Posts Tagged ‘The White Stripes’

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Jack White’s label Third Man Records has already put the final album by the White Stripes back in circulation through their subscription-only Vault Series, packaging the 2007 release with a double-LP set of demos and tracks from the same sessions. This new edition is just the original LP, as it was originally released on vinyl, right down to the sticker placed in such a spot that it needs to be cut through to access the actual records. It’s a cute little trick but will surely leave collectors drooling over whether they can safely peel it off without it tearing or whether cutting into the album’s resale value will be worth it. Whatever your feelings on the matter are, it’s great to have the ultimate statement by Jack and Meg White brought back to the format that serves their high-wattage garage blues antics best.

The White Stripes seemed to have wandered far afield of the nervy electric blues of their breakthrough album “Elephant” with 2005’s gloomy “Get Behind Me Satan“. Then came “Icky Thump”, their last blast of garage-band glory.

This return-to-form LP arrived on June 15th, 2007, It couldn’t have had less in common with “Get Behind Me Satan”, which sold about half as much as 2003’s “Elephant” – a platinum smash that featured “Seven Nation Army.” The experience seemed to have stung singer/guitarist Jack White, who developed a newfound appreciation for remaining true to one’s roots.

“I told someone that one of these new songs could be an old 45 of ours,” White admitted in a 2007 talk with the New York Times. “And they said, would you want the Beatles to have ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand’ on the White Album? And I said, yeah, I would love that — what would be wrong with that?”

With “Icky Thump”, White’s stinging guitar moved forward where pianos and light orchestral arrangements once were. Tough, blues-inflected songs replaced the quiet balladry that dominated Get Behind Me Satan.

Credit must also go to a year spent on the road with White’s other band, the Raconteurs. The time away seemed to have sharpened his riffs to a razor’s edge – even as it loosened him up. “Rag and Bone,” a talking-blues in the style of John Lee Hooker, boldly recalled the White Stripes‘ fizzy initial successes, while “Little Cream Soda” grew out of an on-stage improvisation.

“You Don’t Know What Love Is (You Just Do as You’re Told)” howled with an open-hearted, country-soul rawness, while two tracks (“Prickly Thorn, but Sweetly Worn” and “St. Andrew”) featured a bagpipe. The White Stripes converted a video treatment by Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind director Michel Gondry into a finished song (“I’m Slowly Turning Into You”), and even included a mariachi-driven cover of Patti Page’s “Conquest.”

“When it comes to the songs themselves, the songs are in charge – not me,” White told Reuters in 2007. “Take a song like ‘You Don’t Know What Love Is (You Just Do As You’re Told).’ That was pretty much a country song in my mind. If I really was in control I could have just said, ‘Hey, how dare you allow electric guitar and heavy organ on there,’ but I don’t do that. I let the song tell me what it wants.”

Recorded over three weeks with drummer Meg White in Nashville, “Icky Thump” also arrived as they made a seemingly uncomfortable shift to a major label. Hints came in the selection of “Conquest,” but also the subtext of this album’s gnarled title track – their first-ever Top 40 single. Both seemed to point to lingering trust issues for the White Stripes, those heroes of garage-rock outsider-dom. “Icky Thump” is “about people using other people,” White said in 2007. “The theme is ‘Who’s using who?'”

As with many bands who came before them, it seemed the White Stripes‘ long-awaited success simply created more pressure. “Icky Thump” scored a career-best but, like “Get Behind Me Satan“, that didn’t match the million-LP sales of “Elephant” or 2001’s “White Blood Cells“. An accompanying tour was cut short, with White citing Meg’s growing anxiety about performing, and the White Stripes went into an extended hiatus.

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To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the release of White Blood Cells, Third Man Records is privileged to release “White Blood Cells XX”, the companion to The White Stripes’ universally acknowledged 2001 album. Disc one contains 13 tracks previously unreleased demos, outtakes, alternate takes and unheard work-in-progress nuggets. Disc two is a previously unreleased live recording from Headliner’s in Louisville, Kentucky on September. 6th, 2001.”

