michael Stipe said in a statement. “I think it was maybe a moment for R.E.M. and the U.K. where we had kind of been forgotten or pushed aside by younger bands, and that was a particular moment at Glastonbury where I think we pulled ourselves back to the front of the line and actually proved, this is what we’re capable of. It was a great show for us!”

The set saw the band perform a trove of their most beloved hits including, ‘Everybody Hurts’, ‘Losing My Religion’, ‘The One I Love’, ‘Man on the Moon’, and ‘It’s the End of the World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine).’

Stipe mused that the band, “felt triumphant every time we played Glastonbury.” Acknowledging that, “The band really stepped up. It’s such a beloved and legendary event that, y’know, whatever stars are aligned for us personally and as a group; we managed to show the best of ourselves at each of the shows we played there.”

Alongside the Artist Rights Alliance, artists such as Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Sia, Lorde, R.E.M., Green Day, Pearl Jam, Blondie, B-52’s, Steven Tyler, and Elvis Costello (many of whom have already expressed annoyance with President Trump using their music) are urging America’s major political party committees to “establish clear policies requiring campaigns to seek consent” of the desired tune-makers before hitting play on their songs.

Earlier this week, R.E.M. signed an open letter, alongside numerous music contemporaries, demanding that politicians seek clearance on the music they play at campaign rallies and other public events.

“As artists, activists and citizens, we ask you to pledge that all candidates you support will seek consent from featured recording artists and songwriters before using their music in campaign and political settings,” their statement, written in partnership with the Artist Rights Alliance reads. “This is the only way to effectively protect your candidates from legal risk, unnecessary public controversy and the moral quagmire that comes from falsely claiming or implying an artist’s support or distorting an artists’ expression in such a high stakes public way.”

Premiering at YouTube next Thursday, August 6th! Continuing the celebration of Glastonbury’s 50th anniversary, watch R.E.M.’s headlining 1999 Pyramid Stage set. Tune in with fans around the world at 8pm BST / 3pm EST. Subscribe here: https://found.ee/REM-Glastonbury99

“Driver 8” kicks off the strongest two-song sequence on “Fables of the Reconstruction” with a bluesy guitar riff that mimics the forward thrust of a locomotive. Add in the insistent repetition of “Take a break, Driver 8/ Driver 8, take a break” that carries over from the first verse into the chorus, and you’re left with the distinct impression of a train barreling through a Southern landscape with no brakes and a crew strung-out on lack of sleep. But something about the song’s mood or urgency shifts as it arrives at the second verse, where all of a sudden Michael Stipe pauses to soak in the imagery that surrounds him: a tree house on a farm, church bells ringing, children playing in the field. But just as the driving riffs give way to arpeggiated chords, so do these pastoral relics of the South give way to images of power lines and other vaguely sinister representations of modernity. Like many of the best R.E.M. songs, “Driver 8” doesn’t pick sides. Not quite sad and not quite celebratory, it keeps its quiet revelations close to the chest.

Fables of the Reconstruction contains plenty of wisdom — including this song, inspired by the title of the book Life: How to Live written by a local Athens character named Brivs Mekis. The lyrics are whimsical — they detail Mekis’ eccentric habits — but suit the bustling music. In particular, Bill Berry’s drumming bristles with spring-loaded energy, which pushes the song forward and highlights the urgency inherent in Peter Buck’s circular riffs and the water-falling backing vocals. R.E.M. dusted off “Life and How to Live It” occasionally even during their final tour, and it became even more galvanizing as the years passed.

Rolling Stone wrote: “Listening to Fables of the Reconstruction is like waking up in a menacing yet wonderful world underneath the one we’re familiar with. R.E.M. undermines our certitude in reality and deposits us in a new place, filled with both serenity and doubt, where we’re forced to think for ourselves.”

The band’s fourth LP – A concept album with Southern Gothic themes and characters
Released: 10th June 1985 – 35 years ago

In case you missed it, there’s a really excellent interview Michael did with the Current on the occasion of his 60th birthday and the release of his second single, “Drive To The Ocean,” which is now available at streaming services.

All of Michael’s earnings from sales and synchronization licensing of the song for the first 365 days will be redirected to Pathway to Paris, a non-profit organization dedicated to turning the Paris Agreement into reality through innovative public engagement, cultural events, supporting citizen driven initiatives and cities in developing and implementing ambitious climate action plans.

Watch the video for “Drive To The Ocean” .

Visit michaelstipe.com to download this video, the audio and other bonus items, and donate to Pathway to Paris

Michael Stipe

Eight years after R.E.M.’s breakup, frontman Michael Stipe is finally going solo. Stipe said he had 18 songs “already ready.” He explained, “Now I’m writing, composing and recording all by myself and for the first time.”

