Posts Tagged ‘Lame-O Records’

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Since his old band LVL UP broke up, Dave Benton has shifted his focus towards his solo project Trace Mountains. His new album “Lost In The Country” is coming out in a couple of weeks, and we’ve already heard a couple of songs from it, the title track and “Rock & Roll.”

He’s sharing another new track, the lovely daydream “Me & May.” “There are two worlds,” Benton sings. “The one you’re making every day/ And the one that always gets away/ So just sing your silly song/ And someday soon we’ll all be/ Waking up on a hazy afternoon/ Drifting straight into a dream with only good things.”

“‘Me & May’ is a loose story about past-life connections,” Benton explains in a statement. “I wrote it right before we went into the studio to track drums. Our bass player Sean wants to open a café and call it Gasoline Horseys, inspired by the Sparklehorse song and the song is sort of about me & him. I asked my friend Carmen Perry to sing on the track.”

“Me & May” Lame-O Records Released on: 2020-03-26

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Slaughter Beach, Dog, the melancholy folk-rock project led by Modern Baseball’s Jake Ewald, contributed a new song  recently called “Yellow Teeth” to the COVID-19 relief compilation Don’t Stand So Close To Me back in March. It was the band’s first new song since last year’s phenomenal Safe And Also No Fear. Today they’re sharing their second new song of 2020, again for charitable reasons.

“Fair Shot” captures that same resigned ennui and graceful melodic beauty that made last year’s album such a gem. “Now all the day our hairs turn gray, Earth moves painfully slow,” Ewald sings. “We all get one fair shot, but I think that I forgot if mine came and went long ago.” Yet this one seems focused on concerns specific to this year. Ewald begins with a scene that has become familiar in the social distancing: “Under the sun I hear my sister in the street call out to me/ They pulled the car by close so she could see her family.” And it ends on a tragic note that really sneaks up on you given the music’s loose, sighing sway.

Bandcamp is again forgoing its share of sales, and Slaughter Beach, Dog are redirecting all proceeds from “Fair Shot” Philly Bail Fund. Hear and buy the song below, and check out our recent interview with Ewald while you’re at it.

“Fair Shot” · Slaughter Beach Dog available through Lame-O Records 
Released on: 2020-06-05

Gladie

Cayetana is no more, but singer Augusta Koch has stayed busy with other projects, including Sheena Anika & Augusta and Gladie. a collaborative project with Matt Schimelfenig (Three Man Cannon) who are now rounded out by bassist Ian Farmer (Modern Baseball) and drummer Pat Conaboy (The Spirit of the Beehive) — are set to release their debut album, Safe Sins, on February 28th.

The first single is “A Pace Far Different,” which, like Gladie’s EP, is more atmospheric than Cayetana, but finds Augusta’s voice in perhaps even more powerful form. She says, “This song is about feeling trapped by your own limitations and trying desperately to escape them. We tried to capture that sensation with the erratic production of the song, in that it focuses mainly around repetitive loops that are meant to mirror the feeling of spiraling.”

The very-Philadelphian Safe Sins sounds born of the same brotherly-love pop-punk that fuels groups like Remember Sports and Hop Along, translating years of ex-Cayetana vocalist Augusta Koch’s diaries into something a bit more universal, not to mention streamable. In addition to its early singles, “Even at Your Easel” stands out as one of the best examples of Koch’s ability to balance lyrics about the blue hues against upbeat instrumentation, peaking early with the warm guitar fill following the line “I listened to ‘Sleepwalker’ by The Kinks.” It’s certainly more overcast than “Sleepwalker,” but seems to harness the same literal restless energy.

Lame-O Records Released on: 2020-02-28

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The third LP from Slaughter Beach, Dog; released on Lame-O Records on August 2nd, 2019. Across the previous Slaughter Beach, Dog albums, Jake Ewald has crafted his sound. It’s one that incorporates pop music, indie-rock, folk, and just the faintest dash of punk in order to create something that’s accessible but still artistically rich. With Safe And Also No Fear, the band’s third album, Ewald has abandoned his usual practices in service of creating something richer.