For a band widely defined by its self-imposed rules, the strictures employed on “White Blood Cells” (while seemingly overlooked by the general public) are largely responsible for its breakthrough nature. No blues, no guitar solos, no guest musicians, no cover songs, no bass. Think about that and let it sink in. All of these elements are used extensively across just about every other studio recording across the Stripes entire career. But as an attempt to deviate from the profile of “De Stijl” the previous year, these guidelines would help carve out this work of incredible stature. To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the release of White Blood Cells, Third Man Records is privileged to release White Blood Cells XX, the companion to the White Stripes’ universally acknowledged 2001 album.

On July 3rd, 2001, the White Stripes released “White Blood Cells“, the album which would launch them to mainstream worldwide success.

The duo had spent their early years developing a passionate fanbase in their hometown of Detroit. Rousing performances at the local clubs had helped the White Stripes develop a reputation. Their self-titled 1999 debut album was a raw, unfiltered rush of frantic blues rock. Its follow-up, 2000’s De Stijl, found the group further forming their sound.

“There’s definitely a childishness in it,” Jack explained in 2000, while trying to describe his band’s style. “From Meg’s standpoint, the drumming is real primitive and I really love that. My voice, I think, sometimes sounds like a little kid. You see that approach in a lot of great bands, [for example] Iggy Pop throwing tantrums on stage. Everybody’s still that same person they were when they were young — at least they still want to be. They still want to have that freedom.”

Tours alongside Pavement and Sleater-Kinney took the White Stripes beyond the Motor City. Music fans and media alike were suddenly taking notice. As hype surrounding the band continued to grow, they retreated to Memphis to record a third album. To say that the sessions were a whirlwind would be an understatement.

“There were probably only three real days of recording,” Jack revealed “We really rushed the whole album, to get that feel to it, a real tense thing coming out of it.”

Engineer Stuart Sikes said that “we just set up and they started going. Jack knew what he wanted. Meg didn’t really think they should be recording: She thought the songs were too new. Jack pretty much knows what he wants, has a really good idea what he’s going for.”

Material for White Blood Cells was culled from a variety of sources. Some tracks were brand new, while others were leftovers from Jack’s previous band, 2 Star Tabernacle. “It was cool because a lot of things had been sitting around for a long time, stuff I had written on piano that had been just sitting around not doing anything,” said Jack “And it was good to put them all together at once, put them all in the same box and see what happened.”

Jack warned Sikes “more than once not to make it sound too good,”. “Basically he wanted it as raw as possible, but better than if it was recorded in somebody’s living room. He steered me that way, and I ran with it.”

The LP title and artwork would be reflective of the White Stripes’ ascent to fame. “The name, White Blood Cells, for the album, is this idea of bacteria coming at us – or just foreign things coming at us, or media, or attention on the band,” “It just seems to us that there are so many bands from the same time or before we started that were playing and are still playing that didn’t get this kind of attention that we’re getting. Is the attention good or bad?”

The results were met with critical acclaim: Uncut magazine compared the band to Zeppelin, while Pitchfork said the White Stripes “summon the Holy Spirit and channel it through 16 perfectly concise songs.” The New York Times argued that the band “made rock rock again by returning to its origins as a simple, primitive sound full of unfettered zeal.”

White Blood Cells was initially released on the indie label Sympathy for the Record Industry, but demand soon exceeded the company’s limits. Major labels came calling, including V2 Records.

“This was the type of band that I found completely fascinating musically and conceptually,” Andy Gershon, president of V2,. “When you look at it — the whole “brother-and-sister” thing, dressed in red and white, really raw — I figured this will never get on the radio. But I didn’t care about getting hits.”

Gershon’s instinct to sign the band was wise. However, his assumption that they wouldn’t have hits would be way off base.

The lead single “Fell in Love With a Girl” quickly became an alternative-radio mainstay, while its groundbreaking video – made with Lego blocks and directed by future Academy Award winner Micheal Gondry – earned heavy rotation on MTV.

Further gems included the fuzzed-out garage rocker “Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground,” twangy “Hotel Yorba,” and the sweetly nostalgic “We’re Going to Be Friends.”

