Posts Tagged ‘Palace’

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Chances are you’ve forgotten about the band Palace, the London rock trio whose 2016 debut LP So Long Forever landed not with a thud, but floated quietly across the Atlantic in a cloud of potential streams. Thanks to singles like “Live Well” and “Bitter,” the band have more than 400,000 monthly Spotify listeners—yet, they’d never be the first “British rock band” you’d name if prompted at a party. Unlike so many of the biggest English exports, they’re not punk. They’re something quieter and broodier, and their latest singles even seem to recall their poppier, acoustic beginnings, not too far off from Hozier’s roots-rock debut. It’s been a mysteriously silent few years for the band, but it sounds like our patience may have paid off.

With their sublime second album, Palace have pulled off a rare pop trick. Songs steeped in darkness emerge in to light, from bleak situations spring fresh starts. Bathed in the band’s atmospheric alt-rock, the future feels brighter and more optimistic Life After is both an album about loss and a manual to moving on. “I’m writing this song, to help you breathe again,” sings Leo Wyndham on the opening title track, a shimmering ode to survival. By the epic, seven minute-plus closer Heaven Up There, the theme of Life After is obvious. “Hope,” says Leo. “Hope and positivity – seeing the light at the end of a long tunnel. It’s about going through tough times and coming out the other side.” Palace didn’t start their second album with any plans in place. Buoyed by the reception of their debut, 2016’s So Long Forever, and near two years of sold-out shows and festival slots that won them fans worldwide, the London-based trio of former Dorset school friends had a new-found confidence that they were keen to capture on record.

New album Life After

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With their sublime second album, Palace have pulled off a rare pop trick. Songs steeped in darkness emerge in to light, from bleak situations spring fresh starts. Bathed in the band’s atmospheric alt-rock, the future feels brighter and more optimistic. “Life After” is both an album about loss and a manual to moving on. “I’m writing this song, to help you breathe again,” sings Leo Wyndham on the opening title track, a shimmering ode to survival. By the epic, seven minute-plus closer Heaven Up There, the theme of Life After is obvious.

“Hope,” says Leo. “Hope and positivity – seeing the light at the end of a long tunnel. It’s about going through tough times and coming out the other side.”

Palace didn’t start their second album with any plans in place. Buoyed by the reception of their debut, 2016’s So Long Forever, and near two years of sold-out shows and festival slots that won them fans worldwide, the London-based trio of former Dorset school friends had a new-found confidence that they were keen to capture on record.

Our sole aim was to write better songs “Some songs have an all-enveloping wall of guitars, others are stripped right down. It was about finding the right mood for each song, not settling on one sound.”

Some of the songs had been written on the road, referencing both relationships that had broken down and new bonds that had been forged. Others took shape in the studio and captured events that were taking place in the trio’s lives, often only realised in retrospect.

“A lot of the songs suddenly made sense later down the line,” says Leo. “With a couple, I wrote the lyrics, then they came true. Back home, we were all making new connections and having conversations that filtered in to the songs. I was going through a tough time and writing became my coping mechanism. It became a way of really helping me by giving me an outlet.”

the album ‘Life After’

PALACE – ” Bitter “

Posted: March 29, 2017 in MUSIC
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The debut album ‘So Long Forever’ is out now via Fiction Records. Each note that unfolds in “Bitter” by Palace feels as a carefully crafted and artfully placed as each of the brushstrokes in the painting of the cover art.

The guttural ache of the vocals plays off of the percolating guitar and bluesy syncopation, which all coalesce in the bittersweet emotion of the lyrics, “Why am I always led astray/It’s going to get better, better, better/ I always heard you say.”

There’s something gratifying about following a band that you first see maybe as a support then through to their first headline tour, the release of their EPs and then the debut LP. I’ve followed many bands to this point and one such as Palace,  Effortlessly bulldozing their way on to ‘the scene’ in 2014 with debut EP “Lost in the Night”, it was obvious then that something a little special was a-brewing. And thankfully, like all good journeymen, the London four-piece have kept true to the roots that sowed them.

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Tracks like the hypnotically sparse “Black Heath” ebb and flow with drowsy effervescence, wonderfully framing lead vocalist Leo Wyndham’s endearing drool. Different to much that has come before it, the four piece, like all good storytellers, introduce a number of different elements throughout the song, which mirrors the sonic chiaroscuro and emotional contrasts that appear when looking at the 11 track offering on the whole. This is never more apparent than when the excruciatingly honest and airy “Family” is followed by “Have Faith” .

This effect – which appears throughout – offers a nice balance, both stylistically and temporally. The result is a rounded sound from a band who seem to have very much found their feet, and – to continue the podiatric proverbs – are comfortable in their own shoes. This is seen most explicitly in the re-mastered version of “Bitter” (which appeared on their debut EP). Many would have opted to keep it as it was, but instead, Wyndham et al went for more layers and a slightly more ‘unkempt’ sound, a musical entropy effect if you will, going from the more ordered original to something less so.

At points you do find yourself wanting a little more, however . The title track “So Long Forever” and closer “Slaving On” opt for a faster paced and glitchy backdrop – again providing a nice contrast to Wyndham’s vocal – but only threaten to take off, without ever really getting there. Potentially an aversion to risk? Or perhaps they’re aware, going back to narrative theory, that sometimes it’s the tension and anticipation that cause the strongest effect

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With comparisons to the likes of Foals and The Maccabees a plenty, it does strike me that the release of this emphatic debut becomes all the timelier with the hole left by the departure of latter. One only has to listen to “Holy Smoke” – the album’s pièce de résistance – to realise this. With all the varied elements that appear on the LP melded into one, the three-minute masterpiece sees the London four-piece emphatically flex their various musical muscles, and with this synecdochical track as their flag in the ground, Palace show they have matured-yet-remained faithful, and expanded-yet-honed. So Long Forever is an album from a band who know what they want, and how they want to get there.

