Posts Tagged ‘OH’

SNARLS – ” Walk In The Woods “

Posted: October 18, 2019 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
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Though their Bandcamp descriptor “glitter emo alt rock” is apt, the power of Snarls lay in their heart. Not their crushes or their friendships, though they’re plenty fine in themselves, but in the way they sing their dream-pop choruses. Snarls sing like they mean it — because they really, really do. They’re kids who spent their sole EP and this year’s standalone single, “Walk In The Woods,” caught in a rush of living in the moment, adrenaline buzzing, asking to be heard for once.

“Walk In The Woods” is the first single off of snarls’ debut album “Burst”.

Out today, a dynamic cover of Buffalo Springfield’s iconic song, “Go and Say Goodbye,” originally on the group’s debut album and on the flip side of the “Nowadays Clancy Can’t Even Sing” single in 1966. This new edgy country-rock cover is from the Ohio group, Red Wanting Blue. The song features the group’s labelmate, Poco co-founder, Rusty Young, who guests on the song in addition to various Blue Élan artists including Car Astor, Amy Wilcox, Phil Solem of The Rembrandts, and Gina Sicilia among others.

Rusty Young, along with former Buffalo Springfield member Richie Furay singing lead, covered this tune in 1972 on Poco’s fifth album, A Good Feelin’ to Know. It was Poco’s version that Red Wanting Blue connected with.

Lead singer, Scott Terry said, “Getting the chance to collaborate with Poco’s Rusty Young was a really special moment for us as a band. It’s a beautiful thing to get to share in an experience with an artist that you’ve looked up to and been inspired by. Our drummer Dean grew up listening to Poco with his Dad and so he brought their album A Good Feelin’ To Know on the road with us. Once he pressed play, we all received a fast education in Poco. Everybody was hooked! I have a lot of memories from those tours that are tied to that album. Poco had become a large part of our band’s tour soundtrack. ‘Go and Say Goodbye’ got played on repeat I don’t know how many times. Then we found ourselves getting the chance to be in a North Hollywood studio with Rusty Young re-recording that song with him. It was a little mind-blowing. We are so grateful that we all were able to share that experience with Rusty. I love the new version of the song and I hope we made him proud.”

Rusty Young , “It was so much fun to play with the guys in Red Wanting Blue on a Buffalo Springfield song that’s a classic. I’m sure was recorded before most of them were born. I love those guys! Great songs live on!”

Band Members
Scott Terry – vocals, tenor guitar, ukulele
Mark McCullough – bass, chapman stick, vocals
Greg Rahm – guitar, keyboards, vocals
Eric Hall – guitar, lap steel, vocals
Dean Anshutz – drums & percussion

we’re celebrating Pillar Of Na by releasing this one-take live version of the title track. It was recorded by our friend and longtime videographer Jon Washington at Musicol Studios in Columbus. Musicol is Ohio’s oldest studio and also a vinyl pressing plant.

Pillar of Na is Saintseneca’s most ambitious album to date, with Little aiming to incorporate genre elements he’d rarely heard in folk. “I wanted to use the idiom of folk-rock, or whatever you want to call it, and to try to do something that had never been done before,” Little explains. “To reach way back, echoing ancient folk melodies, tie that into punk rock, and then push it into the future. I told Mike Mogis I wanted Violent Femmes meets the new Blade Runner soundtrack. I’m looking for the intersection between Kendrick Lamar and The Fairport Convention.”

Memory is the common thread running throughout the Columbus folk-punk band’s fourth album, Pillar of Na, arriving in August 31st via ANTI- Records. Following 2015’s critically lauded Such Things, the new album’s name is rooted in remembrance, referencing the Genesis story of Lot’s wife who looks back at a burning Sodom after God instructs her not to. She looks back, and God turns her into a pillar of salt. “Na,” meanwhile, is the chemical symbol for sodium. “Nah” is a passive refusal and the universal song word. It means nothing and stands for nothing. It is “as it is.”

“Pillar of Na” (Live) by Saintseneca from the album ‘Pillar of Na,’

Band Members
Zac Little, Caeleigh Featherstone, Steve Ciolek, Jon Meador, Matthew O’Conke

The other big news is that our European tour starts next week in Oxford, England. It’ll be our first time over in 3 years and also our first time in places like Paris, so we’re majorly jazzed to be playing these songs for the first time in Europe.

Tour dates:
Nov 21: The Jericho Tavern – Oxford (UK)
Nov 22: Rabbit – Norwich (UK)
Nov 23: Hyde Park Book Club – Leeds (UK)
Nov 24: Broadcast – Glasgow (UK)
Nov 25: YES – Manchester (UK)
Nov 27: Sebright Arms – London (UK)

There’s a lot of heart in every project Maryn Jones touches. Her lyrics – which project struggles with self-doubt and depression, and a penchant for self-reliance, graceful and introspective. And her voice is powerfully expressive, whether combined with the muscular, fuzzy guitars of All Dogs – the indie punk band she fronts — or providing delicate harmonies for Saintseneca, the folk-rock group of which she’s a member. But often with those projects, the uniquely tender, vulnerable aspects of Jones‘ singing and songwriting run the risk of being buried, or, at the very least, not getting their chance to be heard.

Jones released an album called The Offer under the name Yowler in 2015, those facets were finally given space to be a centerpiece. The songs on The Offer are sparse, relying mainly on just Jones‘ voice and guitar. They’re deeply intimate and enveloping, both emotional and physical.

