Posts Tagged ‘Heavenly Recordings’

Sinéad O’Connor marks her long-awaited return with a stunning interpretation of ‘Trouble Of The World’, a traditional song made famous by exalted gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. It follows the-ever-more pertinent ‘Trouble Soon Be Over’ – her contribution to 2015’s ‘Tribute To Blind Willie Johnson’ compilation and once more exudes the heart and soul of this extraordinary performer. Sympathetic to its origins, the heartfelt, evocative tones propel this impassioned rendition to the present its poignancy highlighted by a remarkable artist who leaves her own indelible mark on this topical realisation whilst realigning with a positive viewpoint. In her own words, she explains; “for me the song isn’t about death or dying.

More akin, a message of certainty that the human race is on a journey toward making this world paradise and that we will get there.” The inspirational lyrical narrative that underpins ‘Trouble Of The World’ unfortunately bears more relevance than ever today in the context of the death of George Floyd and the highlighting of the persistent racist undercurrents that trouble mixed societies across the globe. Sinéad has also allocated all her profits as a donation to Black Live Matter charities which not only aid various causes but highlight the inconsistencies in society.

The song sees Sinead joining forces with renowned producer David Holmes, and recorded in Belfast, Northern Ireland at the easing of the lockdown it shares an uncanny albeit eerie symmetry with our new trouble of the world backdrop and once again Sinéad awakes our souls to the ironies and similarities of our collective past and present. The pair have created a sonic tonic and shout out to the powers that be as a voice of the people still questioning all-too-frequent events such as witnessed over the past few months that ensue decades since the nascent birth of the civil rights movement in the United States. Embodying a voice with beauty and innocence, a spirit part punk, part mystic with a combined fearlessness and gentle authenticity – unique, uncompromising, a pioneer, a visionary, just some of the descriptions that perhaps merely touch the surface of Sinéad O’Connor.

All of Sinead O’Connor’s profits from the single ‘Trouble of The World’ are going to Black Lives Matter.

 

Working Men’s Club self-titled debut album was due to drop today, but for reasons obvious, it is now due in October. Looking at the blank space left by the postponement, 18 year old wonder-kid frontman Syd Minsky-Sargeant decided to utilise his free time, in lockdown, and capitalise on the creative momentum the band has garnered. The result is a 21-minute continuous ‘Megamix’ that simultaneously acts as a taster and a condensed electronic reworking of parts of the album. Due to the current global situation we unfortunately have to announce that we will be pushing the release of our album back to October 2nd. This wasn’t an easy decision but we want to be playing shows again the day the album is out (and fingers crossed now we will).

Syd would like to note that: “It doesn’t feel like a particularly apt time to be self promoting anything at all however we wanted to give something to the people who pre-ordered the album on what would of the original release date.“ The Megamix will be available to stream only via www.megamix.workingmensclub.net from 10am today, Friday 5th June 2020 and will be streaming on a continuous loop until midnight on 12th June.

“Initially it seemed a bit of a crazy idea to go and remix an album we’ve just made that isn’t even out yet. But once we got into it we were like, ‘let’s fucking go for it’. One could, of course, argue that crazy ideas are what’s needed in such crazy times but, in reality, what has been produced is less of a chaotic and scatterbrain idea and more a coherent artistic statement in line with the band’s perpetual forward momentum.”

Minsky-Sargeant teamed up with the band’s producer Ross Orton – under the moniker ‘Minsky Rock’, a recently started project under which they recently completed a Jarvis Cocker remix – and the pair worked remotely to create the unique reimagining. “Ross has a studio in Sheffield and I have a bit of one at home. So I would play a synth part and then send him the file over and he’d put it into his computer and then bring it up on a shared screen. I could see his interface and we’d mix it like that. It was like being in the same room.” The result is a “reinterpretation rather than a remix” says Minsky-Sargeant. Over its seamlessly flowing duration, as it unfurls in hypnotic and infectious grooves – teasing snippets of songs as they weave in and out – the mix plays out like a classic 12” extended mix. Albeit one that takes on different forms and explores new terrain altogether.

“It takes a number of parts of the album but different versions [and edits] of the songs,” he says. “I’ve played new parts on more or less everything. Some tracks I’ve taken out the guitar parts and re-done them with synths or replaced bass lines with synths.” There’s something of a northern lineage that can be traced here too, in that the 12” band remixes were something of a mainstay of Manchester bands like New Order and A Certain Ratio, and in a similar spirit, WMC are a new young band pushing, and crossing, the boundaries of where guitar and electronic music can interlink and overlap. “It’s free flowing and electronic, rather than sounding like a band,” Minsky-Sargeant says of the mix. “It gives an insight into what the record is like, as well as the future of the band, but it’s also something totally exclusive. It’s very much its own thing.”

