FONTAINES D.C. – ” A Hero’s Death ” (Live at Home for Later… with Jools Holland)

Posted: July 2, 2020 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
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Barely a year since their debut Dogrel earned them a spot as one of the most acclaimed new bands of 2019, Dublin’s Fontaines D.C. will return with “A Hero’s Death” on July 31 via Partisan Records. Arriving battered and bruised – albeit beautiful – the album is anything but a re-hash of the swaggering energy from their first record, instead the music is patient, confident, and complex – heady and philosophical takes on the modern world and its great uncertainty. The album serves as a conscious effort to subvert expectations, to challenge themselves and their listeners, and to sacrifice one identity in order to take on another – one that is fully their own.

We’re giving away handwritten lyrics by Grian for ‘I Don’t Belong’ & ‘A Hero’s Death’ and also a signed 7″. Pre-save ‘A Hero’s Death’ and follow us on Spotify by Monday 6th July for a chance to win fontainesDC.lnk.to/contest

Irish rockers Fontaines D.C. came out swinging on their debut album Dogrel—it became one of the years favourite albums of last year thanks to its propulsive rhythms, Grian Chatten’s mesmerizing speak-sing and their satisfying blend of post-punk, garage and surf sounds. After cementing themselves as one of the most exciting new bands of 2019, excitement began to swirl when news started circulating about a quick follow-up album that was recorded in Los Angeles and influenced by The Beach Boys. I figured an album full of surfy tunes like Dogrel highlight “Liberty Belle” and 2017 b-side “Winter in the Sun” was on the way, which I undoubtedly would’ve devoured, but that’s pretty far from what we’ll actually receive at the end of July.

A Hero’s Death is decidedly not perky—it’s full of somber, gothic numbers, slow ballads and a few very on-the-nose nods to Brian Wilson (but this is dejected Pet Sounds era Beach Boys—not the carefree “Surfin’ U.S.A.” Beach Boys). It’s not what many will expect from the group, but it’s a noticeably more mature second chapter that pays dividends with each listen. Sprinkled with ’60s armchair pop and ’80s post-punk references, this is a gloomy outdoor stroll record—but a very special one at that.

Fontaines D.C. perform A Hero’s Death Live at home for Later… with Jools Holland.

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