Posts Tagged ‘Amelia Meath’

Mountain Man the trio of Amelia Meath, Alexandra Sauser-Monnig, and Molly Sarlé—releases Mountain Man “Sings Simple Gifts”, the latest in its series of cover singles, featuring its version of the 1848 Shaker hymn, today. The digital single follows previous editions in the Mountain Man “Sings” series, which also includes the band’s versions of Kacey Musgraves’ “Slow Burn,” Wilco’s “You and I,” John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads,” and the Irving Berlin holiday classic “White Christmas.” Last month, Nonesuch released Mountain Man’s live album, Look at Me Don’t Look at Me, recorded in November 2018 at Saint Mark’s Cathedral in Seattle.

“‘Simple Gifts’ is one of those incredible songs that transforms you while you sing it,” says the trio. “It’s like an incantation, and it was a joy to record.”

Our version of the Shaker hymn “Simple Gifts” is out everywhere today. “Simple Gifts” is one of those incredible songs that transforms you while you sing it. It’s like an incantation, and it was a joy to record.

Electronic duo and festival favourites Sylvan Esso will release their highly anticipated third LP later this month, and it feels like the perfect time to receive their buoyant, joyful, dance-inducing music. “It’s a record about being increasingly terrified of the world around you and looking inward to remember all the times when loving other people seemed so easy, so that you can find your way back to that place,” the pair said in a statement. Sylvan Esso is made up of Amelia Meath (who you also may know from her folk project Mountain Man) and producer Nick Sanborn. Their music has become increasingly polished over the years, first catching fire with more ambient songs like “Hey Mami” and “Coffee” on their 2014 self-titled debut and following it with 2017’s more pop-forward What Now. Free Love seems to position them somewhere in between those two sounds. Single “Ferris Wheel” is tremendously fun, but it’s also weirdly cleansing. Meath describes this phenomenon best: “Nick wants things to sound unsettling, but I want you to take your shirt off and dance.” There you have it.

We are thrilled to announce our third album, Free Love, will be out 9.25.20
It’s a record about being increasingly terrified of the world around you and looking inward to remember all the times when loving other people seemed so easy, so that you can find your way back to that place.
This first single, Ferris Wheel, is about discovering your power and awkwardly figuring out how to wield it. It’s for the summer, it’s for you, we hope you like it.

Nick Sanborn and Amelia Meath

Sylvan Esso  Nick Sanborn and Amelia Meath have shared a new single from their forthcoming album Free Love. “Frequency” arrives with an accompanying music video directed and styled by the group’s friend and collaborator Moses Sumney. Free Love marks Sylvan Esso’s third studio album, following the duo’s 2014 self-titled debut and 2017’s What Now. The new LP is out September 25 via Loma Vista, and it includes previously-shared tracks “Ferris Wheel” and “Rooftop Dancing.”

The video for “Frequency” was choreographed by North Carolina-based Stewart/Owen Dance. Of the visual, Sylvan Esso said in a press release:

We had a fantastic and rewarding time collaborating with our friend and fellow North Carolinian, Moses Sumney, on building a visual world for “Frequency.” He had such a beautiful vision for the project, one that ran parallel to the song’s initial source in a way that showed us new spaces it could inhabit. It’s a beautiful exploration of being together and apart at the same time—we feel it rings clearly in this moment.

New album Free Love out on September 25th

Folk trio and a capella angels Mountain Man—aka Sylvan Esso’s Amelia Meath, Daughter of Swords’ Alexandra Sauser-Monnig and Molly Sarlé have released a new live album called Look at Me Don’t Look at Me” recorded in November of 2018 at Saint Mark’s Cathedral in Seattle. It contains songs from their 2018 studio album Magic Ship, as well as covers of Fiona Apple’s “Hot Knife” and Michael Hurley’s “Blue Mountain,” which you can hear below.

The Look at Me Don’t Look at Me Tour was our first tour together in 10 years – it was a wild and magical ride and we are excited to share a live recording from a show we played at a beautiful verbed out church in Seattle! One of our favourite things in life is singing together to a bunch of people in a room. We hope this recording brings you some of the joy you may have been missing until the next time we can all be together.

