Posts Tagged ‘The Stevens’

The Stevens aren’t as patient as other Australian bands like the Rolling Blackouts on their two albums they constantly jump from idea to idea and song to song, often moving on after only a minute or so. Their songs rarely feel like fragments, though—they’re all fully realized ideas, even if they only run for 70 seconds. That’s obviously unlike Rolling Blackouts, who tend to explore their songs for three or four minutes. They both have that Flying Nun approach to guitar pop, though, with intricate and tuneful guitar interplay and matter-of-fact vocals that might sound resigned but rarely feel dejected.

Centred around guitarists Alex MacFarlane and Travis MacDonald, scratchy pop foursome the Stevens released a 6 song EP in 2012 that was without doubt the catchiest non-Chapter release of the year. Originally on CD-R and cassette only,

Melbourne scratchy pop favourites the Stevens return with their second album “Good”.
Good picks up where their 2014 debut A History Of Hygiene left off – 18 short songs, alternately frenetic or laconic, packed with twists and hooks that merge lo-fi outsider songcraft with 70s prog wizardry and classic rock swagger.

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After establishing a shared obsession for bedroom recording and favourites such as Wire, Guided by Voices, R. Stevie Moore and Flying Nun releases, they began combining their home projects. Together they started writing songs and soon enlisted the help of Macfarlane’s old school friends, Tam Matlakowski and Callum Foley. In 2011 they officially coalesced as a band, which also meant picking a name. They all agreed that Steven was a name

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Melbourne scratchy pop favourites The Stevens reveal “Pulling All The Facts Together”, the second single from their simply titled new album Good.

First single Chancer was premiered on NPR last month, and now “Pulling All The Facts Together”, calling it “a song that brims with harmonies and pop smarts. What’s more, Good is now available via the Chapter Music webstore, Bandcamp . The album came out on July 14th on vinyl, CD and digital,

Good picks up where the Stevens’ 2014 debut A History Of Hygiene left off – 18 short songs, alternately frenetic or laconic, packed with twists and hooks that merge lo-fi outsider songcraft with 70s prog wizardry and classic rock swagger.

Melbourne scratchy pop favourites The Stevens reveal Pulling All The Facts Together, the second single from their simply titled new album Good.

First single Chancer was premiered on NPR last month, and now “Pulling All The Facts Together”, calling it “a song that brims with harmonies and pop smarts.” . What’s more, Good is now up for pre-order via the Chapter Music webstore  or Bandcamp . The album came out on July 14th on vinyl, CD and digital, and pre-orders come with instant downloads of both Chancer and Pulling All the Facts Together.

Good picks up where the Stevens’ 2014 debut A History Of Hygiene left off – 18 short songs, alternately frenetic or laconic, packed with twists and hooks that merge lo-fi outsider songcraft with 70s prog wizardry and classic rock swagger.

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The Stevens formed in 2011 around guitarists Alex Macfarlane (Twerps, Tyrannamen) and New Zealand-born Travis MacDonald, and were soon joined by bassist Gus Lord (Twerps, Boomgates, Tyrannamen) and drummer Matt Harkin.

When Tyrannamen’s Nic Imfeld, backed by a raucous punk band, pleads for you to leave some guy on “You Should Leave Him,” the thought crosses your mind. By the time the rambunctious five-piece have kicked into full gear and Imfeld’s screaming, “We could have it so great,” you are ready to pack your bags. The Melbourne five-piece (which features members of The Stevens, Twerps, and Whipper) call to mind the ramshackle melody of the Undertones, Greg Cartwright’s Reigning Sound, and the power pop moments of fellow Aussies Royal Headache. Led by the tuneful and raw vocals of Imfeld and others, the music pops like buttons from a ripped shirt. But between the rowdiness of “I Don’t Want to Go to Jail” and “My Concrete,” a song about construction sites, there are moments of soulful tenderness such as “Diamond Ring.” They may seem and sound like ruffians, but deep down, Tyrannamen are true romantics.

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