Where he once offered tightly woven vignettes about characters that mirrored the people in his life, Safe And Also No Fear now finds Jake joined by a full band, spinning out songs that push and expand Slaughter Beach, Dog’s sonic boundaries in subtle, evocative ways. Opener “One Down” leans on a pedestrian acoustic pattern that plods in one ear and out the other. “I dress up nice/I feel all right/I get loaded/And I come home late at night,” Ewald sings, without enough conviction to absolve the cliché. He falls into a half-spoken drawl on “Dogs,” a tender discourse on human friendships (“I know he always understands me/Even when I am being evasive”), but the stream-of-consciousness melody feels as aimless as another night at the neighborhood bar.

“Black Oak” achieves a more affecting result by ditching the vocal melody altogether: “His belly warm with drink/He leaned into the freeway in the night/Investigating exit ramps/Waiting for a sign,” Ewald recounts in an unnerving deadpan. The guitars drop out as the song’s protagonist meets tragedy: “They found him at the black oak/They dug him up last night.” A looping coda evokes the spaced-out lapse of highway hypnosis, as if the band were cruising those darkened roads themselves.

After two LPs performed entirely by himself, the beach must’ve grown lonely; on Safe and Also No Fear, Ewald’s third album, he’s joined by a full ensemble that includes Modern Baseball bassist Ian Farmer, his first official reunion with a former bandmate since their indefinite hiatus. Together, they dive into the pared-down folk-rock Ewald had just begun to explore on previous solo releases.

Recorded and produced by Jake Ewald, Ian Farmer, Nick Harris, and Zack Robbins at The Metal Shop Studio in Philadelphia, PA.

Hailing from Berks County, PA, Shannen Moser grew up steeped in folk and country music. Influenced by the historically rich area, stretching farmland, and local folkers, Shannen credits the area with giving her the tools to write the music she does today, influencing her self-taught guitar plucking style and confessional lyricism. She vividly recalls her first encounter with folk music in her dad’s old truck, playing “I’ll Be Here In The Morning” by Townes Van Zandt. Since then, her love for songwriting has continued to grow.

In 2014 Shannen moved to Philadelphia and began pursuing music more earnestly. Her debut LP “Oh, My Heart” was released in January of 2017, and reissued by Lame-O Records later that Spring. Mostly recorded in a barn in Earlville, NY, the record brought a more expansive sound to her small bedroom recordings, moving Moser forward sonically as an artist while preserving the sincerity of her earlier work and showcasing Moser’s folk and country influences.

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Shannen Moser’s intimate sophomore album “I’ll Sing” was released on September 7th on Lame-O Records. An evocative and vulnerable storyteller, Shannen Moser’s narrative style makes every song on I’ll Sing like a short story, pulling listeners into the details while tackling big topics like heartbreak, loss, and battles with mental health. Written over a tumultuous year, Moser shows a willingness throughout the album to bear her scars, utilizing vulnerability in a way that feels powerful.

I’ll Sing was produced by Eric Muth and Cameron Konner at the Grey Ferry Warehouse in Philadelphia. Muth, Konner, and cello player and longtime touring band member Julia Peters were Moser’s backing band on the record.

Philadelphia power pop trio Hurry have just announced “Frustrate You”, a new two-song single out now on Lame-O Records. The new songs “Frustrate You” and “An Element Of Surprise”. What was once a solo project for principal songwriter Matt Scottoline has evolved into Hurry, a power pop trio from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania composed of Scottoline, Rob DeCarolis (Univox), and Joe DeCarolis (Psychic Teens). The DeCarolises are cousins and they are both very talented. “As talented as Matt Scottoline?” Of course. Please don’t attempt to pry the band apart with potentially hurtful questions.

Hurry’s album Every Little Thought was released on February 23rd, 2018 on Lame-O Records. The album, written by Scottoline, is a light and dreamy plunge into life’s crushingly relentless uncertainty and doubt. The album is more pop-driven than Hurry’s previous efforts, focusing on catchy melodies, hooks, and harmonies influenced by Teenage Fan club, Robyn Hitchcock, Yo La Tengo, and Guided By Voices. Of the new album, Scottoline — a natural salesman — says, “I tried even harder this time to make it good.”