On Saturday, October 5th, Stipe is too release his debut solo single, “Your Capricious Soul”. The track will initially be available only for purchase through Stipe’s website for 77 cents, though there will also be the option to download the song for free digitally.

The release of “Your Capricious Soul” coincides with the International Rebellion climate justice protests on October 7th, and proceeds from the song will go toward Extinction Rebellion to help aid their work of non-violent protest of government inaction to the climate emergency.

In a statement, Stipe says, “I took a long break from music, and I wanted to jump back in. I love ‘Your Capricious Soul’ – it’s my first solo work. I want to add my voice to this exciting shift in consciousness. Extinction Rebellion gave me the incentive to push the release and not wait. Our relationship to the environment has been a lifelong concern, and I now feel hopeful—optimistic, even. I believe we can bring the kind of change needed to improve our beautiful planet earth, our standing and our place on it.”

A video by artist and filmmaker Sam Taylor-Johnson will accompanying the single’s release

Iconic alternative rock band R.E.M. has shared a previously unreleased song, “Fascinating,” an unreleased song from R.E.M. out  with all proceeds going benefit global organization Mercy Corps’ Hurricane Dorian relief and recovery efforts in the Bahamas. Band members Peter Buck, Mike Mills and Michael Stipe recorded “Fascinating” in 2004 at Nassau’s Compass Point Studios

“Fascinating” was originally recorded for the 2001 album “Reveal”, but “it made the record too long… and something had to go,” Mike Mills says. This 2004 version — an ornate ballad with twinkly electronics, an oboe and flute arrangement and a psychedelic climax — was made at Compass Point Studios in Nassau, Bahamas.

In fact, was singer Michael Stipe’s favorite song from the Reveal sessions (according to guitarist Peter Buck’s recollection, as chronicled in David Buckley’s R.E.M. biography, Fiction). The song was produced by Pat McCarthy and engineered by Jamie Candiloro. “It’s really beautiful,” bassist/keyboardist Mike Mills told Buckley. “It has a flute, oboe arrangement, but it made the record too long… and something had to go.” R.E.M. rerecorded the track in Nassau for 2004’s Around the Sun, but the lush ballad ultimately didn’t jibe with that spare, atmospheric album. Now this poignant outtake finally finds its fitting moment, as a means to aid the country where R.E.M. enjoyed over two months of creative retreat.

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“We first became aware of Mercy Corps around the time of Hurricane Katrina, and we supported their efforts to help in that situation,” says Mills . “I spend a lot of time every year in the Abaco Islands, which was literally ground zero for this disaster. I know a lot of people who lost everything — their homes, their businesses, literally everything they own is gone.”

“I have been fortunate to spend many weeks working and playing in the Bahamas, making friends and lots of music there,” Mills continues. “It breaks my heart to see the damage wrought by Hurricane Dorian. Please help us and Mercy Corps do what we can to alleviate the suffering caused by this catastrophe.”

Craft Recordings has announced a Monster of a celebration for the 25th anniversary of R.E.M.’s ninth album. November 1st will see the arrival of “Monster” in various physical and digital formats, all newly remastered by Greg Calbi at Sterling Sound.

Monster found the band branching out to explore new sonic avenues, with bolder, louder guitars, minimal overdubs, and spare arrangements supporting lyrics frequently sung from the POV of different characters. Bolstered by the success of the lead single “What’s the Frequency, Kenneth?,” Monster entered the U.S. chart at No. 1, and the band promoted it with their first tour since 1989. “Bang and Blame” also became a U.S. top 20 chart entry, the band’s final such single to date.

After R.E.M.‘s departure from indie-adored IRS Records for the larger filed of Warner Brothers Records, the fear was that the band would be manipulated into producing more radio friendly hits. And while R.E.M. managed to do that, it was not at the cost of their fine lyrical and musical frontier. By the arrival of MonsterR.E.M. had further established themselves as a powerhouse of a band with multi-Platinum successes like Green (1988), Out of Time (1991), and the legendary Automatic for The People (1992).

Monster, released in 1994, delivered the hit single “What’s The Frequency, Kenneth?”, as well as other more minor hits. Monster would also become the album that started an alienation from the more casual fans. All R.E.M. albums after Monster (there would be six more) were much less popular (although I never understood why).

In his liner notes, Perpetua offers that Monster “had no precedent in the band’s catalogue,” adding that R.E.M had “never been this distorted and dirty, or this glam or this flirty.” Peter Buck adds, “We were trying to feel like a different band…We wanted to get away from who we were.” Perpetua observes that “there’s no question that the characters on Monster are all dealing with obsession in some form or another, whether it’s the infatuated narrator of ‘Crush with Eyeliner,’ the lovelorn protagonist of ‘Strange Currencies,’ or the cackling supervillain in ‘I Took Your Name.’” As dark as some of the subject matter is, though, R.E.M. still infuses the songs with a dash of absurdity, irony and a humorous wink.”

