Posts Tagged ‘Mirage’

Taking their moniker from the notion of ‘Liberation Upon Hearing In The Between’ from the Tibetan Book Of The Dead, Josefin Öhrn + The Liberation’ took little time to make their mark on the wider world, brandishing a radiant sound that stands effortlessly apart from the increasingly staid and often paradoxically predictable world of modern psychedelia.

Having already been nominated for a Swedish Grammy with their debut EP, Diamond Waves, their full-length 2015 debut on Rocket Recordings, Horse Dance marked out a territory in which beguiling repetition could sashay with sweet pop suss, melodic flourishes with experimental intensity, and it was summarily rapturously received on arrival, making new fans like 6 Music’s Lauren Laverne and earning them appearances at Roskilde Festival and Eindhoven Psych Lab.

Yet clearly this was only the beginning of a journey of discovery ,and few would have guessed how the band’s sound would quickly evolve into still more enchanting and enlightening strains. Their second effort Mirage, which follows a mere year after its predecessor, sees the band sculpting sprawling, hypnotic jams into elegant nocturnal serenades with such serendipity that their actual creation remains a little hazy even to themselves. “We agree on not remembering very much about how these tracks came about, that all of them were written on the road and that most of them came fully formed” note the band. “Most were really long to begin with, but we found it relieving to break away a bit from the mandatory psych jams a little bit. We also just realised that none of them were written in daylight, which might be why memory is so elusive.”

Indeed, this hypnagogic approach seems to fit well with the primary inspiration for the five-piece, which centred on ‘the state where dreams, visions and the present are entwined’ – the domain of surrealists and mystics, not to mention cinematic epiphanies such as Morgiana, Daisies and Tarkovsky’s Solaris.

True to form, Mirage see the band taking a chic tradition of avant-pop that extends all the way from Serge Gainsbourg and Françoise Hardy to Broadcast and Saint Etienne, and warping it mercilessly to their own darker ends.

Whilst the brooding yet sultry ‘Sister Green Eyes’ is no less than a sharp slice of velveteen motorik-pop and ‘Looking For You’ reinvents three-chord garage-rock attack with mighty finesse, The Liberation are just as comfortable dealing out the heavy-lidded and electronically-driven ‘In Madrid’ or the dive in the hallucinatory deep end of ‘Circular Motion’, on which they’re aided and abetted by Lay Llamas’ Nicola Guinta.

Fresh excitement for the band lies in wait, courtesy of a UK tour with Goat and an appearance at Liverpool International Festival Of Psychedelia, yet amidst the psychic forces responsible for this kaleidoscopic effort who can say what will follow. “Horse Dance was very much about conjuring the strength needed to cut ties” the band elucidate. “Mirage may be about having left but having no clue what’s next – the power in being completely lost and thriving on it” Yet the seductive splendour of these ten songs åmake manifest a parallel world of disorientation and deliverance in which one would be a fool not to want to languish adrift.

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‘The State (I’m In)’ is Josefin Öhrn + The Liberation’s second single from their new album ‘Mirage’.

After an amazing 2016 which saw the release of the bands 2nd album ‘Mirage’, the seductive splendour of these ten songs were jubilantly received across UK Radio’s BBC6 Music, climaxing in a Lauren Laverne BBC6 Live session and a full tour support with fellow Swedes ‘Goat’.

The State (I’m In) has a sense of disorientation that marries a kaleidoscopic aesthetic with a panoramic sensibility, it’s overdriven organ motif radiance is offset by hypnotic rhythmic drive that steadily pulsates throughout.

The track encircles as if the The Doors were jettisoned in a floatian tank with Spacemen 3/ Suicide, Josefin’s luscious vocals fluctuating like an enchanted mantra until every single atom has fallen into perfect alignment and formed perfect shape.

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The B side features a Remix by Al Lover of the bands classic ‘Rushing Through My Mind’, this time forging the ethereal sound of the original layered with strings and some really funky Kraut-Disco basslined grooves.