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There are a lot of songs but also a lot of banter, and also a Fiona Apple cover, from Look At Me Don’t Look At Me, releases August 7th, 2020,

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Sylvan-Esso-What-If-Video

Sylvan Esso have shared the video for a mysterious new track, “What If”: a brief, minimal and enticing track, just a minute and a half long. Over spacious synth-bleeps, Amelia Meath sings, “Oh life, dying out/ And the oceans turn to clouds.” The music slowly swells up behind her, but it never quite crests. In the “What If” video, we see Meath singing as her head bobs in the ocean. The camera rises up over her until she’s just a small spot amidst nothingness.

It’s been more than three years since Sylvan Esso dropped their sophomore LP What Now, and it’s been more than two years since “PARAD(w/m)E,” their last proper stand-alone single. Back in April, however, the electro-pop duo from Durham, NC, premiered their concert film “With” on YouTube, while they surprised fans with an accompanying live album of the same name, via Loma Vista Recordings.

Both the album and film capture the final two nights of the band’s 2019 WITH tour at the Durham Performing Arts Center, in which Amelia Meath and Nick Sanborn were joined by a 10-piece band. The film also offers a behind-the-scenes look at the musicians as they prepare for the tour. The 16-track live album spans material from Sylvan Esso’s two studio albums – their self-titled 2014 debut and their acclaimed 2017 LP, What Now. In support of “With”, the duo performed an intimate three-song set from their home for NPR’s Tiny Desk (Home) Concert series.

Amelia Meath (formerly of Mountain Man) and Nick Sanborn (Megafaun, Made Of Oak) formed Sylvan Esso in 2013. They made their debut with the single “Hey Mami” and released their eponymous debut album on Partisan Records on May, 2014, which reached No. 39 on the Billboard 200. They released their second album What Now on April, 2017,

Mountain Man

Eight years since the release of their debut, the acclaimed trio Mountain Man return with a cover The trio Amelia Meath, Alexandra Sauser-Monnig, and Molly Sarlé have been doing a series of covers, and their latest is this beautiful, harmony-laden take on Kacey Musgrave’s “Slow Burn.” “We are all huge fans of Kacey Musgraves,” the trio says. “‘Slow Burn’ embodies the magic of the unfolding of life, the power of being present and patient and knowing that sometimes things just take time. Like following a thread—it requires attention and curiosity.”

Mountain Man – “Sings Kacey Musgraves”, Bella Union Records Released on: 2020-05-05

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Not since their 2010 debut Made The Harbor have Mountain Man released a record and toured, but, after each member found herself living in North Carolina following years of pursuing separate hustles, the three women—Alexandra Sauser-Monnig, Molly Sarlé and Sylvan Esso’s Amelia Meath—reignited their friendships, followed by their music. They officially rebooted the band at Justin Vernon’s Eaux Claires music festival in Wisconsin last summer, on a tiny stage in the middle of the forest, a perfect location for exhibiting Mountain Man’s campfire harmonies and gentle folk ballads. Their Wisconsin woods performance was serendipitous, validation that Mountain Man would be once more. “The magic felt as strong as it did the first time we sang together, and I think we were all really moved by that,” Sarlé says. Magic Ship feels as good to the listener as it does its makers. The eleven originals and three covers comprising the album feel like private poetry, but you’ve managed to sneak into Mountain Man’s secret clubhouse, just long enough to indulge in their soothing stash of acapella anthems and mellow mountain hymns. You can feel the bond between the three women. It’s there in the soft storytelling and playful commands of “Stella” and in their ultimate ode to comfort on “Underwear.” It’s there on “Slow Wake Up Sunday Morning,” which is as pleasant as it sounds, and in the soulful carol “Bright Morning Stars.” Cozy and uncomplicated, Magic Ship is the album you’ll want to listen to both in quiet solitude and in the company of friends.

The delightful dinner-party-set video for “Ring Tang Ring Toon” pretty much sums up all of Magic Ship’s warm and fuzzy feelings: Friends dance in a field, dine by candlelight and offer to help each other with the dishes. As on the record, harmony abounds

Mountain Man

Mountain Man‘s anticipated first album in eight years, Magic Ship, came in September via Nonesuch Records, . As the singles hinted, there’s some acappella stuff, some folky type stuff, and the whole thing is totally worth hearing. Mountain Man have also been touring, including a free record release show/signing at Rough Trade NYC on September 24th.

The highly anticipated follow-up to Made the Harbor doesn’t disappoint. On their magnificent new album for Nonesuch Records, Alexandra Sauser-Monnig, Amelia Meath, and Molly Sarle draw textured, hair-raising harmonies from a bountiful well of originals and covers, sung both with instrumentation and A Capella. There is a transportive quality to their voices and to these recordings. As soon the sisters start, the listener is carried to the back porch of a small farmhouse at the end of a dirt road, or to the top of a knoll as the fog lifts at daybreak. Magic that could have been tracked by Ferris or Lomax. The perfect tonic for these chaotic times.