White Blood Cells would eventually sell more than a million copies in the U.S. Multiple outlets named it among the best albums of 2001 and (later) the top albums of the 2000s. The White Stripes performing “I’m Finding It Harder To Be A Gentleman” live at The Gold Dollar in Detroit, MI on June 7th, 2001. Listen to the original studio recording now in HD and the live version of “I’m Finding It Harder To Be A Gentleman” on the 20th Anniversary deluxe digital release of White Blood Cells

Through the excitement, media fanfare and being hailed rock’s latest savior, Jack stayed even keeled.

“In the end, it doesn’t really matter,” he said in 2003, “because I always think, in 20 years’ time, the only thing that’s going to be left is our records and photos. If we’re doing something meaningful with those, that’s what will live forever – so that’s what’s really important.”





The White Stripes

The White Stripes have shared the full version of their “From The Basement” performance from 2005 for the first time, Created by Radiohead producer Nigel Godrich, the web TV series ran between 2007 and 2009 and saw The White Stripes and Thom Yorke perform during its pilot episode.

Originally recorded in November 2005 at Maida Vale Studios in London, this is the first time that The White Stripes’ entire “From The Basement” performance – as well as “exclusive, never-before-seen B-roll from the session” – has been available to watch in full. The White Stripes played such tracks as ‘Blue Orchid’, ‘Forever for Her (Is Over for Me)’ and ‘As Ugly As I Seem’ during their performance, while they also covered Captain Beefheart’s ‘Party of Special Things to Do’.

“The dream of From the Basement is to capture great performances with the most direct and beautiful coverage possible, both sonically and visually,” Godrich said in a statement. “We were so fortunate early on to have the support of Jack and Meg who instinctively understood the concept of the show and so came to be part of it.

“As a result, we have this amazing snapshot of their fantastic energy and style. It’s an intimate and direct performance, something magic, powerful and special. A day I will not forget.”

Director Sophie Muller said: “Everything fell into place very quickly, and because of Meg and Jack’s ease and natural chemistry with each other I could just shoot what I saw. Whatever it was between them made it very simple, but so, so special and it was an honour to be there. I just love this electrifying performance.”

Jack White added: “It was beautifully filmed and the sound quality makes a performance on a regular TV show sound like a wax cylinder recording. No host. Thank God.”

The From The Basement footage is the latest in a series of archive performances that The White Stripes have shared with their fans over the past six months.

The White Stripes’ full set from Episode 1 of “From The Basement”. Originally broadcast in November 2005, this is the first time the entire performance has been made available in full, along with exclusive, never-before-seen B-roll from the session.

Setlist: 00:30​ – Blue Orchid 03:06​ – Party of Special Things To Do 05:27​ – Forever For Her (Is Over For Me) 09:22​ – As Ugly As I Seem 14:11​ – Little Ghost 16:31​ – Red Rain

Earlier this month, the duo shared a fierce 2007 performance of ‘Seven Nation Army’ from their set at that year’s Bonnaroo festival.

The White Stripes Greatest Hits

The first-ever official anthology of recordings from the iconic rock duo, Jack and Meg White, is an essential career-spanning collection highlighting 26 previously released White Stripes songs – from late nineties flashes of brilliance through early 2000s underground anthems, masterful MTV moon man moments, grammy-grabbing greatness, and worldwide stadium chants…the songs here are as wide-ranging as you can imagine.

Twentysome years ago, a brother and sister climbed into the third floor attic of their southwest Detroit family homestead and bashed out a primitive cover of David Bowie’s “Moonage Daydream,” sparking something in both of them and leading them to take their simple guitar-drums-voice approach to a local open mic night on bastille day. in what feels like a whirlwind, they record and release two 7-inch singles for a local indie label. a not-so-local indie offers to put out a full-length album. they start touring. another album. more touring. another album.

Accompanying the announcement is a previously unreleased live video of the band performing “Ball and Biscuit”—the only song so far confirmed for the tracklist—Live in Tokyo in 2003.

In addition to the standard CD, double LP, and digital editions, a 3xLP edition with colored vinyl will be available as part of Third Man’s Vault Package subscription. The Vault version also features new artwork from the White Stripes’ collaborator Rob Jones, silk-screen prints, and White Stripes-themed magnetic poetry. More special versions, benefitting independent record stores, will be announced later, according to a press release.

