Posts Tagged ‘Leeds’

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The band formerly known as ’Ørmstons’ has undergone a massive reinvention including changing their name, and their newest single is an absolute tour de force.

Now going by the new name RAE, ‘Never Meant To Start A Witch Hunt’ is heavier than a Rugby prop and bites like a rabid Yorkshire Terrier. They’re a typical indie band who aren’t bothered about becoming world famous, it’s the music they care about the most. RAE was announced to the world in January 2020. A time for a clean slate and a new journey.

Jess, Will, Bob and Jamie are no strangers to being in a band together, previously know as ‘Ørmstons’, they have grown together as friends and musicians and are ready to take the next leap into the big black pit, or as its normally called – the music industry. Their music takes a spin on indie/pop and indie/rock – the best of both worlds. Lyrically, they touch upon all the issues we face as we grow up, love and heartbreak (which we will go through over ad over again in our lives), politics, mental health. The band aspire to be as raw and real as they can be in both person and in their music.

The way I see it they’re like a cross between Blondie and the Manic Street Preachers. Frontwoman Jessica Huxham is the star of the show, and can captivate audiences at the drop of a hat. Her lyrics are haunting and quiet, similar to Morrissey’s back in his prime.

This track is the flag in the ground that marks RAE’s reinvention. It’s not quite Bohemian Rhapsody or Jailhouse Rock, but it is simple and easy to listen to, and well worth a few repeats.

Band Members
Jess Huxham, Will Smith, Bob O’Hare, Jamie Collins

RAE “Never Meant To Start A Witch Hunt”  Released on: 2020-06-12

MUSH – ” Live On KEXP “

Posted: March 23, 2020 in MUSIC
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Mush are from Leeds. They play a kind of slacked out art-rock. The songs are melodic and highly music -orientated but weirdly catchy and infectious. Their early single Alternative Facts was a ten minute critique of the increasingly familiar phenomenon of fake news and the movement toward soundbite-orietntated politics. Set to a backdrop of a driving repetitive rhythms, weaving guitar textures and off the cuff a-tonal vocal style,Alternative Factsis a catchy and refreshing single choice. due to the sheer length. Live performances have prompted the expected ‘guitar band’comparisons to the likes of Pavement, Television, Velvet underground etc. Mush, however, play with an unhinged and experimental energy and purist intentionality that means they are ones to watch in their own right.

Mush performing live at the La Chapelle by le Studio in Rennes, France, during Trans Musicales 2019. Recorded December 8, 2019.

Songs: Eat The Etiquette Revising My Fee Gig Economy 3D Routine Alternative Facts

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3D Routine’ has arrived. Following on from their ‘Induction Party E.P’, Mush are circulating their own sonic mythology, blurring the lines between abstract surrealism, existentialism and social commentary. Like its predecessor ‘3D Routine’ is a sensory overload of clattering, hooky, guitar work. However, this time space emerges between the onslaughts and in this respite, room is found for new emotional depth. More expansive than ever before, ‘3D Routine’ manages to maintain the rawness of a classic debut but it’s experimentation and variety portray a band unlikely to rest on their ‘guitar band’ chops.

Songwriter Dan Hyndman explains the genesis of the band as being “fairly boiler plate” a combination of friends old and new converging in Leeds post-uni to form a band predominantly united in their mutual affection for the Pavement back catalogue. Finally settling on a lineup of Nick Grant (bass), Tyson (guitar) and Phil Porter (drums) the band’s progression has taken them far beyond this original vision.

UK band Mush are gearing up to release their new LP 3D Routine next week, and this latest single “Existential Dread” is a fun example of the band’s angular, guitar-driven style, which blends nervous post-punk with garage rock distortion.

Having garnered local attention in the early days for their unhinged and often calamitous live shows in Leeds, it was the unlikely radio hit ‘Alternative Facts’, (clocking in at an uncompromising ten minutes) that brought the Mush to the attention of a wider audience. The song, one of the last releases for the legendary Too Pure Singles Club saw early support from Marc Riley and others on BBC 6music with them playing multiple sessions, and the follow up single, ‘Gig Economy’ hopping onto the 6music playlist. Roaming further afield from their hometown, Mush spent the first half of 2019 heading out around the UK, earning a reputation for their intense live performances, supporting the likes of Girl Band, The Lovely Eggs, Yak, Shame and Stereolab, as well as releasing the ‘Induction Party’ EP to great acclaim. At the tail end of summer of 2019 Mush headed to Leeds’ Green Mount Studio and with Andy Savours (Dream Wife, Our Girl, My Bloody Valentine) manning the mixing desk, their debut LP, ‘3D Routine’ was born.