Mountain Man member Amelia Meath also has upcoming dates with her band Sylvan Esso.

‘Magic Ship’ is the new album from Mountain Man, out 21st September via Bella Union.

And listen to the tracks, ‘Window’, ‘Stella’ and ‘Ring Tang Toon’

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Grammy-nominated electro duo Sylvan Esso live-debuted a new tune on last night’s Jimmy Kimmel Live!, performing “PARAD(w/m)E” (just pronounced “parade”) and following up with a lyric video for the track on Friday.

Amber Coffman (formerly of Dirty Projectors) and Wye Oak’s Jenn Wasner contributed backing vocals (and claps) for Sylvan Esso’s Kimmel performance. “P-a-r-a-d with me,” Amelia Meath commands over a characteristically bouncy Nick Sanborn beat. Take a closer listen, however, and “PARAD(w/m)E” reveals itself to be as dark as it is danceable.

Sylvan Esso’s strong sophomore album What Now earned the duo a Grammy nod for best dance/electronic album, and rightfully so. Kayleigh Hughes hailed What Now’s “fuller, darker, and more chaotic sound” .

Watch Sylvan Esso’s “PARAD(w/m)E” lyric video below, The duo has an extensive 2018 tour planned.

When you listen to Sylvan Esso singer and lyricist Amelia Meath talk about the band’s new album, “What Now”, you quickly learn how profoundly she’s motivated by love. There’s the love of magical sounds and the euphoria she feels when music “lifts you off the earth.” There’s the love for the audience, of connecting with and freeing them through song. And, especially for Meath, there’s the love of dance and of feeling the body (literally) become the music.

The release of What Now, we asked Meath to share some of the stories behind the new songs. She revealed a lot about what went into each track, but also reflected on the kinds of things that can keep her up at night, like whether being in a band matters when there’s more important work to do, how she’s sometimes sad when everything is awesome and how flagrant sexism in the music industry can ruin everything.

“Lyrically, this is mostly me talking to myself. Hilariously enough this song is on the radio now, but at the time I was feeling an immense amount of pressure to write new songs for What Now even though we were still mid-cycle on our first record. Most of the song is spent accusing myself of trying to become a successful musician when there are so many other important things to be doing other than sucking up to the man, trying to get America to think you are cool. Also — getting on mainstream radio is like trying to join a secret society, particularly if you are female. Stations have literally come back to us saying that they already have ‘a female vocal’ in their playlist.

5. Kick Jump Twist

“This is about jumping through hoops trying to get people to love you. Be it practicing your dance moves and sexy face in the mirror, or prepping your audition for RuPaul’s Drag Race. It’s a song about how we perform our lives — and also, about being in a band and touring forever.”

6. Song

“My favorite manifestation of heartache is wanting to be a piece of music. As in, actually being so filled with emotion and energy that you leave your human body and transcend into pure melody. For real. That is what this tune is about, as well as the reality of being in love versus what love songs and rom-coms tell us love is like — how sometimes a song can make you feel more in love than the real thing. Or at least it gives you a moment to completely feel it, without distraction.”

7. Just Dancing

“I wanted to talk about how Tinder has made it possible to only go on first dates forever. How all of the sudden it is completely possible to be in control of how potential romantic partners see you. How if you wanted to, you could be your own most ideal version of yourself. But you would have to keep on changing who you were dating to keep that beginning of a relationship feeling. How you could live in this false image of yourself, reflected through your partners’ eyes, never landing.”

8. Signal

“It’s about life mimicking technology and technology mimicking life. Searching for truth and honesty in a sea of noise. How, despite all the changes to the ways we go about it, we all still want the same thing any human has ever wanted: to be, connect with other humans and feel understood.

9. Slack Jaw

“Everything is awesome — and I am still sad.”

10. Rewind

“This is about me watching scenes from movies over and over again when I was a kid, learning turns of phrases and dance moves, and how to be a person. The chorus is about repeated viewings on VHS — how when you are rewinding something the picture dims and when you press ‘play,’ the room floods with light again. It is about building your personality from media, and then slowly dismantling it to become an honest human and an amalgamation of your influences from family, friends, movies, music and idols.”