Posts Tagged ‘Melodic Records’

Cool Ghouls – a band fledged in San Francisco on house shows, minimum wage jobs, BBQ’s in Golden Gate Park and the romance of a city’s psychedelic history turns 10 this year. What better a decennial celebration than the release of their fourth album, At George’s Zoo!

How did this San Francisco’s fab four arrive at George’s Zoo? The teenage friendship of complimentary spirits Pat McDonald (Guitar/Vox) and Pat Thomas (Bass/Vox) serves as square one. The Pat’s were munching on Eggo-waffle-sandwiches and downing warm Taaka in suburban Benicia years before McDonald would hear George Clinton address his fans as “Cool Ghouls”. The boys played their debut gig as Cool Ghouls at San Francisco’s legendary The Stud in 2011, but there’s no doubt the musical moment cementing the band’s trajectory was much earlier at the 18th birthday party for boy-wonder Ryan Wong (Guitar/Vox) – at the Wong household.

The Ghouls’ earliest days… McDonald’s hair hung luxuriously past his waist, Thomas dreamt of no longer having to crash on friends’ couches to call SF home and Wong looked forward to turning 21. Cool Ghouls’ Cody Voorhees, thrashed wildly – but briefly – on the drums and Alex Fleshman (Drums), who still claims he’s not really “a drummer”, turned out to be a really good drummer.

Flash forward to today and everything is up in flames. No shows, parties or bars. Cool people are streaming out of SF. It’s been 2 years since the last time Cool Ghouls have even played. 

Fortunately for us, the ghouls got an album in before it all went to shit, and they made it count. At George’s Zoo includes 15 of the 27 tunes they managed to eke out while simultaneously working through major life moves. It was a 5-month, all out, final sprint down the homestretch (to Ryan’s moving day) with affable engineer Robby Joseph, at his makeshift garage studio in the Outer Sunset (pictured on the cover). Instead of recording the entire album over a few consecutive days – like they’d done with Tim Cohen, Sonny Smith and Kelley Stoltz for the first three LPs – the band took it slow by working through a few songs each weekend after rehearsing them the week before. 

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These guys have a real commitment to elevating as songwriters, musicians and ensemble players. It’s always been for the music with Cool Ghouls and this long-awaited self-produced outing is a track by track display of the ground they’ve covered and heights they can achieve. Their vocals and trademark harmonies are front and center and out-of-control-good. Ryan’s guitar solos are incredible. The horns by Danny Brown (sax) and Andrew Stephens (trumpet) hit in all the right places. Maestro, Henry Baker (Pat Thomas Band / Tino Drima), plays keys throughout. There’s even a mesmerizing string section (“Land Song”) by sonic polyglot, Dylan Edrich.

This is a fully realized Cool Ghouls album. It paints a remarkable portrait of SF’s homegrown heroes and the many corners they’ve explored over the last decade. The song writing, harmony and playing are nothing if not solid. The lyrics are keen. Robby’s recording and mixing sound great start to finish and even better after mastering by Mikey Young. It’s a triumphant addition to their catalogue. Recommended for Stooges and Beach Boys fans alike. We at least know that 2021 has At George’s Zoo for us, a beautiful keepsake from the Before Times when we used to stand in living rooms together while bands played.

Available March 12th on LP / CD / Digital via Empty Cellar Records and Melodic Records worldwide. 

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The Cool Greenhouse know comedy gold when they see it. “Alexa!” very humorously mocks those smart spearkers that folks can’t seem to live without. Alexa, email my credit card details to my contacts list. Alexa, open the pod bay doors. You get the idea. Cortana makes a guest appearance and the Cool Greenhouse continue to employ repetition (They are repeatedly making great records) to their advantage.

“Alexa!” Set the alarm for 3AM! Limited Edition 7″ vinyl available for pre-order via Melodic Records. https://www.melodic.co.uk/product/the… Written by The Cool Greenhouse. Produced by Phil Booth & The Cool Greenhouse.

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“We just want to confuse the fuck out of people, in a good way,” said Working Men’s Club frontman Sydney Minsky-Sargeant. Mission accomplished. The band’s self-titled debut draws from a large swath of danceable ’79-’83 post punk and second-gen ’00s groups, with great songs, infectious beat-heavy production and a clear love for The Fall.