‘Mirage’ is currently available worldwide & the single ‘The State (I’m In) / Rushing Through My Mind (Al Lover Remix)’ is released digitally on 16th December, both are released via Rocket Recordings.

Josefin Öhrn + The Liberation will be embarking on a UK tour throughout March 2017.

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To coincide with their upcoming tour (see dates below), Josefin Öhrn + The Liberation will be releasing a gorgeous, reworked version of their sultry album track, Sister Green Eyes, this will be the band’s third single from last year’s excellent album Mirage.

Sister Green Eyes sensuously throbs to a more Eastern drive, with an sedated Velvet’s droned melody, and a fluctuating groove straight out of the CAN little black book.

Part tribal, part gothic groove and richly hypnotic, the track was inspired by the Japanese word “Shinrinyoku” which is sometimes translated and often described as “Forest Bathing”, where submersing oneself so deeply into the atmosphere of the forest or in the band’s case, the Swedish ‘Ocean and Mountains’, that the experience is rejuvenating and restorative so showing you a way that can often seem lost or out of reach and Josefin’s breathless, broken vocals encapsulate that.

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The single will be released on Rocket Recordings on 24th February (digital only).

Tour Dates 

24 Feb / Nottingham / Nottingham Contemporary
25 Feb / Liverpool / Liverpool Central Library
26 Feb / Newcastle / The Cluny
28 Feb / Glasgow / Broadcast
1 March / Manchester / The Soup Kitchen
2 March / Leeds / The Brudenell Social Club
3 March / Bristol / Louisiana
4 March / London / Moth Club
5 March / Brighton / Haunt
6 March / Oxford / The Bullingdon
7 March / Birmingham / Hare & Hounds

 

Having already been nominated for a Swedish Grammy with their debut EP, Diamond Waves, their debut full-length 2015 on Rocket Recordings, “Horse Dance”, marked out a territory in which beguiling repetition could sashay with sweet pop sounds, melodic flourishes with experimental intensity, and it was summarily rapturously received on arrival, making new fans and earning them appearances at Roskilde Festival and Eindhoven Psych Lab.

http://

This their second full lenth effort “Mirage”, which follows a mere year after its predecessor, sees the band sculpting sprawling, hypnotic jams into elegant nocturnal serenades. “We agree on not remembering very much about how these tracks came about, that all of them were written on the road and that most of them came fully formed” note the band. “Most were really long to begin with, but we found it relieving to break away a bit from the mandatory psych jams a little bit.

http://

We also just realised that none of them were written in daylight, which might be why memory is so elusive.” Indeed, this approach seems to fit well with the primary inspiration for the five-piece band, which centred on ‘the state where dreams, visions and the present are entwined’ .“Mirage” sees the band taking a chic tradition of avant-pop that extends all the way from Serge Gainsbourg and Françoise Hardy to Broadcast and Saint Etienne, and warping it mercilessly to their own darker ends. Whilst the brooding yet sultry ‘Sister Green Eyes’ is no less than a sharp slice of motorik-pop and ‘Looking For You’ reinvents three-chord garage-rock attack with mighty finesse, The Liberation are just as comfortable dealing out the heavy-lidded and electronically-driven ‘In Madrid’ or the dive in the hallucinatory deep end of ‘Circular Motion’, on which they’re aided and abetted by the Lay Llamas’ Nicola Guinta. The seductive splendour of these ten songs å make manifest a parallel world of disorientation and deliverance in which one would be a fool not to want to languish adrift . Fresh excitement for the band lies in wait, courtesy of a UK tour with Goat and an appearance at Liverpool International Festival Of Psychedelia.

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The latest offering from impending second album ‘Mirage’, released today via Rocket Recordings. Josefin’s sultry voice intoxicates over a realm of seductive instrumentation. On tour in Europe now, they head to UK for five dates kicking off on October 17th at Brighton’s All Saints Church.