Following the success of last year’s ‘Somebody’s Knocking’ LP, Mark Lanegan has announced the news of his new solo album, ‘Straight Songs Of Sorrow’, released 8th May via Heavenly Recordings.

When considering any great work of art, be it a painting, a novel, or a piece of music, it’s natural to wonder what might have inspired it: ‘the story behind the song’.

Mark Lanegan’s new album, “Straight Songs Of Sorrow”, flips that equation. Here are 15 songs inspired by a story: his life story, as documented by his own hand in his new memoir, Sing Backwards And Weep. The book is a brutal, nerve-shredding read, thanks to Lanegan’s unsparing candour in recounting a journey from troubled youth in eastern Washington, through his drug-stained existence amid the ’90s Seattle rock scene, to an unlikely salvation at the dawn of the 21st century.

There’s death and tragedy, yet also humour and hope, thanks to the tenacity which impels its host, even at his lowest moments. As Lanegan writes near the end: “I was the ghost that wouldn’t die.” Today, Lanegan is a renowned songwriter and a much-coveted collaborator, as adept at electronica as with rock, constantly honing his indomitable voice: an asphalt-laced linctus for the soul. While the memoir documents a struggle to find peace with himself, his new album emphasis the extent to which he came to realise that music is his life. “Writing the book, I didn’t get catharsis,” he chuckles. “All I got was a Pandora’s box full of pain and misery. I went way in, and remembered shit I’d put away 20 years ago.

But I started writing these songs the minute I was done, and I realised there was a depth of emotion because they were all linked to memories from this book. It was a relief to suddenly go back to music. Then I realised that was the gift of the book: these songs. I’m really proud of this record.” Straight Songs Of Sorrow combines musical trace elements from early Mark Lanegan albums with the synthesized constructs of later work. The meditative acoustic guitar fingerpicking – provided by Lamb Of God’s Mark Morton – on Apples From A Tree and Hanging On (For DRC) echo 1994’s Whiskey For The Holy Ghost. Yet one of that record’s touchstones was Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks, echoed in the new album’s opener I Wouldn’t Want To Say, where Lanegan extemporises *à la Ballerina over musique concrète wave patterns generated by his latest favourite compositional tool, a miniature computer-synth called the Organelle. The lyric clings onto the music, emulating his book’s queasy momentum: *“Swinging from death… to revival.” “That song is the explanation, the beginning and middle and end of that entire period of time,” Mark says. “The encapsulation of the entire experience, book and record. So I started with that.” Lanegan affirms that every song references a specific episode or person in the book, albeit some more explicitly than others. Hanging On (For DRC) is a loving ode to his friend Dylan Carlson, genius progenitor of drone metal and a fellow unlikely survivor of Seattle’s narcotic dramas.

“I was always unhappy, and he was the guy who was always smiling, even through my crazy schemes that eventually got both of us into a lot of trouble.” The richly cinematic mood of Daylight In The Nocturnal House, meanwhile, paints a more impressionistic scene: factory smoke, rain, a phone call from *“somebody’s grand-daughter”, who’ll “pay to make somebody crawl/And send you to heaven.” The singer’s perspective is ambiguous. “I got into a lot of shady business in those years,” Lanegan says. Longtime observers will recognise some familiar recurrent themes. Death. Destruction. Bad behaviour. In the case of At Zero Below, all in the same song. “Yes, I did burn someone with a cigarette,” Mark says. “Yes, I did spit in somebody’s face – maybe more than once in my life. Stuff I’m not proud of.