Folks really start to pay attention. crazy touring, more albums, accolades, wildest dream after wildest dream coming true. “world-renowned” becomes an appropriate descriptor, as does “long-building overnight sensation.” the same hard work and dedication that the White Stripes exhibited from the onset of their existence is what has been poured into the White Stripes Greatest Hits. in an era of streaming where the idea of a “Greatest Hits” album may seem irrelevant – that an act’s most streamed songs are considered their de facto “Hits” – we wholeheartedly believe that great bands deserve “Greatest Hits” and that a large part of Third Man Records’ and the White Stripes’ successes have been built on zigging when the rest of the music business is zagging. thus, for a great band with great fans, a greatest hits compilation for the White Stripes is not only appropriate, but absolutely necessary.

expected release: 4th December 2020

 

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On June 15th, 2000, The White Stripes performed at Jay’s Upstairs in Missoula, MT, just five days before the release of De Stijl, the band’s second album. Today, June 20th, 2020, “De Stijl” celebrates its 20th birthday, and though The White Stripes are no longer together, the band has released footage of “Death Letter” from that Jay’s Upstairs concert, which will also appear in the Third Man Records Vault Package #44.

The 2000 Son House cover came before frontman Jack White would add a Big Muff to his pedalboard, and well ahead of its emergence as a fan-favorite live track, way back in the days of $1.25 pints of Pabst and Hi8 camcorders. This rendition of “Death Letter” featured Jack’s high-pitched vocals, percussive guitar picking, and Meg White‘s steady drumming, typical of the band’s minimalist garage rock and blues sound at the time. While not as extensive as later versions, which usually include an improvised intro and some segues, Jack took the solo to familiar places thanks to his trusty DigiTech Whammy pedal and high-gain tone.

Though the band had only been together for a couple of years at this point, Jack and Meg’s chemistry is palpable. A simple glance or an audible “Hey!” from Jack signals the changes, which sees Meg follow in lockstep. The crowd seems entranced throughout the grainy video too, and while there are not many people at the tiny venue, it certainly foreshadows the arenas that followed in later years.

In celebration of the 20th Anniversary of De Stijl, watch The White Stripes (Jack White & Meg White) perform “Death Letter” live at Jay’s Upstairs in Missoula, MT from June 15th, 2000! This performance took place during the peak of De Stijl touring, and was taken directly from the original tapes deep within the Third Man Records archives for the 20th anniversary of De Stijl Third Man Vault Package.

De Stijl, dutch for “the style”, is the second album released by The White Stripes on June 20th, 2000. Head to the Third Man Records website for more information on future vault releases.

The White Stripes' 1999 debut

Jack White will mark the 20th anniversary of The White Stripes’ self-titled debut with a new companion vinyl release.

The White Stripes XX (as its called) contains previously-unheard outtakes from the album’s recording sessions, a live recording of a September 1999 performance in Raleigh, NC, a DVD containing performance footage of two Michigan shows that year, a 24-page archival booklet featuring never-before-seen photos, lyrics, flyers, and other insights, all housed in a hard-cover hinged case.

The cache of unreleased material includes an acoustic demo of “Dead Leaves”, alternate takes of “Jimmy the Exploder”, “I Fought Piranhas”, and “Wasting My Time”, and cover of Burt Bacharach’s “Little Red Book” (listen to a sample here). Burt Bacharach and Hal David may have written “Little Red Book” for the film What’s New Pussycat?, but Love’s version (their 1965 debut single) was clearly the inspiration for The White Stripes’ cover, which will be on the 20th Anniversary Box set for their debut album. Jack and Meg play this like they wrote it.

Other rarities include versions of “Screwdriver”, “Sugar Never Tasted So Good”, and “”Why Can’t You Be Nicer to Me?”. All of these tracks were newly mixed by White in celebration of the album’s 20th anniversary.

The White Stripes XX is available through Third Man Records’ Vault subscription program. You can get more info and sign up here.

In related news, Jack White is presently touring the country with his other acclaimed rock band, The Raconteurs.

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The White Stripes played their final concert at the Snowden Grove Amphitheater in Southaven, Mississippi 12 years ago. Now, their full recorded performance is accessible for the first time ever, The White Stripes: Live in Mississippi is available to stream and download via Nugs.net, and it features the band’s 20-song set from July 31st, 2007, along with a four-song encore. Tracks include “Icky Thump,” “In the Cold, Cold Night,” “Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground,” and more.

