Posts Tagged ‘Nandi Rose’

Half Waif Mirah

Half Waif has recorded a rendition of Mirah’s “Murphy Bed.” The cover will appear on a tribute album accompanying the 20th anniversary reissue of Mirah’s debut LP “You Think It’s Like This But Really It’s Like This” (out July 31 via Double Double Whammy). Listen to Half Waif’s version of the song, as well as the remastered original by Mirah, below.

“It was a huge honour to record a cover for the legendary Mirah in celebration of this 20th anniversary reissue,” Half Waif’s Nandi Rose said of her recording.

I chose “Murphy Bed” because I could immediately hear the chorus being reimagined as a more choral-focused arrangement. There’s also something obviously sensual about this song lyrically, so I wanted to play that up with the slow backbeat and just have some fun with it. I’m really grateful to Mirah for her fearless song-writing, and I loved getting to interpret that with my own arrangement.

You Think It’s Like This But Really It’s Like This was originally released in 2000 by K Records. In addition to a remastered version of the original album (co-produced by Phil Elverum), the tribute album features covers by Mount Eerie (“Of Pressure”), Shamir, Sad13, Allison Crutchfield, Hand Habits, Palehound, Flock of Dimes, Mal Blum, WHY?, and many others.

the 20th Anniversary Reissue of “You Think It’s Like This, But Really It’s Like This” including a covers compilation. Available July 31st on Double Double Whammy.

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Half Waif Nandi Rose is on her own again, and three songs into her forthcoming album “The Caretaker”, the singer, songwriter and producer declares her fearlessness: “Baby don’t worry about me, I don’t worry about you.” Here, on “Ordinary Talk,” Rose meditates on the heaviness of ordinary moments, the constellation of tears and chores and self-doubt and small talk that comprise being a person, accompanied by her most cinematic, pulsing arrangements to date. It’s an apt introduction to The Caretaker, an ax-lbum that negotiates the space between working alone and with others, between isolation and connection. The result is her boldest work yet. Over the course of eleven songs, Rose creates the lush world of a humid summer night, dreaming of and reaching for a season in which she is her “best self.”

Nandi Rose’s music has expanded from bucolic soundscapes into icier portraits. On 2014’s Kotekan and 2016’s Probable Depths, Rose’s strings, pianos and powerful mezzo-soprano provided an appropriately plaintive background for her ruminations on distance and personal growth. For 2017’s boxy form/a EP and 2018’s grief-stricken Lavender, she embraced synths that resembled icicles falling onto a patio and shattering—an element previously scattered, but not placed front and center, throughout her work—in service of songs as thoughtfully composed as they were towering and immediate. Rose’s Lavender follow-up The Caretaker is smaller in scale.

The album often resembles a reversion to her sparser early work and away from the cavernous jolts of her more recent output. As Rose embraces her craft’s most hermit-like aspects, she consolidates her long time fascinations with change and disconnectedness into grim portraits of whom she becomes when she doesn’t maintain her closest relationships and properly tend to (the ever-marketable art of) self-care. Understandably, The Caretaker’s stories are often not pretty sights, even if the music always is. On “Blinking Light,” a synth-pop ballad that flows like a gentle stream, Rose describes circling the drain and leaving texts unread, and though the image of a neglectful Rose is bleak, the song’s slow glide toward her belting away her agony is equally somber and invigorating. Throughout “In August,” she looks back despondently on the fallout of a once-strong companionship: “I have lost your friendship / What does that say about me?” As pillowy synths burst into a mournful geyser of sound, the track takes on a rejuvenating air.

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Half Waif is singer-songwriter Nandi Rose. Her new album The Caretaker, her first for ANTI-Records, is named for a fictional character, “someone who has been entrusted with taking care of this estate, taking care of the land, and she’s not doing a very good job,” Rose said. “The weeds are growing everywhere, and she’s not taking care of herself.” Check out Half Waif’s “Halogen 2” video. The last album was so much about protecting myself – facing the night, bearing teeth and howling, shutting down an apocalypse, all so I could contain my world and build a fragrant shelter. I asked to be buried in the mother’s arms. But then I read Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer, and I felt it change my life. My shelter was here all along, in the embrace of the weeping pine and the scalloped leaves who wave to me in the wind. I have never felt so at home. And now it is time to be a mother and a caretaker, to nourish myself by opening my heart to others, to all people – human, plant, animal, everything endowed with the spark of life and the will to survive.

Growing up means better understanding what you need. For me, right now, that’s a sweet summer of being a nobody, humble before the fierce kindness of these trees.

With a new album that was scheduled out on March 27th, I had lined up a New York release show and a subsequent North American headline tour—shows that had been in the works since last fall. This is my first record since signing with a new label, ANTI-Records, and I’d been banking on these headline shows (my first in over a year and biggest to date) to help build momentum around the release. Instead I spent an afternoon last week deleting all the events from my Google calendar one by one, feeling something crumble with every click. Disappointment made visual: this won’t happen, and this, and this. Entire blocks of colors disappeared, leaving behind a blank gray grid. What was worse was breaking the news to my band members and touring crew, knowing they were counting on these shows for income. Of course it wasn’t anything I could control, but it’s still devastating to know that the domino effect of this dismantling machine means we all fall down.

“Clouds Rest” by Half Waif from the album ‘The Caretaker,’ available now

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Nandi Rose has shared this synthy mood piece from her upcoming Half Waif album The Caretaker which is out March 27 via ANTI-Records . “‘Halogen 2′ is a song about isolation and the search for strength,” says Nandi. “The halogens are some of the most reactive elements on the periodic table, and in this song, winter and a life alone in the country are like halogen: an unrelenting force that produces change. I wrote this song at home in Upstate New York last March at a time when my sense of isolation was at its height. And yet I’ve always been someone who loves my alone time, so there was a sense of shame that I couldn’t handle it this time. I needed to tell myself and anyone witnessing my restlessness: ‘Don’t misunderstand, I do what I must.’ Nearly a year after writing the song, we shot most of the music video in the same location: my house and yard. The two opposing feelings presented by the verses and choruses are represented visually in the Blue World of cold, stagnant country life and the Orange World of the unfettered, fiery strength that lies beneath.

“Halogen 2” by Half Waif from the album ‘The Caretaker,’ available March 27th