That song is also about one of my many ex-girlfriends who is no longer with us. It’s all linked to the book.” At Zero Below features two of the album’s many stellar guests. Singing admonitory harmonies with himself is Greg Dulli, another ’90s alt-rock veteran, Lanegan’s erstwhile partner in mischief and fellow Gutter Twin. The song’s incantatory fiddle is played by The Bad Seeds’ Warren Ellis. No lesser figure than Led Zeppelin’s John Paul Jones provides Mellotron on the serpentine Ballad Of A Dying Rover (*“I’m just a sick sick man/My days are numbered”). Aside from mandolin, all Daylight In The Nocturnal House’s cobwebbed atmospherics are by Portishead’s Adrian Utley. Ed Harcourt is Lanegan’s pick for album MVP (“He’s all over it – everything that he plays, piano or Wurlitzer, becomes magical”), with special mention to bassist Jack Bates, son of Peter Hook; that duo make especially distinctive contributions to Churchbells, Ghosts a bleakly humorous lament to the drudgery of life on the road (*“I’d ask somebody for a quarter/If there were someone for me to phone”). Ketamine is a numb blues, with Lanegan shadowed by Cold Cave vocalist Wesley Eisold, who inspired the album’s only overt drug song (ironically, about a drug that Lanegan has never actually taken). “Wes is good friends with Genesis P-Orridge,” explains Mark, “and he said the last time he saw Gen she was in a hospital bed, saying to this priest, ‘No thank you sir, I don’t need any last rites, but if you have any ketamine that would be perfect.’” He laughs. “So I immediately wrote that song and had him sing on it. There’s drugs throughout the record – they’re rife in Bleed All Over – but that song was the only real specific one.” The material on the last two Mark Lanegan Band albums had Lanegan’s words set to music by various other sources. But aside from the Mark Morton collaborations,

Straight Songs Of Sorrow was built from the ground up by Lanegan alone, aided by producer Alain Johannes, his longtime consigliere. Only two other songs have shared credits, and even these stay in-house: Burying Ground and Eden Lost And Found were co-written by Mark’s wife Shelley Brien, with whom he also duets on the Rita Coolidge/Kris Kristofferson-style ballad This Game Of Love. “Let’s put it this way,” says Mark. “Every girlfriend I’ve ever had, for any amount of time, left me.

All the good ones left me! Until my current wife. It was great to sing that with Shelley, it really shows she’s a great singer. And it has a depth of emotion that I’m not used to. This is a more honest record than I’ve probably ever made.” A crushing twin-song centrepiece proves that. First, Stockholm City Blues, a sparse, beautiful, strings and finger-picking meditation on the remorse code of addiction (*“I pay for this pain I put into my blood”). Then, the seven-minute epic Skeleton Key, a supplicatory confessional (“I’m ugly inside and out there is no denying”) that also provides the album title. It’s a remarkable performance from a man whose punishment for plumbing the depths was simply to continue further along the road. “My wife called that my ‘redemption song’,” says Lanegan. And indeed, there is a happy ending to this story. Just as his book closes with the hero overcoming adversity and turning, battered but cleansed, towards a new day, so Straight Songs Of Sorrow closes with Eden Lost And Found. *“Sunrise coming up baby/To burn the dirt right off of me,” marvels Lanegan, with his words echoed by Simon Bonney of Crime & The City Solution, an all-time hero. “I wanted to make a positive song to end this record, because that’s the way the book ended,” Mark says. “And what’s more positive than to have your favourite singer sing with you?” Straight Songs Of Sorrow feels both definitive and unique, a culmination of its creator’s arc yet also indicative of the energy that drives him onto future horizons. No wonder Lanegan is proud. “I do feel this is something special for me, something honest,” he says. “’Cos records are not real life, man – in case no one told ya. They’re just a fake version of life!” Mark Lanegan laughs. “Well, at least you have one now that’s a little closer to being real. Unfortunately, it’s by me.”

The album, which is closely aligned to his forthcoming memoir, “Sing Backwards And Weep”, features guest appearances from Greg Dulli, Warren Ellis, John Paul Jones, Ed Harcourt and more

Image may contain: text

Dark and dizzying, hard-edged and sophisticated, “Why Not” is the fast-paced and magnetic brand-new single from Unloved. The track is out right now through the courtesy of the legendary Heavenly Recordings.You can find sundry streaming and download links for it , and it also appears in the Season 3 premiere of Killing Eve out now as well.

We’re delighted that Killing Eve are airing the first episode of Season 3 on Sunday in the US and Monday in the UK – a real treat to entertain us during the lockdown! This is especially exciting as we’re also going to release our brand new single ‘Why Not’ which features in the episode . You can pre-save it already and familiarise yourself with the tracks from season 1 and 2 to get yourself ready for the new season by clicking the link. We can’t wait for you to hear it.

if the shangri las got locked in a studio with Lee Hazzlewood, Nancy Sinatra and Raymond Scott and Ennio Morricone it could possibly sound like unloved
Band Members
David Holmes, Keefus Ciancia & Jade Vincent

No photo description available.

It’s a pleasure to announce our debut album ‘Working Men’s Club’ will be released on the 5th of June via Heavenly Recordings. It’s been a long road with a lot of sweat put into this album and at points we weren’t sure it would actually get made. However, it did and we’re incredibly proud of it. Produced by our dear friend Ross Orton and Recorded in Sheffield.