Josefin Öhrn + The Liberation – Rushing Through My Mind

Warner Bros. Records

Fleetwood Mac‘s last No. 1 album, 1982’s Mirage, will be released as a three-disc expanded deluxe edition this week.
Mirage – which followed 1979’s Tusk, an expensive LP that didn’t reach nearly the same heights as its predecessor, the blockbuster Rumours – but included three Top 40 singles: “Hold Me,” which hit No. 4, “Gypsy” and “Love in Store.”
The new reissue, will include a new remaster of the original album; a disc of B-sides, outtakes and sessions; and 13 songs from the 1982 tour in support of the album. You can see the entire track listing below.
Like the recent deluxe reissues of Rumours and Tusk, the beefed-up Mirage will be available in a number of configurations, including the three-disc edition that will also include an LP and DVD, which features a 5.1 surround mix; a two-disc expanded version that omits the live CD; and remastered albums on disc and digital.
The album was recorded as a reaction of sorts to the ambitious Tusk, settling for more stripped-down arrangements. It paid off for the band, staying at No. 1 for five weeks whereas Tusk stalled at No. 4. Among the 19 tracks found on the reissue’s second disc are early versions and alternate takes of songs like “Love in Store,” “Only Over You” and “Oh Diane.” The “Video Version” of “Gypsy,” which runs a minute longer than the album take, is also included.

But the real excitement is relegated to the pricey “deluxe” package that includes not only a 5.1 surround audio-only DVD of the album and a remastered vinyl reproduction, but a live show from the ‘82 Mirage tour. This 74-minute concert catches the band on a particularly inspired and improvisation filled night in LA as Mirage was ensconced atop the Billboard charts. It kicks off with a propulsive seven-minute “The Chain” that smokes the studio take into oblivion and features extended performances of two Tusk tracks with a nearly 10-minute “Not That Funny” along with another 8 minutes of “Sisters of the Moon,” closing with an unplugged emotional “Songbird” all in front of a clearly engaged audience.
The live disc, in addition to several Mirage tracks, includes older favorites like “The Chain,” “Rhiannon” and “Go Your Own Way.”

Having failed to include the already available 5.1 mix of Fleetwood Mac‘s Rumours in their 2013 super deluxe edition Warners haven’t made the same mistake with last year’s Tusk box or the forthcoming Mirage set which was announced this week…
The Mirage box looks like a satisfying package • Despite all the content (outtakes, live, etc.) the Mirage box fails to include the seven-inch of Gypsy,

• The DVD looks to be an audio-only affair. Why not include the videos to Hold Me and Gypsy? It’s perfectly feasible to mix a 5.1 mix with video content.

• And why is it a DVD and not a blu-ray audio? Warners have used the format for Van Morrison and Crosby Stills Nash & Young so why not Fleetwood Mac? Presumably, the label would argue that the widespread appeal of the band isn’t aligned with blu-ray audio which might be considered ‘niche’ and of interest largely to super-fans and audiophiles. Maybe, but having gone to the effort of creating a 5.1 mix, why wouldn’t you want to show it off at it’s best, with lossless surround sound?

The biggest sin is to continue to bundle vinyl into the super deluxe box. Vinyl, like blu-ray audio is niche, but that hasn’t stopped it being included. For many people the vinyl will be superfluous.
Fleetwood Mac, ‘Mirage: Deluxe Edition’ Track Listing
Disc One: Original Album – 2016 Remaster
1. “Love In Store”
2. “Can’t Go Back”
3. “That’s Alright”
4. “Book of Love”
5. “Gypsy”
6. “Only Over You”
7. “Empire State”
8. “Straight Back”
9. “Hold Me”
10. “Oh Diane”
11. “Eyes of the World”
12. “Wish You Were Here”
Disc Two: B-Sides, Outtakes, Sessions
1. “Love In Store” (Early Version)*
2. “Suma’s Walk” AKA “Can’t Go Back” (Outtake)*
3. “That’s Alright” (Alternate Take)*
4. “Book of Love” (Early Version)*
5. “Gypsy” (Early Version)*
6. “Only Over You” (Alternate Version)*
7. “Empire State” (Early Version)*
8. “If You Were My Love” (Outtake)*
9. “Hold Me” (Early Version)*
10. “Oh Diane” (Early Version)*
11. “Smile at You” (Outtake)*
12. “Goodbye Angel” (Original Outtake)*
13. “Eyes of the World” (Alternate Early Version)*
14. “Wish You Were Here” (Alternate Version)*
15. “Cool Water”
16. “Gypsy” (Video Version)
17. “Put a Candle in the Window” (Run-Through)*
18. “Teen Beat” (Outtake)*
19. “Blue Monday” (Jam)*
*Previously Unissued
Disc Three: Mirage Live 1982
1. “The Chain”
2. “Gypsy”
3. “Love In Store”
4. “Not That Funny”
5. “You Make Loving Fun”
6. “I’m So Afraid”
7. “Blue Letter”
8. “Rhiannon”
9. “Tusk”
10. “Eyes of the World”
11. “Go Your Own Way”
12. “Sisters of the Moon”
13. “Songbird”

