Posts Tagged ‘Lame-O Records’

Hailing from Berks County, PA, Shannen Moser grew up steeped in folk and country music. Influenced by the historically rich area, stretching farmland, and local folkers, Shannen credits the area with giving her the tools to write the music she does today, influencing her self-taught guitar plucking style and confessional lyricism. She vividly recalls her first encounter with folk music in her dad’s old truck, playing “I’ll Be Here In The Morning” by Townes Van Zandt. Since then, her love for songwriting has continued to grow.

In 2014 Shannen moved to Philadelphia and began pursuing music more earnestly. Her debut LP “Oh, My Heart” was released in January of 2017, and reissued by Lame-O Records later that Spring. Mostly recorded in a barn in Earlville, NY, the record brought a more expansive sound to her small bedroom recordings, moving Moser forward sonically as an artist while preserving the sincerity of her earlier work and showcasing Moser’s folk and country influences.

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Shannen Moser’s intimate sophomore album “I’ll Sing” was released on September 7th on Lame-O Records. An evocative and vulnerable storyteller, Shannen Moser’s narrative style makes every song on I’ll Sing like a short story, pulling listeners into the details while tackling big topics like heartbreak, loss, and battles with mental health. Written over a tumultuous year, Moser shows a willingness throughout the album to bear her scars, utilizing vulnerability in a way that feels powerful.

I’ll Sing was produced by Eric Muth and Cameron Konner at the Grey Ferry Warehouse in Philadelphia. Muth, Konner, and cello player and longtime touring band member Julia Peters were Moser’s backing band on the record.

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Philadelphia power pop trio Hurry have just announced “Frustrate You”, a new two-song single out now on Lame-O Records. The new songs “Frustrate You” and “An Element Of Surprise”. What was once a solo project for principal songwriter Matt Scottoline has evolved into Hurry, a power pop trio from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania composed of Scottoline, Rob DeCarolis (Univox), and Joe DeCarolis (Psychic Teens). The DeCarolises are cousins and they are both very talented. “As talented as Matt Scottoline?” Of course. Please don’t attempt to pry the band apart with potentially hurtful questions.

Hurry’s album Every Little Thought was released on February 23rd, 2018 on Lame-O Records. The album, written by Scottoline, is a light and dreamy plunge into life’s crushingly relentless uncertainty and doubt. The album is more pop-driven than Hurry’s previous efforts, focusing on catchy melodies, hooks, and harmonies influenced by Teenage Fan club, Robyn Hitchcock, Yo La Tengo, and Guided By Voices. Of the new album, Scottoline — a natural salesman — says, “I tried even harder this time to make it good.”

Hurry released it’s previous album, Guided Meditation, on Lame-O Records in 2016. It was recorded at Noisy Little Critter with Mike Bardzik. The album was likely critically acclaimed, however Hurry does not place much value on things like “critical acclamation,” nor do they place much value on “awards.” In fact, Hurry did not even pay attention to 2017’s Grammy winners. Ultimately, who knows if Guided Meditation won any (or all) of those awards.
Since Guided Meditation’s release, Hurry has toured and played shows with Yuck, Nada Surf, and Tommy Keene, and have had their music featured on FXX’s Man Seeking Woman. Scottoline, however, is not sure how important any of that information actually is. “I don’t really think it is [important],” he says. Hm. You can judge for yourself.
Every Little Thought focuses on the general indecision of existence and how it can affect interpersonal relationships, as well as the frame of mind with which you approach day-to-day life. It is nice to listen to and it will make you smile.

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Band Members
Matt Scottoline, Rob DeCarolis, Joe DeCarolis

Larissa Sapko had set two goals for herself in the summer of 2013: find a job, and start a band. Once she got a job, the band wasn’t far behind. She asked her friend Kian Sorouri if he would like to play guitar (he did), and he in turn asked Jim Dobrowolski if he would like to play drums (he learned how, and he did). What It Is came out in December 2013, and Loose Tooth enjoyed a year of playing local shows and weekenders in the Northeast.