Despite the enormous success of the 4x platinum album, producer Scott Litt was never fully happy with his finished mix. He states in the press release, “I had told the band through the years that if there was ever a chance to take another shot at mixing the album, I wanted to do it.” This anniversary edition has given him that opportunity, and he’s incorporated entirely different vocal takes and instrumental parts either buried in the original mix or completely absent from it.

On November 1st 2019, Craft Recordings will celebrate the album’s 25th Anniversary with a definitive 5CD/1BD Box that provides not only a newly remastered version of Monster but also a new Scott Litt-remixed version that sonically brings Stipe’s vocals to the front. The box will also include a collection of 15 previously unreleased demos, and the full 25-song performance from their June 3rd, 1995 show at the Rosemont Horizon in Chicago that was opened by Luscious Jackson, spread over 2CDs. The Scott Litt-remixed album will be on a CD of its own. The Blu-ray will supply a high resolution Stereo version mix as well as a 5.1 Surround mix. The Road Movie film is included as are six music videos (“What’s The Frequency, Kenneth?”, “Crush With Eyeliner”, “Star 69”, “Strange Currencies”, “Tongue”, “Bang and Blame”). A stuffed book of notes, photos, interviews, and more is included.

For those interested in a less expansive option, an expanded edition of Monster offering the original album and the 2019 remix will also be available on two 180-gram vinyl LPs or two CDs, both featuring reimagined cover art by longtime R.E.M. designer Chris Bilheimer. The remastered album will also be available as a standalone 180-gram vinyl LP, with Bilheimer’s original Monster art.

We’re pleased to announce the vinyl reissue of In Time: The Best of R.E.M.1988-2003. Spanning 1988’s “Green” to 2001’s “Reveal”, plus two previously unreleased tracks, the album charts the evolution of one of America’s most critically and popularly acclaimed rock bands. In addition to the wide reissue of In Time, a special translucent blue version of the 2-LP set will be available exclusively at Barnes & Noble.

Originally released in late 2003, In Time serves as an opportunity to reflect on the astonishing creative and cultural influence that R.E.M. offered during the height of their 30-year run together. One of the most revered groups to emerge from the American underground, singer Michael Stipe, guitarist Peter Buck, bassist Mike Mills and drummer Bill Berry—who amicably retired from the band in 1997—helped originate college rock during the post-punk scene of the ’80s, and went on to become one of most popular and critically acclaimed bands in the world; their idiosyncratic blend of brash tunefulness, poetic lyrics, chiming guitars and evocative vocals served as a soundtrack to the cultural tide of the late ’80s and ’90s.

Available for the first time on vinyl in over 15 years, the album includes 18 hits, Out June 14th.

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Unless you’re a serious R.E.M. scholar, you’ve probably never heard of Bingo Hand Job, the fictitious name used by the Athens, Georgia alt-rock greats for a pair of secret acoustic gigs at a London club in the spring of 1991. Recorded just after the release of Out of Time, this official bootleg includes live takes on several highlights from that album (“Low,” “Half a World Away,” “Radio Song”) plus older classics like “Fall on Me,” “Perfect Circle” and “Swan Swan H.” It’s out on a two-LP edition of 3,000.

No witnesses of a Bingo Hand Job gig could be found. No recordings existed. Yet, when it was announced that the enigmatic band and some unusual friends would play London’ s 200-capacity club, The Borderline, on March 14th and 15th, 1991, tickets were quickly sold out, traded and re-sold at unreasonable prices. Who were these guys only known as The Doc, Raoul, Ophelia and Stinky (with friends Spanish Charlie, Conrad and Violet)? Legendary, colossal and now of mythical proportions, the second night – March 15th, 1991 – is finally and officially released for the very first, and only time! Released for the first time, fully authorised by Michael Stipe as “Stinky”, Peter Buck as “Raoul”, Mike Mills as “Ophelia”, Bill Berry as “The Doc”.With friends Spanish Charlie (Peter Holsapple), Conrad (Billy Bragg) and Violet (Robyn Hitchcock). A blistering hits-packed set, from “a band at the terrifying height of its popularity, caught in the spotlight between college rock integrity and Unplugged stardom.”

‘Stinky, Raoul, Ophelia & The Doc’ are coming to you real soon..R.E.M. will be featured in this year’s Record Store Day extravaganza with this 2LP release: ‘Bingo Hand Job: Live At The Borderline 1991’ which features the second of the 2 shows they did, on 15th March 1991.

Tracklisting:

Side A:
1. World Leader Pretend
2. Half A World Away
3. Fretless
4. The One I Love

Side B:
1. Jackson / Dallas
2. Disturbance At The Heron House
3. Belong
4. Low

Side C:
1. Love Is All Around
2. You Are The Everything
3. Swan Swan
4. Radio Song

Side D:
1. Perfect Circle
2. Endgame
3. Fall On Me
4. Get Up
5. Moon River.