The way in which the album brazenly moves from polished 3- minute punk tracks, to avant-garde spoken word, to sardonic-political funk, whilst sounding like the same band is testament to an uncompromisingly unrefined ethic and compounds the jarring nature of Mush. Together, the songs form a unified, abrasive, emotive, frenetic and entirely beguiling concoction of sound and opinion, a fast-moving snapshot of current times, relatable, politically minded and incredibly personal. Music for those who want their guitars loud and weird, and their political commentary a little less ‘on the nose’.

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Andy Gill, a founding member and guitarist for the British post-punk band Gang of Four, has died. He was 64.

Formed in Leeds in 1976, Gang Of Four’s career spanned five decades, from their first single Damaged Goods to last year’s studio album Happy Now. In 1979, they made their Top 60 chart debut with At Home He’s A Tourist – despite the song being banned by the BBC for a lyrical reference to condoms.

Their debut album Entertainment!, released in September of the same year, has frequently been cited as an influence or inspiration by aspiring musicians, Combining Marxist politics with punk, dub, funk and disco, the “stiff, jerky aggression of songs such as Damaged Goods and I Found That Essence Rare invented a new style,

Gang Of Four never had a hit single (1982’s I Love A Man In Uniform came close, before it was banned from the airwaves during the Falklands War) but their first three albums are considered indispensable. They split in 1984, but reformed several times over the years, with a variety of line-ups. They released 10 albums in all, with a couple of periods of hiatus during their 40-year history Gill was the only constant throughout their career.

Gill’s death was announced Saturday (February. 1st) on Twitter by his current bandmates Thomas McNeice, John Sterry and Tobias Humble. A cause of death was not given. Gill had developed a “respiratory illness,” after finishing an Asian tour with Gang Of Four last year, they said. “This pain is the price of extraordinary joy, almost three decades with the best man in the world,” wrote his wife, Catherine Mayer, on Twitter.

Gill was a founding member of Gang of Four since the band’s inception in the late 1970s, and served as guitarist and producer of the group’s nine albums, including Happy Now in 2019. The musician’s scratchy, staccato riffs provided the band with their signature sound, and influenced the likes of Nirvana, Fugazi and Franz Ferdinand.

“This is so hard for us to write, but our great friend and Supreme Leader has died today,” Gang of Four wrote in the statement. “Andy’s final tour in November was the only way he was ever really going to bow out; with a Stratocaster around his neck, screaming with feedback and deafening the front row.”

The group called Gill “one of the best to ever do it,” adding that his “influence on guitar music and the creative process was inspiring for us, as well as everyone who worked alongside him and listened to his music.” His bandmates ended their post asking fans to “go give ’em a spin for him.” He had just finished a new studio album with Gang Of Four, they added.

As a producer, Gill worked on many high-profile music projects, including Red Hot Chili Peppers‘ 1984 self-titled debut album. He also worked on music by the Stranglers, Michael Hutchence, Killing Joke, Therapy?, the Jesus Lizard and the Futureheads.

In 2018, Gill spoke about his never-ending interest in creating music. “These days I get up early at 6:30, I get a cup of tea and I go straight down the studio and start working … I get a buzz out of it. I’m not in any hurry to stop,” he said.

Gill is survived by his wife, Catherine Mayer; his brother Martin; and “many family and elective family members who will miss him terribly” . His uncompromising artistic vision and commitment to the cause meant that he was still listening to mixes for the upcoming record, whilst planning the next tour from his hospital bed.

But to us, he was our friend – and we’ll remember him for his kindness and generosity, his fearsome intelligence, bad jokes, mad stories and endless cups of Darjeeling tea. He just so happened to be a bit of a genius too.

One of the best to ever do it, his influence on guitar music and the creative process was inspiring for us, as well as everyone who worked alongside him and listened to his music. And his albums and production work speak for themselves. Go give ‘em a spin for him…Love you mate.

