Posts Tagged ‘Warner Brothers’

As the British Invasion kicked in the hits dried up for The Everly Brothers; the one bright spot was ‘The Price Of Love’ near-topping the UK charts in 1965; yet Warner Brothers kept faith and the fall of 1966 would find them in a Los Angeles studio with the session elite. Over the following two years they conjured a body of material – three albums and a plethora of singles and out-takes – staggering in both its invention and realisation. RPM bring it all together in this essential three CD collection. The Hit Sound Of The Everly Brothers and The Everly Brothers Sing came in quick succession, mixing intelligent re-workings of rock’n’roll songs – an extraordinary slowed-down ‘Blueberry Hill’ – with contemporary covers like ‘A Whiter Shade Of Pale’, and two excellent Jimmy Webb songs – ‘She Never Smiles Anymore’ and ‘When Eddie Comes Home’.

Equally fine were the compositions of Terry Slater – often co-writes with the Everly wives Jacqueline and Venetia. Slater and Jacqueline would conjure ‘Bowling Green’ the one chart hit of this period. Roots had a clear concept, framed around The Everly Family radio shows of the 40s and 50s, but predominantly featured newer songs from Haggard, Glen Campbell, Randy Newman, and Ron Elliott; among the out-takes is Buffalo Springfield’s ‘Mr Soul’. Over the years Roots’ reputation has only grown; the same deserves to be true for the rest of this rich collection.

In 2014 The Everly Brothers’ legacy was saluted at the Americana Music Assn. show , held at The Troubador, Los Angeles. The artists in the show including Bonnie Raitt, Ry Cooder, Rodney Crowell, T Bone Burnett, Joe Henry, Asher, Rhiannon Giddens, Jim Lauderdale, Dawes, the Milk Carton Kids, used The Everly Brothers music as its musical anchor. With the current widespread rise in popularity of Americana music as a genre, now seems a good time to reappraise and re-establish one of the first true Country Rock albums – the 1968 Everly Brothers album ROOTS. This box set presents the build-up story to this landmark album.

the flaming lips, the flaming lips 2020, the flaming lips video, the flaming lips american head, the flaming lips kacey musgraves, the flaming lips when you come down, the flaming lips ballad

The new Flaming Lips album, “American Head”  is really shaping up to be melodic, A mellow psychedelic record like we haven’t really gotten since Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots. They’ve just shared another single from it, “Will You Return / When You Come Down,” which is really lovely and comes with a video the band made during quarantine at their fully equipped AV studio and plays off the album art.
The Lips are releasing “American Head”, on September 11th via Warner Records. The video for the track that features the band performing the song in the studio in a socially distant manner. Frontman Wayne Coyne co-directed the video with regular collaborator George Salisbury.

The 5:21 minute track dances along thanks to the sparkling instrumentation and soft vocals from both Wayne Coyne and Steven Drozd. Although they’re famously known for their expressions of alternative psychedelic material, the band also once again showcases their ability to deliver a ballad rich in softer melodies. The song’s affiliated video showcases each member appearing to perform their parts in isolation, with Coyne seen in what looks to be surrounded by a clear plastic wrap of sorts.

Longtime collaborator Dave Fridmann co-produced American Head with the band. The album includes “Flowers of Neptune 6,” a new song the band shared in May via a video for the track. The song featured Kacey Musgraves on additional vocals. Musgraves also features on another American Head track, “God and the Policeman.”

When the album was announced in June, the band shared its second single, “My Religion Is You,” via a video for the song. Then they shared another song from the album, “Dinosaurs on the Mountain,”  Then they shared a fourth song from the album, “You n Me Sellin’ Weed,” .

In June, The Flaming Lips performed for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, with the entire band in separate plastic bubbles and also their audience, including some kids, in bubbles. And to make it even more timely, they did “Race for the Prize,” a classic from 1999’s The Soft Bulletin about two scientists racing to find a cure.

American Head is out September 11th via Warner Brothers.

    

In some ways, the Grateful Dead are in fact two separate bands. There’s the studio band, with a robust catalogue of studio albums ranging from psych-rock freakouts to mellow folk rock. They started as a studio band long after they developed the other version of the Dead: the live version, which played shows at Acid Tests and, eventually, football stadiums. Because the central premise of the live Dead was a never-ending quest for some version of perfect — the perfect transition from “China Cat Sunflower” to “I Know You Rider” is possible, if you believe in it — they encouraged fans to tape their shows, and even taped many of their own, meaning their live catalogue is, in some ways, positively endless. It makes the Dead a difficult band to completely grasp, and since 2020 marks their 55th anniversary as a band — and a year where they arguably might be as popular as ever — we partnered with the band and the label to curate eight albums we think give a gateway into the Dead as they were, and opens up different alleyways for listeners to explore.

We start our box with the studio Dead, since the two albums we start with — Workingman’s Dead and American Beauty, both out in 1970 — are the most well-known and accessible albums in the band’s catalogue. In some ways, they made everything that happened after possible, as the albums were big hits, and set the Dead up on legendary tours that gained word-of-mouth reverence around the world.

The next two albums are Live/Dead and Europe ’72, the first being their first release as a live band, and the one that convinced Warner Brothers to let them stay on the label long enough to make the first two albums in our box, and the latter of which is often considered the best commercially released live Dead album, captured on the band’s legendary European tour.

The next four titles are what we consider continuing studies: We have 1973’s Wake of the Flood and 1977’s Terrapin Station in studio Dead, and 1981’s Reckoning and 1990’s Without a Net in live Dead, all four albums giving different snapshots of the Dead as they rolled along their winding road of a career.

As we do with VMP Anthology, picking eight incredible titles isn’t enough: We spared no expense in making these the best sounding albums they can be. We were granted access to the original analogue tapes of seven of the eight albums, and for Without a Net we were granted original digital tapes, since it was recorded digitally. We then sent the tapes to Bernie Grundman mastering, where Chris Bellman cut new lacquers for this project, attempting to preserve the original sound and intent of the Dead as much as possible.

All eight albums come on color 180-gram vinyl, and most of them (Live/Dead, Europe ’72, Wake of the Flood, Terrapin Station, Reckoning, andWithout a Net) are on colour vinyl for the first time as part of this box. Without a Net has never been reissued on vinyl at all until this box set. An original copy of that one in great shape will set you back a pretty penny by itself. We think this box will be filled with definitive editions of these albums that the beginner Dead Head will enjoy, but also will allow the experienced Dead Head to have updated copies of their well-worn editions.

This edition of Anthology will be limited to 7,500, and each set comes in a deluxe box designed by Jeremy Dean, who is known in the Dead community for his work with the Dead iconography. Instead of asking a historian or journalist to write the liner notes for this Anthology, we went to nine artists to give you their personal stories and the history of the albums

The first 3,000 purchasers will also receive an exclusive animated Tetzoscope slipmat. Everyone who purchases will also receive a trial of nugs.net, a site that has exclusive shows from multiple Dead offshoots and much more. And like with all past Anthologies, this one comes with an exclusive podcast series, where two VMP staff members — one who loves studio Dead and hasn’t dived into the live stuff, and one who has never listened to the Dead — grapple with these albums and the Grateful Dead.