It’s old music for young people and young music for old people. It’s the sound of teenage possibilities current or remembered. we’re discovering house music in New York with New Order, riding the night train in Germany looking for Kraftwerk with Simple Minds, out of our minds and sticking to the floors of the Hacienda. our tour guide is Sydney Minsky-Sargeant who reacquaints us with what has been before whilst giving us something tangibly modern by navigating an untrodden route through those familiar places. This Yorkshire indie-guitar turned synth-techno band stormed into our lives in early 2019 with the razor-sharp post-punk of their debut ‘Bad Blood’ (released via Melodic Records) – kicking off our obsession with their output, it turned out not to be a blueprint for the direction the ensuing album would take however, for when they emerged a year later with the irrepressible propulsion of ‘Teeth,’ it felt like we were dealing with quite a different band. But it transpires that we pretty much were, as Syd was the only remaining member of the original set up. With a band of new recruits consisting of Drenge’s Rob Graham and Moonlandingz’s Mairead O’Connor (whose influence feels like it permeates ‘Tomorrow’ and ‘Cook a Coffee’) – Syd drew further on his dance influences (Justin Robertson, 808 state, Jeff Mills and Soulwax) to pursue more heuristic grooves. . acid house, rave culture, Detroit techno, Italian sleazy house. “it’s almost like the difference between ’81 New Order and ’89 New Order , but achieved in the space of a year” – the line of best fit.

Although a majority of the album is a riot of hard electronic beats, everything is cut through with an industrial, post-punk grit that keeps this firmly rooted in sweaty northern basement clubs and not on shiny, well-lit dancefloors – a collision of euphoric rave and stomping claustrophobia. how is it possible that someone so young can have such an affinity for – and  knowledge of – the entire 80s indie dance scene?.

Savage and stylish, I absolutely love the hedonistic rush of rising dark synth-pop stars Working Men’s Club. Choosing to play along to a drum machine can be a wee bit stifling during most live performances, but for Working Men’s Club it ensures their sets remain tightly wound which retains their razor-sharp edge on stage.

Finding a home on the iconic label Heavenly Recordings, the West Yorkshire band have already released “Bad Blood” that has that killer bass line and the truly infectious “Teeth” which is most definitely my single of the year. they exhibit a level of cynicism and alienation only possessed by the young but here it’s channelled into a music that sticks two fingers up at any musical age discrimination: old acid-head ravers stand up! industrial goths indulge! nostalgic grown-up indie kids get yer converse on.

It’s an album of contradictions and juxtapositions. despite the influences spanning decades and genres, it smartly coalesces into a fluent and vitally modern whole, whilst simultaneously retaining the sense of this being a mixtape you’re listening to in your best mate’s bedroom in the early 90s; the lyrics predominantly focus on fatalism, imprisonment and despair whilst the music is imbued with hope, freedom and redemption; it’s music for the elation of the dance floor that works equally as well as a headphones listen slumped in your armchair; it’s full of fervour and vivacity but delivered with a piercing, icy stare and a tone of ennui. it’s this friction, this tension, this opposition, that makes this album so compelling.

like Fat White Family partying with the Happy Mondays and then hooking up with Suicide for an after party at Gary Numan’s pad, this is a cross-generational, cross-genre masterpiece that reverberates with the enthusiasm of a house party but resonates with the maturity of a dinner party. it’s odd that a record which evokes club culture, energy and togetherness doesn’t make you miss what you can’t have, but instead celebrates what you can. The whole Working Men’s Club aesthetic is steeped in 90s rave culture – the acid house smiley, the flouro colours, their iconic dancing kanji logo – it’s the return to freer times we’re all craving so much right now. their frenetic energy brings a much-needed adrenalin shot to the tail end of a year that damn well needs it.

We are hearing reports they’ll be sticking with Jeff Barrett for the release of their debut album early next year and I need a copy now.

“[a] potent set of bruising electro songs like a cool composite of stephen mallinder and mark e smith” – uncut.

“packed with gurgling, yelping energy” – the line of best fit

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The Cool Greenhouse play hypnotic, home-brew postpunk with an almighty lyric bite. Having released a handful of celebrated 7’’s and EPs on DIY labels such as Lumpy Records, Market Square and Drunken Sailor over the past few years, the 29th May will  see the release of their much-anticipated debut studio album on Melodic Records. Initially focussing on their bedroomatic lo-fi home-recordings, last year the band emerged from their hovel as a full line-up, disorientating and delighting their audiences in equal measure.