A rumble on the horizon. Gritted teeth, nuclear fizz and fissured rock. A dab of pill dust from a linty pocket before it hits: the atom split, pool table overturned, pint glass smashed — valley fever breaking with the clouds as the inertia of small town life is well and truly disrupted. Here to bust out of Doledrum, clad in a t-shirt that screams Socialism and armed with drum machine, synth, pedal and icy stare are Working Men’s Club, and their self-titled debut album.

Their eponymous collection of songs is equal parts Calder Valley restlessness and raw Sheffield steel; guitars locking horns with floor-filling beats, synths masquerading as drums and Minsky-Sargeant’s scratchy, electrifying bedroom demos brought to their full potential by Orton’s blade-sharp yet sensitive production.

Standouts include the nonchalant existential groove John Cooper Clarke — centred around the realisation that yes, even the luckiest guy alive, the Bard of Salford himself, will someday die. The washily-vocalled, Orange Juicily-guitared White Rooms and People, Cook A Coffee which is like a lost Joy Division number from an alternate universe and the frenetic, pew-pewing A.A.A.A.

Working Men’s Club are: Sydney Minsky-Sargeant – Vocals/Guitar/Drum Machine/Synth Liam Ogburn – Bass Rob Graham – Guitar/Synth Mairead O’Connor – Guitar/Keyboards/Vocals

No photo description available.

The Orielles new record “Disco Volador” has landed! Out this Friday, and it’s been flying out on pre-order. Initial pressing is coloured and is very nice, ‪Out on Heavenly Recordings. Hailing from Halifax, The Orielles are sisters Sidonie B and Esmé Dee Hand Halford and their best friend Henry Carlyle Wade whom they met at a house party just a few years ago. The then teenagers bonded over their shared love of alternative US bands from the 90s such as Sonic Youth & Pixies as well as pioneering filmmakers including Quentin Tarantino (The Orielles have cited his work in their songs and consider his work a major lyrical and aesthetical influence). Following the release of ‘Silver Dollar Moment’ the band recruited a new member Alex Stephen’s and released the smash hit single ‘Bobbi’s Second World.’

Released on: January 5th 2020 The Orielles announced their sophomore album Disco Volador back in October with the release of lead single “Come Down On Jupiter.” Now that we’ve entered the album’s year of release, the English psych-pop band is back today with a second advance single — the album’s theme song, in fact. The appealingly lively “Space Samba (Disco Volador Theme)” is five minutes of sleek, danceable music drawing from disco, tropicalia, loungey psychedelia, and of course, samba. Get swept up in it below.

Open uri20200219 26832 qvyfdm?1582112951

Mark Lanegan, the former Screaming Trees frontman and monumental voice has a new
solo album ready called “Straight Songs Of Sorrow”. Here’s the excellent lead single ‘Skeleton Key’. An extended, haunting ballad with an instant hypnotic effect. It’s a self-blaming, melancholic and heavy-hearted reflection. “Ugly, I’m so very ugly inside and out, there’ no denying, why should you love me”. Even after all these years when I hear Lanegan’s vocal I get goosebumps. Strangely enough, the darkness he always creates feels comfortable and inspiring. Another stunning achievement by the genuine troubadour.

When considering any great work of art, be it a painting, a novel, or a piece of music, it’s natural to wonder what might have inspired it: ‘the story behind the song’. Mark Lanegan’s new album flips that equation. Here are 15 songs inspired by a story :Lanegan will be issuing his book of memoir’s called ‘Sing Backwards And Weep’ out this spring.

Following the success of last year’s ‘Somebody’s Knocking’ LP, Mark Lanegan has announced the news of his new solo album, ‘Straight Songs Of Sorrow’, released 8th May via Heavenly Recordings. The album, which is closely aligned to his forthcoming memoir, “Sing Backwards And Weep”, features guest appearances from Greg Dulli, Warren Ellis, John Paul Jones, Ed Harcourt and others.

Straight Songs Of Sorrow combines musical trace elements from early Mark Lanegan albums with the synthesized constructs of later work. The meditative acoustic guitar fingerpicking – provided by Lamb Of God’s Mark Morton – on Apples From A Tree and Hanging On (For DRC) echo 1994’s Whiskey For The Holy Ghost. Yet one of that record’s touchstones was Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks, echoed in the new album’s openerI Wouldn’t Want To Say, where Lanegan extemporises *à la Ballerina over musique concrète wave patterns generated by his latest favourite compositional tool, a miniature computer-synth called the Organelle.