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Happy 8th birthday to R.E.M.’s farewell de force ‘Collapse Into Now’, released on this day in the US on 8th March 2011.

Sessions for Collapse Into Now started back in early 2009 with songs worked up with interesting titles such as ‘After Ski At Timberline Lodge’, ‘Rusty In Orchestraland’, ‘Victim Of Psychic Surgery’ & ‘Sounds Of The Big Racers’..., (the guys certainly having fun) eventually changing to more. For Collapse Into Now, R.E.M., which is singer Michael Stipe, guitarist Peter Buck, and bassist Mike Mills, re-teamed with Grammy Award-winning producer Jacknife Lee, who produced the band’s acclaimed previous album Accelerate. Lee is also noted for his work on albums by U2, Snow Patrol, The Hives, and indie stalwarts Kasabian, Editors, Aqualung, and Bloc Party. R.E.M. and Lee recorded the album in New Orleans at the Music Shed and in Berlin at the famed Hansa Studios, where several legendary albums, including David Bowie’s Heroes, U2’s Achtung Baby, and Iggy Pop’s Lust for Life, were made. Additional recording and mixing was done at the venerable Blackbird Studio in Nashville.

The band has also revealed that Collapse Into Now features some very special guests: Patti Smith, guitarist Lenny Kaye, Peaches, Eddie Vedder, and The Hidden Cameras frontman Joel Gibb.

“I guess a three-legged dog is still a dog,” said Michael Stipe when drummer Bill Berry quit R.E.M. in 1997. True, but a three-legged dog never triumphed at Crufts or the racetrack. Even so, the R.E.M. that recorded 1998’s Up (experimental, frequently beautiful), 2001’s Reveal (lush, frequently beautiful) only started listing badly on 2004’s Around the Sun, where a mystifyingly insipid production and sluggish mood got in the way of frequent bouts of beauty. Stung into action, they tore through 2008’s frequently thrilling Accelerate – but can an R.E.M. album ever feel like an event again?

The clock is indeed ticking for the band, this being their 15th album on their 30th anniversary. But Radiohead should be so lucky at this stage. Even if a lyric sheet on a R.E.M. album doesn’t feel right, Stipe’s words are alluring, enigmatic and provocative, free of rhetoric (the Hurricane Katrina aftermath of Oh My Heart notwithstanding). Unlike Accelerate, Collapse into Now is also free of a planned response to a predecessor. It’s as varied and deep as previous R.E.M. classics. It’s not epochal like Automatic for the People, but it can’t be. These are different times.

On that basis, the album kicks off like Accelerate Part Two, with Discoverer and All the Best incorporating that sinewy and keening R.E.M. rock thrust of old. There are also passages that are, yes, frequently beautiful. All five ballads get the tense, urgent delivery they deserve, and at best, Walk It Back show as they get older, R.E.M. are even better at gravitas, Oh My Heart’s accordion/mandolin undertow is an immediate earworm and Every Day Is Yours to Win is the kind of wistful lullaby often reserved for an album finale.

The closing track here is more in line with You from 1994’s Monster: Peter Buck’s guitar is drenched in fuzz, Country Feedback-style; Stipe’s spoken word diatribe and Patti Smith’s solemn incantation equally fire; and a surprise coda returns to Discoverer’s exuberant chorus. Before then, though, we’ve heard the first (non-session) guest men on an R.E.M. album. Every Day… features Eddie Vedder and The Hidden Cameras’ Joel Gibb on valiant backing vocals and Patti’s faithful guitar foil Lenny Kaye transforms Alligator Aviator Autopilot Antimatter into something that’s virtually hard rock (Peaches adds lascivious vocal back-ups). Fun, maybe, but also overblown. Consider it the album’s only misjudgement. Fortunately, That Someone Is You follows in a more dutifully golden, Byrds-ian rush.

One of the great final gasps of R.E.M. is this stunning jam that stresses the idea of carpe diem. It’s about embracing the unknown and the changes that come from within. Musically, the whole thing brims with harmonies, hooks, and the kind of woodsy instrumentation that made the Athens outfit so iconic, but we’ll leave it to Stipe to explain the lyrical nature itself: “I wanted to picture an almost blunt outsider’s perspective – the experience of a guy who is walking through a city that is completely new to him and still very unfamiliar. I have combined these two words to express that. I don’t pretend being a German or a Berliner. Not at all. I just tried to figure out the mind of this outsider….” Well, there you are.

Buck reckons no R.E.M. in 20 years has 12 songs as good as this. 1996’s New Adventures in Hi-Fi may have something to say about that, but Collapse into Now genuinely feels like their first post-Bill Berry album to resemble a four-legged dog. And that, folks, is an event.