The Cool Greenhouse, my new favourite post-everything existential music happening. Hooray!” – Henry Rollins
The Cool Greenhouse exist in diametric opposition to me and you and our stupid short attention spans.” – The Quietus
Those in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones, but The Cool Greenhouse are about to shatter glass ceilings with their self-titled debut LP.

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Having caused a stir on the underground DIY label circuit with their inimitable, infectious brand of lo-fi post-punk in 2019, The Cool Greenhouse’s debut album shows off a newly developed, fuller sound, taking their signature style to previously unexplored heights while doubling down on their tried and tested formula of angular motoric riffs and no holds barred biting social commentary. The muffled 16-bit drum loops have been replaced with a full kit, the nonchalant vocal delivery has found a new edge and the sparse instrumentation has been augmented by the band’s finally agreeing to leave their bedrooms and enter the studio, yielding a fully-realised vision with fresh clarity and depth that makes their earlier recordings seem like mere blueprints.

Stubbornly refusing to engage with almost every fundamental musical tool available (the chord, melody, choruses, even the musical change), The Cool Greenhouse have somehow managed to compile an album of eleven songs that often comes astonishingly close to pop. Their attachment to long songs with single hooks that steamroll through their entireties has not abated, but neither has their inexplicable knack for keeping these strange creatures alarmingly engaging and accessible when by all logic they should be irritatingly avant-garde. It shouldn’t work on so many levels, but it absolutely does.

 

A large part of what makes this a winning formula is frontman Tom Greenhouse’s way with words. Frequently topical and clearly political in some sense, Greenhouse’s lyrics side-step the on-the-nose delivery of traditional yawn-inducing political rock in favour of a strange idiosyncratic blend of pop culture snippets, patchwork narratives and oblique literary references. Bursting with humour and irony, the album deftly meanders from Rotary Club jumble sales to Margaret Thatcher’s living room to futuristic voyages into musical VR, taking aim at the gammon classes, rural conservatism and a host of other late-capitalist absurdities with razor-sharp wit along the way.

Discovering that The Cool Greenhouse’s first 7” magically mentioned his own name, producer, sound engineer and mixer Phil Booth (Sleaford Mods, The Wave Pictures) invited the group to record the album in his JT Soar studio in Nottingham. The old potato-packing warehouse offered the ideal working environment for the band, who recorded the album over seven days as live between kipping on its couches, 4am whiskey-soaked sessions and Mario Kart ’64 on demand. “The sessions were stuffed with weird little synchronistic miracles” Tom tells. “Discussing a song then seeing its title on a shop window, finding things in pubs straight out of our songs…these zapped me onto some sort of Jungian plane where I didn’t need to sleep and knew exactly what to do.”

Having sufficiently impressed Melodic Records enough for them to sign them on the basis of their first ever show, the band have continued to delight and disorientate live audiences in equal measure, supporting the likes of The Stroppies and Do Nothing. Also championed by DIY and 6 music, their upward trajectory shows no sign of halting.

“The Sticks” is the first single from The Cool Greenhouse’s self-titled debut album, which is pre-orderable now on limited edition transparent green vinyl (300 copies only!) from Melodic records:

The Cool Greenhouse’s self titled debut is out on Friday & we couldn’t be happier with how #DinkedEdition no. 49 turned out. Also on Ultra clear vinyl, signed + numbered postcard, colour obi strip + D/L ft 2 bonus tracks. It’s picking up some fantastic reviews only 300 copies & they won’t last long!.

Releases May 29th, 2020

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Taken from their upcoming album Incidental Music, W. H. Lung‘s new release “Second Death Of My Face” establishes them as new players in modern rock.

W. H. Lung‘s first cut “Simpatico People” was a delightful homage to the originators of Krautrock. Their new track sees them pushing beyond the confines of that genre and into synthier, shinier territory.

While still retaining their now-hallmark sense of rhythmic propulsion, “Second Death of My Face” offers a spit-polished, chrome-plated melodic element to their sound – similar to the leap NEU! made between their second record and NEU! 75. The exciting thing about this pair of W. H. Lung tracks is that they’re from the same record.

“I put down some nonsense for melody over an early draft,” says Joseph E. of the band, “and when I listened back it sounded like ‘my face, my face.’ The images that followed seemed filmic and the idea went from there. The chorus came to me as I fiddled on the piano in Central Library. It was big and unashamed and I was thinking of Bowie.

“My phone had died so I couldn’t record it as a voice note. I remember the panic of not wanting to lose the melody and of needing to try the idea out (out loud). I rushed home with my eyes half closed, singing it over and over in my head. It’s about watching your own life lived.”