The enchanting spell that Hatchie (aka 26-year-old Australian singer/songwriter Harriette Pilbeam) spins on her stellar dream-pop debut, “Keepsake”, is heady and hard to resist. “Obsessed,” easily the most delicious of ear wormy-y melodies here, gets its host toe tapping along instantly. She sings in earnest of an experience of love so innocent and unselfish: “You are the one who told me to run/Give it a try/Just have a life”—that whatever misgiving the album might harbor is happily forgotten in the whir of jangly guitars and the fuzz-drenched wash of her breathy vocals.

Pilbeam cut her teeth in the Brisbane indie scene, playing bass on other people’s songs. After eight years, she stepped out on her own under the Hatchie moniker with her 2018 EP, “Sugar & Spice”. If she was still unsure of her prowess, a remix of “Sure,” the EP’s standout, by Cocteau Twins’ guitarist Robin Guthrie should have dissipated any doubts.

She has a knack of borrowing from the genre’s best progenitors and current practitioners, but also folds in mainstream pop and emo—musical styles that should be at loggerheads—yet in her capable hands, succeed and soar. Her airy vocals can slide satisfyingly from chesty to high, head tones in one breath; and has a timbre remarkably similar to that of Dolores O’Riordan of The Cranberries. Often, as in “Without a Blush” and “Keep,“ songs are anchored in evocative lyrics, rooted in that desire to give voice to emotions once suppressed or fleeting moments that need to be savored over and over again.

“Fate keeps trying to find me/I’m not the kind of/Girl to let it define me,” she coos on the shimmering “Not That Kind.” It’s beyond just a pithy observation of a girl caught up in the machinations of romantic love; it functions as battle cry for how she regards her career in music.

Australia’s Hatchie has shared the new video for ‘Stay With Me,’ a brand new track from her debut record ‘Keepsake’ to be released on June 21st via Heavenly Recordings.

‘Stay With Me’ is taken from Hatchie’s debut album ‘Keepsake’ out June 21st on Double Double Whammy, Heavenly Recordings and Ivy League,

Stay With Me” may be her most straightforward dance floor pop moment yet.”
– The Fadar – 

Stay with Me” has the pulse of a Madonna hit from the late ’80s and early ’90s, and fits right in with similarly themed “crying-in-the-club tracks” like the entirety of Lorde’s Melodrama and, of course, Robyn’s “Dancing on My Own”.
– Consequence of Sound –

“It’s a Crying-In-The-Club style sad banger, a real bop that fuses her drifting, hallucinogenic guitar effects with something upbeat.”
– Clash Music – 

“The yearning chorus of ‘Stay With Me,’ punctuated with ethereal stabs of ‘90s synth, is delicious in its desperation and incredibly catchy.”
– Paste Magazine – 

No photo description available.

Hailing from the West Country, Katy J Pearson’s music seems to exists in a perfect musical sweet-spot; After previously forming something of a family band with her brother, and recently signed to Heavenly Recordings, Katy has this week shared her first solo offering, “Tonight”.

Tonight is in some ways a classic pop-song, eyes meet over a crowded dancefloor, a romantic spark flashes and vulnerability soars, “sometimes we get away with it, sometimes we get burned, sometimes we can just learn from it, or we just get burnt”. Musically, the story sits atop a shuffling lead guitar, sprightly drum-beat and towards the songs closing some delicious trumpets, like Camera Obscura with a touch of California sunshine.

A hugely impressive jumping off point, this is music to get lost in, and already we can’t wait to hear a lot more from Katy J Pearson.

“Tonight” is out now via Heavenly Recordings.

Working Men’s Club have revealed a brand new single and accompanying video (directed by Jak Payne), along with their second physical release following the vinyl chart-topping single ‘Bad Blood’, now on it’s third pressing ‘Teeth’ sees the band exploring darker, more electronic territory, with driving drum machine and synths dominating the airspace

“It is a metaphor” teases the band’s singer, guitarist and beat-maker, Sydney Minsky-Sargeant. “It could be about going insane or what you see, what you think you feel inside, a lot of things… put through a drum machine… basically we just want to confuse the fuck out of people, in a good way!”
“The quartet’s debut single Bad Blood appears to have been no fluke: “Teeth” is darkly menacing disco, with bracing guitar squall on top.”

“Lyrically preoccupied by the passing of time and subconscious despair, the track sounds like insanity pouring out of an old television set”
Paste Magazine

Released on Heavenly Recordings. Pre-order the 7″ single and 12″ EP featuring remixes from Gabe Gurnsey, out on August 23rd.