John, Thomas and Tobias
GANG OF FOUR

CARO – ” Fall Apart “

Posted: January 17, 2020 in MUSIC
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The Leeds trio have been skirting around Northern festivals this year and we were very intrigued to hear the expert juxtaposition of the band’s sound. At points delicate and dainty and at others willing to put a razor to your throat – it’s what we like. Hello friends, we’re very excited to share our new single ‘Fall Apart’ with you

The beginning of ‘Cold Comfort’ sounds like a gentile pop track, somewhere between Wild Beasts early efforts and Bombay Bicycle Club at their most festival friendly. How brilliant it is then to hear the fizzing and thrusting chorus scream out of the traps.

‘Cold Comfort’ hints at a wide breadth of talent from the Yorkshire band as well as the ability to switch up a gear and make us all wish we had been listening a little harder already.

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Definitely a name to listen out for in the future. They’re really great live, catch them if you can.” Huw Stephens, BBC Radio 1 “a Leeds-based trio sporting stately, delicately-arranged pop that’ll slap you round the face with a fish” – DIY Magazine

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We’re so excited to welcome back Aussie modern rock heroes DMA’S & Electrifying Manchester indie-pop quartet PALE WAVES! This year also sees the return of Leicester’s Easy Life fresh from a huge UK tour, as well as folk-punk provocateur Ezra Furman. Plus we’ve got psych heroes Temples, Bristol’s favourite sibling fronted band Bad Sounds, former Charlatans frontman Tim Burgess & pop songstress SELF ESTEEM all just added for next year!

We’ve announced over 50 artists today and there’s still loads more to come from the Best Festival For Emerging Talent – Over 200 artists, 20+ venues, all across Leeds on Saturday 2nd May!

 

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Following on from their ‘Induction Party e.p’, Mush are circulating their own sonic mythology, blurring the lines between abstract surrealism, existentialism and social commentary. like its predecessor ‘3d routine’ is a sensory overload of clattering, hooky, guitar work. however, this time space emerges between the onslaughts and in this respite, room is found for new emotional depth. more expansive than ever before, ‘3d routine’ manages to maintain the rawness of a classic debut but it’s experimentation and variety portray a band unlikely to rest on their ‘guitar band’ chops. songwriter Dan Hyndman explains the genesis of the band as being “fairly boiler plate” a combination of friends old and new converging in Leeds post-uni to form a band predominantly united in their mutual affection for the Pavement back catalogue. finally settling on a lineup of Nick Grant (bass), Tyson (guitar) and Phil Porter (drums) the band’s progression has taken them far beyond this original vision.

having garnered local attention in the early days for their unhinged and often calamitous live shows in Leeds, it was the unlikely radio hit ‘Alternative Facts’, (clocking in at an uncompromising ten minutes) that brought the Mush to the attention of a wider audience. the song, one of the last releases for the legendary too pure singles club saw early support from Marc Riley and others on BBC 6music with them playing multiple sessions, and the follow up single, ‘Gig Economy’ hopping onto the 6music playlist. roaming further afield from their hometown, Mush spent the first half of 2019 heading out around the uk, earning a reputation for their intense live performances, supporting the likes of Girl Band, the Lovely Eggs, Yak, Shame and Stereolab, as well as releasing the ‘induction Party’ ep to great acclaim. at the tail end of summer of 2019 mush headed to Leeds’ green mount studio and with Andy Savours (dream wife, our girl, my bloody valentine) manning the mixing desk, their debut lp, ‘3d routine’ was born. the way in which the album brazenly moves from polished 3- minute punk tracks, to avant-garde spoken word, to sardonic-political funk, whilst sounding like the same band is testament to an uncompromisingly unrefined ethic and compounds the jarring nature of mush. together, the songs form a unified, abrasive, emotive, frenetic and entirely beguiling concoction of sound and opinion, a fast-moving snapshot of current times, relatable, politically minded and incredibly personal. music for those who want their guitars loud and weird, and their political commentary a little less ‘on the nose’.

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Leeds outfit Dead Naked Hippies return with a punchy new blinder in ‘Eyes Wide’, released last Friday.
Produced by Grammy and BRIT Award-nominated Tom Dalgety (Pixies, Royal Blood), and the follow-up to ‘Young Male Rage’, the track is a coming-of-age anthem.