After hearing that Jimmy was moving to Costa Rica, Christian Bach and Kyle Laganella stepped forward and volunteered their shredding skills to keep Loose Tooth moving up and onward. After reworking their first EP What It Is and writing some new songs in the process, the band’s debut record Easy Easy East was ready to rip.

After touring on Easy Easy East throughout 2015, the band came together to start writing their follow up record Big Day. The songs on Big Day developed a more cohesive feeling as the four became more comfortable playing together. Big Day is set to be released in April of 2017 on Father/Daughter Records and Lame-O Records.

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Big Day comes out April 7th on Lame-O Records and Father/Daughter Records.
released March 15th, 2017

Thin Lips

Ahead of their upcoming album Chosen FamilyThin Lips have released a second single, titled “Gaslight Anthem (The Song Not The Band)” featuring vocal contributions from Frances Quinlan of Hop Along, Brendan Lukens of Modern Baseball, and Zoe Reynolds of Kississippi. And if that lineup doesn’t get you excited to hear it, what will?

Jumping right in with their characteristic interlocking riffs, frontwoman Chrissy Tashjian’s vocals layer on top wonderfully, mixed to perfection with the slightest bit of distance, singing “here I thought I was right next to you”. The chorus is even more touching, with all the vocal cameos entering. In lieu of exchanging vocals or harmonizing, here it feels more like paints mixing, one voice blending into the other, and the solos featuring slide guitar add a greater depth to the song’s already rich texture.

Between this track and the previous single, “A Song For Those Who Miss You All The Time,” one can get a sense of the crunchy, catchy brand of indie-punk Thin Lips are bringing to their new album, dropping July 27th on Lame-O Records

What was once a solo project for principal songwriter Matt Scottoline has evolved into the band Hurry, a power pop trio from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania composed of Scottoline, Rob DeCarolis (Univox), and Joe DeCarolis (Psychic Teens). The DeCarolises are cousins and they are both very talented

Hurry’s fourth album is packed front to back with breezy, beautiful songs that will please anyone who loves the classic, strummy power-pop of Teenage Fanclub, Tommy Keene and the Power Pop bands that we have recently featured. “Heatwave” sits in the center of the album and captures the band’s sweet ‘n’ sour sound. “Waiting For You” offers a subtle surf-rock vibe alongside main man Matt Scottoline’s lyrics about loneliness and screen addiction. “Read Between the Lines” is a tightly wound bundle of jangling guitars and reticence, while “On the Streets” is about as close as Hurry gets to punk pace.

Hurry’s album ‘Every Little Thought’ out on Lame-O Records out now.

The songs on Every Little Thought can handle the spotlight. They share a bunch of great qualities: mostly clean-sounding rhythm guitars, aching vocal melodies featuring lots of extended notes, a persistent sense of melancholy. Hurry’s rhythm section—cousins Joe and Rob DeCarolis on bass and drums, respectively—is prominent and invaluable, providing Scottoline’s songs with a sturdy backbone and some extra momentum.

“Waiting For You” appears on Hurry’s 2018 album “Every Little Thought,” available via Lame-O Records.

Band Members
Matt Scottoline, Rob DeCarolis, Joe DeCarolis

Few bands can say they were born out of necessity, but Slaughter Beach, Dog can. In 2015, Jake Ewald, in the midst of trying to write songs for his other band Modern Baseball (which has since gone on hiatus), hit a patch of writer’s block. To get himself back in action, Ewald decided to move the focus off of himself, stitching together a loose narrative surrounding a motley cast of characters. Before he knew it, he’d written an entire album, and Slaughter Beach, Dog was no longer an exercise, it was a full-fledged band.

“When I gave myself the specific goal to write these kinds of songs and figure out how to do it, it just broke me open in a way I really needed.” What came pouring out of Ewald was “Welcome”, a 10-track debut that showed his ability to create a world of his own making, all the while blurring the line between fiction and reality. At times, he’d be singing about people and situations he invented, but the songs were still personal, often informed by experiences deep in his past, excavated for the purpose of expanding his songwriting vocabulary.