Hurry released it’s previous album, Guided Meditation, on Lame-O Records in 2016. It was recorded at Noisy Little Critter with Mike Bardzik. The album was likely critically acclaimed, however Hurry does not place much value on things like “critical acclamation,” nor do they place much value on “awards.” In fact, Hurry did not even pay attention to 2017’s Grammy winners. Ultimately, who knows if Guided Meditation won any (or all) of those awards.
Since Guided Meditation’s release, Hurry has toured and played shows with Yuck, Nada Surf, and Tommy Keene, and have had their music featured on FXX’s Man Seeking Woman. Scottoline, however, is not sure how important any of that information actually is. “I don’t really think it is [important],” he says. Hm. You can judge for yourself.
Every Little Thought focuses on the general indecision of existence and how it can affect interpersonal relationships, as well as the frame of mind with which you approach day-to-day life. It is nice to listen to and it will make you smile.

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Band Members
Matt Scottoline, Rob DeCarolis, Joe DeCarolis

Larissa Sapko had set two goals for herself in the summer of 2013: find a job, and start a band. Once she got a job, the band wasn’t far behind. She asked her friend Kian Sorouri if he would like to play guitar (he did), and he in turn asked Jim Dobrowolski if he would like to play drums (he learned how, and he did). What It Is came out in December 2013, and Loose Tooth enjoyed a year of playing local shows and weekenders in the Northeast.

After hearing that Jimmy was moving to Costa Rica, Christian Bach and Kyle Laganella stepped forward and volunteered their shredding skills to keep Loose Tooth moving up and onward. After reworking their first EP What It Is and writing some new songs in the process, the band’s debut record Easy Easy East was ready to rip.

After touring on Easy Easy East throughout 2015, the band came together to start writing their follow up record Big Day. The songs on Big Day developed a more cohesive feeling as the four became more comfortable playing together. Big Day is set to be released in April of 2017 on Father/Daughter Records and Lame-O Records.

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Big Day comes out April 7th on Lame-O Records and Father/Daughter Records.
released March 15th, 2017

Thin Lips

Ahead of their upcoming album Chosen FamilyThin Lips have released a second single, titled “Gaslight Anthem (The Song Not The Band)” featuring vocal contributions from Frances Quinlan of Hop Along, Brendan Lukens of Modern Baseball, and Zoe Reynolds of Kississippi. And if that lineup doesn’t get you excited to hear it, what will?

Jumping right in with their characteristic interlocking riffs, frontwoman Chrissy Tashjian’s vocals layer on top wonderfully, mixed to perfection with the slightest bit of distance, singing “here I thought I was right next to you”. The chorus is even more touching, with all the vocal cameos entering. In lieu of exchanging vocals or harmonizing, here it feels more like paints mixing, one voice blending into the other, and the solos featuring slide guitar add a greater depth to the song’s already rich texture.

Between this track and the previous single, “A Song For Those Who Miss You All The Time,” one can get a sense of the crunchy, catchy brand of indie-punk Thin Lips are bringing to their new album, dropping July 27th on Lame-O Records

What was once a solo project for principal songwriter Matt Scottoline has evolved into the band Hurry, a power pop trio from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania composed of Scottoline, Rob DeCarolis (Univox), and Joe DeCarolis (Psychic Teens). The DeCarolises are cousins and they are both very talented

Hurry’s fourth album is packed front to back with breezy, beautiful songs that will please anyone who loves the classic, strummy power-pop of Teenage Fanclub, Tommy Keene and the Power Pop bands that we have recently featured. “Heatwave” sits in the center of the album and captures the band’s sweet ‘n’ sour sound. “Waiting For You” offers a subtle surf-rock vibe alongside main man Matt Scottoline’s lyrics about loneliness and screen addiction. “Read Between the Lines” is a tightly wound bundle of jangling guitars and reticence, while “On the Streets” is about as close as Hurry gets to punk pace.

Hurry’s album ‘Every Little Thought’ out on Lame-O Records out now.

The songs on Every Little Thought can handle the spotlight. They share a bunch of great qualities: mostly clean-sounding rhythm guitars, aching vocal melodies featuring lots of extended notes, a persistent sense of melancholy. Hurry’s rhythm section—cousins Joe and Rob DeCarolis on bass and drums, respectively—is prominent and invaluable, providing Scottoline’s songs with a sturdy backbone and some extra momentum.

“Waiting For You” appears on Hurry’s 2018 album “Every Little Thought,” available via Lame-O Records.

Band Members
Matt Scottoline, Rob DeCarolis, Joe DeCarolis