Caught On Tape: Fleetwood Mac Hit The Studio, And Their “Gypsy” Demo Is Unbelievable | Society Of Rock Videos

Fleetwood Mac are one of the only bands whose rarities and outtakes are good enough to make us wish they’d included them on each albums, This rare demo version of ‘Gypsy’ is absolutely beautiful; instead of a full band behind Stevie Nicks, she’s accompanied by only an electric keyboard playing softly in the background, giving ‘Gypsy’ an ethereal, almost dreamlike feel to it.

There are two points of inspiration behind ‘Gypsy’, as stated by Stevie Nicks. The first of which is a point of nostalgia for Nicks: her life before Fleetwood Mac, and the second being a tribute to someone’s passing.

Stevie Nicks wrote this as a tribute to her friend Robin who at the time wa dying from leukemia.

This demo of ‘Gypsy’ is one that very well could have stood on its own as a track on the album, or even as a B-side. Especially knowing that it’s about a dear friend of Stevie’s, the ethereal factor would have definitely worked as opposed to something a little more upbeat. In any event, ‘Gypsy’ still remains one of our favorite Fleetwood Mac songs, in any of its forms!

Stevie Nicks wrote the song originally around. 1979, and the earliest demo recordings were recorded in early 1980 with Tom Moncrieff for possible inclusion on her solo debut “Bella Donna”.  However, when Nicks’ friend Robin Anderson died of  leukemia, the song took on a new significance and Nicks held it over for Fleetwood Mac. “Gypsy” was the second single release and second biggest hit from the “Mirage” album,

The video for this song was the highest-budget music video ever produced at the time. It used several locations including a highly detailed portrayal of a forest, and required many costumes and dancers.

Stevie Nicks especially remembers the experience as unpleasant. Two weeks beforehand, she had gone into rehab to attempt to end her cocaine addiction. However, the video shoot could not be rescheduled, and she had to take a break for it. Near the end of the first of three days, she was exhausted and said she wanted some cocaine. A small bottle that was discreetly brought to her was later thrown out before she could use any.

Those issues were further strained by having to work closely with former boyfriend, Lindsay Buckingham. “We weren’t getting along well then. I didn’t want to be anywhere near him; I certainly didn’t want to be in his arms,” she says of the scene where the two are dancing. “If you watch the video, you’ll see I wasn’t happy. And he wasn’t a very good dancer.

On March 25, 2009 during a show in Montreal on Fleetwood Mac’s Unleashed Tour, Stevie Nicks gave a short history of the inspiration behind Gypsy. She explained it was written sometime in 1978-79, when the band had become “very famous, very fast,” and it was a song that brought her back to an earlier time, to an apartment in San Francisco where she had taken the mattress off her bed and put it on the floor. To contextualize, she voiced the lyrics: “So I’m back, to the velvet underground. Back to the floor, that I love. To a room with some lace and paper flowers. Back to the gypsy that I was.” Those are the words: ‘So I’m back to the velvet underground’—which is a clothing store in downtown San Francisco, where Janis Joplin got her clothes, and Grace Slick from Jefferson Airplane. It was this little hole in the wall, amazing, beautiful stuff—’back to the floor that I love, to a room with some lace and paper flowers, back to the gypsy that I was.'”