Get ‘It’s Over’ instantly when you pre-order ‘So Long Forever’ the new debut album from the band Palace the first taster is the track “It’s Over” which came together during a difficult situation,” Palace explain. “It comes from feeling the need to accept what will be, no matter how bad things are. It’s the realisation that things that seem so solid can be so brittle.”

As we edge closer to the release of their long-awaited debut full-length So Long Forever – due 4th November via Fiction Records – the London four are anything but brittle.

Ever since they appeared with the attention-grabbing track “Veins” back in 2014, Leo Wyndham (guitar, vocals), Rupert Turner (guitar), Will Dorey (bass) and Matt Hodges (drums) have been filling something of a gap in the UK scene with increasing assurance.

“It’s Over” it’s filled with the elements we have come to love from Palace: Wyndham’s distinctive, guttural vocal paints the gently melancholy picture above intricate, interweaving layers of guitar, splashing percussion and warm, rumbling bass. The increasingly impassioned refrain is cleverly coloured with a splash of hope as the track builds to its falsetto-lead climax.

Another wholly impressive, brilliantly returnable outing from a band whose journey you feel is far from over.

As the band gear up for their LP release, the video for ‘Break the Silence’ perfectly encapsulates the bands building fever and this erupts across the new video. Destroying furniture and the burning of everything around them.

“Our album is a great summary of where Palace are as a band,” the said of the record. “It’s a culmination of very early songs and new ones. We wanted an album that takes you on a journey through different emotions and ups and downs.

“It’s our distinctive blues sound mixed with atmosphere and epic reverb. One of the things the album deals with is loss and how we deal with those difficult situations. Whether we fall apart or it makes us stronger.”

The band are garnering huge attention and when you add their artistic merit to their musical expertise you can start to see why. Palace are going to do big things.

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PALACE have revealed tracks from their second EP, ‘Chase the Light’, North London four-piece Palace go beyond initial buzz with a serious first step.

The follow-up to last year’s ‘Lost in the Night’ sees Leo Wyndham and co. furthering their spacious, romantic and effect-doused pop going up a few notches. On the one hand, songs like opener ‘Head About The Water’ and stirring lead ‘Kiloran’ are potential arena-dwellers, but they’re also night lurkers, strangers tracing back their own steps when everyone else is fast asleep.

the release spans from crystallised anthemia to moody balladry (‘Settle Down’) and drunken acoustic swansong ‘Chase the Light’. It’s a big-spanning EP, tracking all of Palace’s sides to date while paving the way for a new direction.

Listen to ‘Chase the Light’ in full

PALACE – ” Kiloran “

Posted: April 14, 2015 in MUSIC
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Palace are one of those great bands who slot into your life like a perfectly fitted puzzle piece. You know when people talk about good music? This is good music: free from any constraints of hype, trendiness, and whatever sound seems to be in fashion, focusing instead on writing music that sounds good whatever the weather, the day, or current emotional state of the listener. We premiered the group’s single “Bitter” last year and now, after supporting Jamie T on his recent tour, we’re back premiering their new one “Kiloran”. The track’s a subtly warm, invigorating hug of sound, which wraps around the listener and envelopes them in a crescendo that, by the time the track ends, transforms into something that lingers around long after the headphones are taken off and stowed away safely in a bag.

 

They Sound Like A languorous summer day spent sun-dappled in bed with a first love, and the knowledge that the moment will end, as all good things do. with a hint  of Jeff Buckley, Foals, Buffalo Springfield, Its a band  You Should Pay Attention to Since these four British lads’ debut single, 2014’s “Veins,” racked up nearly 50,000 plays on Soundcloud in just two weeks, the U.K. music press has been all over them like they were the world’s last jar of marmite. Rowdy rocker Jamie T handpicked Palace to open for him at his first live shows in four years, which raised the band’s profile in its homeland to yet another level. Amazingly, even the Internet commentariat have had mostly positive comments for the group’s new EP, “Lost in the Night”. “Someone on Soundcloud said it’s like Morrissey and Buckley had a baby, which I guess is kind of cool,” says drummer Matt Hodges. “Another guy said we’re like Foals on Xanax, which was quite interesting. We’ve had a few comments about our music being good baby-making music too, so that’s nice.

They Say: Palace write and rehearse in a unique North London space that Hodges describes as “a musical commune/squat.” “It’s had a big influence on us as a band, as there are so many different people working on many different genres of music,” he says. “It’s also a bit of an instrument graveyard — sitars, organs, endless guitars and percussion stuff lying around, which makes for a lot of fun in our downtime when we’re recording. It’s a pretty craggy place with a lot of crap everywhere. It’s gets down to arctic temperatures in the winter, and in the summer we have to pretty much play in our boxers it’s so hot, but it’s been amazing for Palace.” Listen out for the Languid and shimmery, “Bitter” it finds the sweet-sad spot between indie emo and Sixties blues.

Photo: Press

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One of my most adored new bands of 2014 these guys just need to be going places this year. They made my top 10 gigs of 2014 as well as one of my favourite tracks in the year too. It’s only right they’re listed here. Such high hopes for them. Palace are an alternative blues/rock band from London combining laid back guitars with brooding vocals.