The White Stripes’ archivist and Third Man Records co-founder Ben Blackwell posted a statement on Nugs.net recalling the group’s final performance, and the moment he realized it would be their last. Find Blackwell’s full post along with the White Stripes’ hand-written setlist from the show here.

“I can’t even tell you how much it means for me to be here tonight…so I’m not even gonna bother”

Jack White, July 31st, 2007

Not long after I walked offstage as the hired-gun drummer for opening act Dan Sartain, an assortment of crew and musicians and friends gathered together and took part in a celebratory, raise-the-glass toast, all led by Jack White to mark the end of the run of nine shows in the previous ten days.

As the crowd thinned, Meg White and I were the last ones left standing there. Apropos of nothing, cups in hand, not even in a conversation at that point, Meg said to me, “I think this is the last White Stripes show.” Confused, I responded “Well, yeah, last show of this leg of the tour.” She replied “No…I think this is the last White Stripes show ever” and slowly walked away. I was dumbfounded. I had no idea what she was talking about. I had no idea what she meant.  I had no idea what to do. I looked around to see if anyone else heard what Meg had said, but I was all alone.

Within minutes, the band was onstage. The White Stripes had never played Mississippi prior to this performance and it’s clear the deep musical heritage of the state loomed large in Jack’s mind as he attacked the performance setlist-free.

“Stop Breaking Down” was an unexpected opening song. Despite being released in 1999, it had only opened a set once before, just three weeks earlier. The inspiration behind that first opening performance was the band headlining the Ottawa Bluesfest, being met with newspaper headlines that asked “Are the White Stripes bluesy enough to headline Bluesfest?” Seems as Jack’s intention of starting both these shows with the Robert Johnson classic was to leave no doubt to a skeptical homegrown audience of armchair connoisseurs or a lazy Canadian newspaper editor that the band was well-within their powers conveying the blues to the masses.  All that was only further buoyed by Jack later throwing in an unexpected tease of another Robert Johnson song “Phonograph Blues” to assuredly placate the ghosts of the Mississippi Delta.

Inspired, one-of-a-kind takes on both “As Ugly As I Seem” and “Astro” now jump out to me as beautifuleach song’s last hurrah from the band that birthed them. Exploratory adventures the both of them, proving that no piece was ever finished or finalized or etched into stone. Rather, they were all living, creative works, changing and adapting over the years and begging to be recorded and shared and analyzed by all of you reading this right now.

Jack began the encore by himself, pouring every last drop of feeling and emotive vocal quiver into a solo offering of “300 MPH Torrential Outpour Blues” that was achingly bare. The raw force behind it feels beyond naked…as if Jack had pulled back his own skin to reveal his truest, innermost thoughts, particularly when he changed the lyrics on the fly and sang…

“See there’s three women in my mind that know they have the answer, but they’re not letting go…

What else is new? I’m the only one that seems to care where I should go”

After re-listening to this show for the first time in ages, I feel like only now have I fully absorbed the enormity of that line. Frankly, it just hit me like a freight train to the chest. I was caught entirely off-guard. I couldn’t help but be moved to tears.

Moments like that make me feel this show is the audio manifestation of opposing, equally-powered forces clawing for control of my brain in an id-versus-ego battle of monumental proportions. On one end I’m mourning, absolutely fucking hurt that this huge presence in my life, my occasional reason for being, my family both by blood and by choice…just ceased to be. And yet at the other end, I am so goddamned lucky that the White Stripes ever existed at all…that people even paid attention, that the band was able to make a lucrative career out of their passion, out of art and that I had a side-stage seat to the entirety of their existence.

After the completion of a bombastic, career-defining version of “Death Letter”, Jack poignantly says “Son House, thank you for finally letting me come home.” House was a passive participant in this matter, having died in the band’s hometown of Detroit in 1988. But Jack’s comment has seemingly little to do with any physical structure…what he is saying is that Son House (and to a larger extent, blues music in general) provided both he and Meg with an avenue to pursue their artistic vision. In this sense, home is not spoken in the predominant, noun usage of the word to describe where one lives, but rather in a more colloquial, adverbial sense meaning ‘deep, to the heart.’