Slaughter Beach, Dog’s new album Birdie (Releases October 27th on Lame-O Records) expands upon the framework Ewald built on Welcome and the recent EP Motorcycle, retaining the hallmarks of Slaughter Beach, Dog while pushing into brave new territories A single listen to Birdie shows how much Ewald has grown as a songwriter, embellishing every detail in his songs without losing his homespun charms.

Where Welcome felt based in rock’s grand tradition, Birdie is at once more expansive and more intimate. Songs ebb and flow in the way of The Weakerthans, still rocking, but in a more scholarly way. “I took [Motorcycle .jpg] as an opportunity to get a little bit weirder than usual,” said Ewald, and it’s clear that the EP was a signpost for where he’d be taking Slaughter Beach, Dog on Birdie. “Gold And Green” sees Ewald skirt the lines between half a dozen genres, creating a song that’s able to mine vintage genres like folk and country in order to make something contemporary. Strumming an acoustic guitar, Ewald spins a narrative flush with details, boasting lyrics that are, depending on your reading, either wildly impressionistic and or plain as day.

Ewald plays into this ambiguity expertly, offering songs that use a lilting bounce to obscure the darkness of the world he’s building. “Fish Fry” is a prime example, utilizing a simple backbeat, a chugging guitar riff, and a ruminative vocal melody, the song allows Ewald to toss out references to his past work for those paying close attention. Much like on Motorcycle .jpg’s “Building The Ark,” Ewald once again finds himself dreaming of a convenience store, inviting fans to dig into his lyrics to unfurl every subplot running beneath his gooey melodies. Similarly, “Acolyte” closes the record but simultaneously opens a door, showing Ewald at his most introspectively ambitious. The song sprawls out, expanding slowly and deliberately, completing Birdie’s arch without providing any definitive answers.

Though Slaughter Beach, Dog may have started as a project for Ewald to get past a mental block, it’s grown into something more. Under this moniker Ewald has built a rich, vibrant world, one that invites thoughtful analysis from fans, and continues to expand past its initial intent. Birdie is bountiful in its scope, with songs that pile on layers of instruments and suck you into the world of Slaughter Beach, Dog. And once you’re there, you never want to leave.

“Acolyte” from the Slaughter Beach, Dog record ‘Birdie’, out 10/27 on Lame-O Records.

Philadelphia’s Modern Baseball has been one of the most refreshing and lovable surprises . Split into two halves and led by members Jake Ewald and Brendan Lukens respectively, their former themes of punk scene politics, fancying girls, and feeling awkward to deal primarily with personal struggles with death and depression. What sets them apart even further is the close relationship they have with their fans, from writing openly about difficult topics to consciously striving to make their live shows safe and accessible. Their remarkable ability to write nothing but great songs is what draws people in, but it’s their lack of pretense, sense of humor, and consideration that holds them close.

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Modern Baseball have evolved with every album, and this EP continues with that. They really are something special. Modern Baseball “clicked” for me a few weeks ago and now I’m hooked. This is a great step forward after the fantastic-ness that was “You’re Gonna Miss it All” .
Recorded, Mixed & Mastered in Philadelphia, PA
Produced by Modern Baseball

 

As a staple of the Glasgow live music scene The Pooches are a band to cherish, even if they perhaps don’t cherish themselves as much as they should. This self-titled debut album is as charming as it is riddled with self doubt. ‘I’ll be Gone’ is the perfect example of knowing your own qualities but not having the confidence to show them and by the time others realise it’s already too late. I can definitely relate. This record is absolutely bursting with indie-pop gems. Pure guitar pop crammed with melodies and all put together to sound uncomplicated and straightforward as the best pop music usually is. The album is often reminiscent of any number of 60s guitar bands and the sensitivity of the Vaselines. If you like nice things in your life get the The Pooches.

“The Light” off of The Pooches self titled debut LP out 9/9 on Lame-O Records