Maryn’s unique voice suits these songs perfectly. Here, I can’t get enough

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‘Sorry is Gone’ is available everywhere . The whole record is about me taking my life back, without really realizing it. I realized I’m the only person that is going to look out for me. I have to be my main person. No one else. I have to sing about things and write about things that have happened to me as therapy. That’s what connects me to other music I listen to. I want music to make me feel things. This is my inner dialogue, and my chance to get the last word.

Jessica Lea Mayfield might make some people uncomfortable with the level of honesty she projects on her forthcoming LP, “Sorry Is Gone”, but she’s not going to apologize – for that, or for anything else on her complex, confessional fourth album. Recorded with producer John Agnello (Sonic Youth, Kurt Vile, Phosphorescent and Dinosaur Jr.), Sorry Is Gone is a raw document of a woman in progress; one weathering cruel storms but finally able to blame the rain itself for the flood. Written as the truth of her own poisonous marriage unfolded before her eyes, Sorry Is Gone is a record of permission. Permission to create freely, to escape what is no longer safe and to stop bearing responsibility for things done to her, not by her. As Mayfield sings on the title track, “the sorry is gone.” Indeed, it is; kicked to the curb with every strum of her guitar.

Written in the years since her last solo LP, Make My Head Sing, in 2014, and her 2015 collaboration with Seth Avett and Jessica Lea Mayfield Sing Elliott Smith, Sorry Is Gone became the soundtrack to a highly personal and traumatic story. The Ohio-born Mayfield was quietly enduring years of domestic abuse, smiling and touring while she hid a brewing tempest – and the bruises, too. But lyrics don’t lie even as bruises fade, and they started to tell the tale of her marriage before she was even able to; songs often dark and dangerous and ready to confront and claim her life. Written primarily on an acoustic baritone guitar – out of necessity at first, in her thin-walled apartment – Mayfield started to process the years of hurt and uncertainly through words and melodies that helped her see the light in the darkness.

Though much of Make My Head Sing was written music-first, Sorry Is Gone began with those lyrics, and, so often, a path forward unfolded itself as the songs formed. “The cold hard truth is you love me too much,” she sings on “Meadow” a moody, echoey moment about finally realizing someone’s true colors. “The cold hard truth is you couldn’t love me enough.” It’s a brutal line from someone who refuses to be victimized. Evoking the pathos of nineties grunge, the folk confessions of her idol, Smith, and the cool blasé of bands like Luscious Jackson, the tracks that comprise Sorry Is Gone aren’t devised to make anyone comfortable but herself – but they are there to help share an emotional journal and a certain kind of healing that can only come through music.

“I have to sing about things and write about things that have happened to me as therapy,” says Mayfield, who shaped so many of these songs in the isolation of the small apartment she shared with her husband while their marriage fell apart in her hands – in many ways, those songs pointed to the way out before she could get there herself. “That’s what connects me to other music I listen to. I want music to make me feel things. This is my inner dialogue, and my chance to get the last word.”

Recorded with Agnello at Water Music and Electric Lady Studios, Mayfield recruited a stellar group of musicians for Sorry Is Gone, including Avett on backing vocals and keys, drummer Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth, Sun Kil Moon), bassist Emil Amos (Grails, Holy Sons), guitarist Cameron Deyell (Sia, Streets of Laredo) and Patrick Damphier (The Mynabirds, Field Days, who produced and played on “Offa My Hands”). Together, they worked to create an ominous take on love, where hope can exist among heartbreak and the end is only as finite as we make it to be. On songs like the title track and “Bum Me Out,” Mayfield bends the angelic notes of her voice over off-kilter orchestration, building an environment of warrior-style triumph; on “Safe 2 Connect 2” she takes stock of the digital world to a haunting, acoustic backdrop that gives a subtle ode to her bluegrass roots.

“Been though hell, there’s no telling what might happen in my future,” she sings. “All I can do is be thankful for each moment that’s my own.”

Mayfield has paved an unconventional lifestyle – playing in her family’s bluegrass band since the age of eight, she didn’t have any traditional schooling and released her first album at the age of fifteen, when she was discovered by Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys. Influenced by everything from that mountain sound to the modern garage, Mayfield has been able to come at songwriting from a pure perspective, lead more by her heart than any textbook. It’s what makes the tracks of Sorry Is Gone so striking and visceral – there is no filter on the emotions, no rulebook and certainly no excuses for anything she’s been through or the candor she fires.

“I’m not going to bite my lip on anything,” she says. “If there is one thing I am going to do, it’s talk and sing about what I want to. No one is going to manipulate me.”

The sorry is gone, once and for all – and Sorry Is Gone is a permission slip for anyone who wants to stop apologizing for others, and start living for themselves. ●

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Back in May, the Columbus-based folk-rock crew Saintseneca released a great one-off song, “Book Of The Dead On Sale,” and today they’ve followed it up with a new track called “Moon Barks At The Dog.” It’s a very pretty and melancholy one that sees the band howling over terse acoustic and a foreboding atmosphere, inviting you to “weep with me in 4/4 time,” which sounds like as good an idea as any. Columbus folk-rock outfit Saintseneca released this single in November and we can’t get enough of it. “Moon Barks at The Dog” is a stripped-down, mountain-folk ballad that showcases the synthesis of acoustic folk and indie rock the band has built their following on. This clever and contemplative new single wails.

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Band Members
Zac Little, Maryn Jones, Steve Ciolek, Jon Meador, Matthew O’Conke