In short, the blues is home. The blues provides comfort, the blues provides center, the blues provides foundation.  It provides a manner to express one’s feelings, both a connection to the past and a path through the future.

Ending the set with Leadbelly’s “Boll Weevil” and the singalong chorus repeating “he’s looking for a home” only further drives this point, well…home. The White Stripes were only able to become THE WHITE STRIPES because of the blues. Able to find their voices, to spread the word in a way that was seeming antithetical to two white kids born in Detroit in the 1970’s.  Blues was the language, not chosen, but seemingly divined, to best communicate themselves, to express, to converse, to paint this masterpiece. Upon the completion of the set, with a backdrop of Who-like synth arpeggiations singing out into the night, Jack sincerely says the following…

“I can’t believe how long it has taken us to get here. Thanks for waiting. Thanks for coming. Thanks for buying our records. Thanks for buying a ticket. We love you very much. Thank you. God bless you Son House. God bless you Robert Johnson. Thank you so much.”

I can think of no better epilogue for Jack to punctuate the White Stripes last-ever live performance. Each thought a simple sentence that, upon closer inspection, opens up to a wider meaning…not just spoken to these folks in suburban Memphis on a Tuesday night. Rather, they speak to all their fans across the world. About the journey. About patience. About action. About appreciation. About presence. About gratitude. And ultimately, about the blues. Which is, arguably, all it was ever about.

In the intervening twelve years I’ve had countless conversations with Meg White. And I have never once, not for a moment, even considered asking her what was going through her head that night in Mississippi. To me, she has found her home and that is all that matters.

What would YOU do if half of your favorite band told you (and ONLY you) it would be their last show immediately prior to taking the stage?

The White Stripes recently also announced a 20th anniversary box set reissue of their self-titled debut.

Jack White

Jack White  has announced a new live concert film, Jack White: Kneeling at The Anthem D.C., along with an accompanying six-song live EP. The film and EP premiere September. 21st, .

The film documents White’s second sold-out night at The Anthem during his Boarding House Reach tour, and features a career-spanning set, with tracks from The White Stripes, his solo career and more. It was directed by Emmett Malloy, who directed the 2009 White Stripes documentary Under the Great White Northern Lights.

A six-song EP featuring performances from the same show will be released exclusively on Amazon Music on the same day as the film’s release. The tracklist can be found below. White will be continuing his world tour throughout the autumn.

Watch the trailer for Jack White: Kneeling at The Anthem D.C. Get a front row view to Jack White’s career-spanning concert at Washington, D.C.’s The Anthem flmed on May 30th, 2018 as part of his Boarding House Reach tour.

The film takes from White and his band’s second of two sold-out shows at The Anthem on May 30th, 2018, and also features footage from White’s travels around DC and his surprise lunchtime performance at DC’s Woodrow Wilson High School. A six-song live EP of highlights from that show will also be available via Amazon Music.

The Anthem show, was a 21-song affair that included nine-song encore, featured cuts from Reach, along with White’s earlier solo albums, plus tracks from his work with The White Stripes, The Raconteurs and The Dead Weather.

Initially broadcast in 2001, these sessions capture Jack and Meg with famed BBC DJ John Peel and are arguably the best document of the White Stripes at the time. These have been widely bootlegged since the original broadcase, but this is an official and authorized repress of the 2016 release in celebration of their 15 year anniversary. This double vinyl set includes both live White Stripes recordings – one from July 25th, 2001 and the second from November 8th, 2001.

The White Stripes Live in Detroit: 1999-2000-2001, In continued celebration of The White Stripes 20th anniversary, Third Man Records is proud to announce Vault Package #34 The White Stripes Live in Detroit: 1999-2000-2001.