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This is the second single from the record for you. The bulk of Second Death Of My Face was developed on the piano of Manchester’s Central Library, and it is a five and half minute epic, with cathartic lyrics and soaring crescendos – probably their most anthemic release so far…“Second Death Of My Face” is out now and debut album Incidental Music drops 5th April on Melodic Records.

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W. H. Lung is a recording project founded in Manchester in mid-2016. Its first single to yield is the dream-like and shifting ‘Inspiration!’, recorded at The Nave in Leeds and produced by Matt Peel (Eagulls). A song that speaks to the ideas of eternity, belonging and meaninglessness, it takes the shape of a kraut/psych peregrination; persevering but never dull, and bringing it home before the break. The motorik nature of the track stems from W. H. Lung’s writing ethic which, with an Alesis drum machine at its core, aims to create a surrounding maelstrom of ethereal circuits and hypnotic rhythms. W. H. Lung continue to write and record. The debut album ‘Incidental Music’ drops 5th April 2019 on Melodic Records.

The first single taken from W. H. Lung’s debut album ‘Incidental Music’ out 5/4/19.

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Have you Listened to the propulsive indie-rock of Cool Ghouls, and their wonderfully wholesome Animal Races LP (Melodic Records). It’s actually been eighteen months since its summer 2016 release, and, as such, the band have a new track “CCR Bootleg” is both a perfectly-timed return, and an energetic reminder of their craft.

Taken from a new Post Trash’s new compilation – Volume 3 – this gleaming new cut will sit alongside tracks from the likes of Pardoner, Christina Schneider, Bad History Month, and many others, while all benefits will be donated to Puerto Rico hurricane relief. Rowdy and rambunctious, CCR Bootleg is a skittering four-minutes, showcasing the punkier side of the band, that boisterous lead-vocal backing up a suitably solid-but-slack backline that adds a distinct and palpable air of city living, from the he daily clamour, to the surrounding hedonism of such a thing.

Listen to the track below right now; it precedes a full European tour which starts in mid-February

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W.H LUNG – ” Want “

Posted: November 23, 2017 in MUSIC
Tags: , ,

W. H. Lung (635)

Manchester recent newcomers W.H. Lung continue to impress with new cut ‘Want’.

The band’s sound is immediately infectious yet difficult to place; off kilter guitar pop with swathes of electronics, their never-ending percussive chug recalls Neu! at their most expansive.

New song ‘Want‘ is a mini-epic, a masterpiece in control and release, with those impeccable Krautrock influences set against an innate pop sensibility.

Perfectly sized to occupy the side of a seven inch single, ‘Want‘ acts as a sort of mini-manifesto, with W.H. Lung barking out Kerouac’s advice: “First thought, best thought!”

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Empty Cellar Records is stoked to announce the third full-length release by San Francisco’s Cool Ghouls, Animal Races. Fans of their self-titled debut and 2014’s A Swirling Fire Burning Through the Rye will be similarly stoked to hear how this band has continued to evolve. If the first album was a celebratory debut, and the second an earnest venture into deeper waters, this third album is like the crystal born of the murky womb that was the second record, fertilized by the initial intention of the first. Not only have the Cool Ghouls reaped the crop they sowed; they’ve baked it into some new kind of bread.

For the uninitiated – Cool Ghouls play rock’n’roll. That’s about all there is to it. They’re California natives. They try to do a good job. They like to try to elevate and get far out. They also like to keep it real. They like to make friends and have a good time. They don’t like bullshit. They want to keep growing and learning how to become more powerful musicians. This record reflects the discoveries they’ve made over the last five years about live performance, themselves, and each other.

The eleven tracks, recorded to tape by Kelley Stoltz in his backyard studio and mixed by Mikey Young (Total Control etc.), are first and foremost documents of the four-piece’s live performance of the tunes. Many of the songs were road-tested, but – unlike the prior records – a few of them were not. This opened the door for some new looks: an acoustic guitar, some synth, upright piano, a little pedal steel wizardry from Tom Heyman, etc. It’s Cool Ghouls doing what they’ve always done, but in more ways and better.

Animal Races will be available on LP/CD (8/19) in the US via Empty Cellar Records and the EU/UK via Melodic Records; and also, on cassette via Burger Records. All versions feature full-color artwork painted by Shannon Shaw (Shannon and The Clams).

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