‘Eyes Wide’ opens with stark guitar stabs before frontwoman Lucy Jowett takes centre stage with a bold, confident & striking vocal. The track builds into a huge chorus, culminating in the hook “With eyes wide, I am not blind.” It’s a huge statement of intent from the Leeds based band, showing they are ready to take arms.

“‘Eyes Wide’ is for the outsiders,” explains frontwoman Lucy Jowett, “the pieces that don’t quite fit the puzzle, those growing up & growing wiser but not by societal norms or expectation, instead blossoming in their own beautiful way. For those making their own shapes, decisions, perspectives, words and waves in their own time and seeing the world through their own eyes. 26 years in and I’m not the person the child or the teenage me thought I would be, or should be by expectation. No shame. ‘Eyes Wide’ is a celebration of it.”

There was a Leeds music scene at the time that revolved around the Leeds University Art Department, and local bands The Gang of Four and The Mekons were doing well. Kelvin had briefly replaced Hugo in The Gang of Four and was recommended to Delta 5 as a drummer. Kelvin and I played in a band in York together so I went along to audition and joined in May 1979.

First release “Mind Your Own Business” / “Now That You’ve Gone” – 1979. The Gang of Four were recording their album, Entertainment, in the WorkHouse in the Old Kent Road and they decided that they could help us out at the same time. We stayed with them on a houseboat on the Thames at Cheney Walk, Chelsea and their manager Rob Warr arranged for us to go in and record whilst they were out at a Madness/Specials gig in Camden.

“You” was supposed to be the first recording but it wasn’t happening so we changed tack and recorded both songs in about 8 to 10 hours. We had only been together a few months and done about 3 or 4 gigs by this time. Rob took the tapes to EMI who were paying for the studio but they passed – no surprise there – so Rob went to Geoff Travis at Rough Trade. Geoff came to see us at The Global Village (later Heaven) and we met him afterwards and agreed to a deal on a handshake.

John Peel was given a pre-release copy and he decided to play it twice that night. The next day we got a call asking if we’d like to do a session for him – yes please!! Then, we were off and running.

“Delta 5” and “Make Up” included on this CD are from that session of February 1980. We recorded a follow-up, “Anticipation” / “You” in February 1980. We were gigging more often at this point and “You” turned out pretty well. More gigging in Europe and the UK; around 1980 – 81, we played quite a bit at The Lyceum in London and shared the bill with The Gang of Four a few times, Echo and the Bunnymen, B52s, Specials, Teardrop Explodes and U2 to name a few. We toured with The Gang of Four and Pere Ubu in 1980.

In September 1980 we did our second Peel session, which included “Triangle,” which is included on this CD. Later in September 1980 we went to the USA.

We played New York and all along the East Coast. Then we went West, and “Shadow,” “Circuit,” and “Journey” are all from a show we did at the Berkeley Square in Berkeley, CA. Back to England in October and we recorded “Try”/ “Colour” with the Bad Manners horn section who we had met at a festival In Finland. In February 1981 we toured Holland and Belgium. In March 81 we signed with the Pre record label in April we went into Rak Studios in St John’s Wood to record an album. Rak was Mickie Most’s studios and The Animals, Hot Chocolate and Sweet had recorded there.

We experimented quite a bit on the album and perhaps we should have just recorded the songs as they were – the session versions included here are more a reflection of how we were live as they were all recorded quickly in one or two takes.

None of us really liked the title of the album but it was a compromise – I think we argued quite a lot back then. We did a UK tour culminating in a headline gig at The Venue London. We even had a horn section including Rico on trombone.

We went back to the USA for a few shows on the East Coast in May and came back to England in June. We recorded “Innocenti,” “Train Song,” “Final Scene” and “Singing The Praises” for a Richard Skinner session in July 1981.

The album came out somtime late in 1981 and we went to Holland in October – I decided it was time to leave when we got back – I think Julz and then Kelvin left and Bethan & Ros made one more single with new personnel before calling it a day in 1982.

The early days were the best and although we did argue a lot, (what band doesn’t!), we also had a lot of laughs – for a couple of years we got to play live and make some records, and then that was enough.

A “must have” best of by this influential 1980’s Leeds, UK group that is still name-checked and covered by current bands.