Live at the Magic Bag: July 30th, 1999, 180-gram, colored vinyl,

July 30th, 1999 found The White Stripes headlining the Magic Bag in fashionable Ferndale, a northern suburb of Detroit. Chosen as a venue mainly to placate the fans who wouldn’t venture to see The White Stripes in rough-and-tumble Detroit, the show would be their first performance after the release of their self-titled debut album. The cushy environs of the Magic Bag provided Jack with an in-house piano, making this the first time that he and Meg would ever incorporate the instrument live. Highlights include their first-ever stab at Bob Dylan’s “Love Sick,” an endearingly unique solo piano rendition of “You’ve Got Her in Your Pocket,” and a simplistic, embryonic rendition of “Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground,” all of which provide for a tense performance, filled with equal parts rage and tenderness of which only The White Stripes were capable.

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Track List for Live at the Magic Bag 7-30-1999: Jimmy the Exploder/ Wasting My Time/ Astro/ Cannon / John the Revelator (traditional)/ The Big Three Killed My Baby/ I Just Don’t Know What to Do With Myself (Bacharach/David)/ Love Sick (Bob Dylan) (piano)/ Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground (piano)/ St. James Infirmary (traditional) (piano)/ Suzy Lee/ Stop Breaking Down (Robert Johnson)/ Lafayette Blues/ The Same Boy You’ve Always Known/ You’ve Got Her In Your Pocket (piano)/ Broken Bricks

Live at the Magic Stick: 8-18-2000, 180-gram, colored vinyl

August 18th, 2000 had The White Stripes performing at Detroit’s venerable Magic Stick. Supported by near-and-dear friends (who’d later become bandmates and collaborators), the Greenhornes and Whirlwind Heat, the recording provides a window into the Stripes’ mindset that Summer — just after their West Coast De Stijl headlining tour in June and still yet to experience the insanity of their opening slots for Sleater-Kinney in September. The only known live performance of Captain Beefheart’s “Ashtray Heart” (which they’d just recently laid to tape for eventual release in the Sub Pop Singles Club), a rare live outing for the deep cut “I’m Bound to Pack It Up,” and an electrifying set-ending “Let’s Shake Hands” leave the listener with the palpable sense that something amazing is about to happen for this band.

Track List: You’re Pretty Good Looking (for a Girl)/ When I Hear My Name/ Jolene (Dolly Parton)/ Cannon/John the Revelator (traditional)/ Apple Blossom/ Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground/ Death Letter (Son House)/ Little Bird/ Jimmy the Exploder/ I’m Bound to Pack It Up/ Broken Bricks/ Hello Operator/ Astro / Jack the Ripper (Screaming Lord Sutch)/ Ashtray Heart (Captain Beefheart)/ Do/ Let’s Shake Hands

Live at the Gold Dollar: 6-7-2001, 180-gram, black vinyl

June 7th, 2001 marked The White Stripes final performance at the Gold Dollar in Detroit. As the first of three hometown headlining shows to support the release of White Blood Cells, the feeling in the air that night was one of excitement and anticipation. In what was arguably the most packed show in Gold Dollar history, Jack and Meg delivered beyond expectations and played their new, soon-to-be critically acclaimed record from front to back. Despite an attempt at tackling Get Behind Me Satan in Chicago in 2005, this would be the ONLY time The White Stripes would perform any of their albums in their entirety. In full command of their powers, The White Stripes proved to be both ascendant and transcendent on this night. This show was the triumphant culmination of the previous five years of gigging in Detroit.

Track List: Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground/ Hotel Yorba/ I’m Finding It Harder to Be a Gentleman/ Fell in Love With a Girl/ Expecting/ Little Room/ The Union Forever/ The Same Boy You’ve Always Known/ We’re Going to Be Friends/ Offend in Every Way/ I Think I Smell a Rat/ Aluminum/ I Can’t Wait/ Now Mary/ I Can Learn/ This Protector

Includes Show Poster Reproduction Prints,

High quality reproduction prints of the Jack White-designed posters for each of these shows will be included. Originally limited to no more than two dozen copies printed (Kinko’s color copies were a buck a pop back then!), posted up at local Detroit record shops and watering holes and summarily torn down and thrown away, original copies of these highly-sought-after pieces have been known to command hundreds of dollars on the secondary market. The copies included here are gorgeous, instantly frame-worthy and much lighter on the pocketbook than the costly originals.

Live in Detroit Slipcase, Sturdy slipcase utilizing the rub-on style lettering employed by Jack on a majority of his early flyer designs.