Posts Tagged ‘Death Valley Girls’

At the core of Death Valley Girls, vocalist/multi-instrumentalist Bonnie Bloomgarden and guitarist Larry Schemel channel a modern spin on Fun House’s sonic exorcisms, ZZ Top’s desert-blasted riffage, and Sabbath’s occult menace. On their third album Darkness Rains, Death Valley Girls churn out the hypercharged scuzzy rock every generation yearns for, but there is a more subversive force percolating beneath the surface that imbues the band with an exhilarating cosmic energy.

Album opener “More Dead” is a rousing wake up call, with a hypnotic guitar riff and an intoxicating blown-out solo underscoring Bloomgarden’s proclamation that you’re “more dead than alive.” The pace builds with “(One Less Thing) Before I Die”, a distillate of Detroit’s proto-punk sound. At track three, Death Valley Girls hit their stride with “Disaster (Is What We’re After)”, a rager that takes the most boisterous moments off Exile On Main Street and injects it with Zeppelin’s devil’s-note blues. Darkness Rains retains its intoxicating convocations across ten tracks, climaxing with the hypnotic guitar drones and cult-like chants of “TV In Jail On Mars”.

Released October 5th, 2018,
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We’ve only been waiting a little over two years with bated breath for “Darkness Rains“, the third release from California’s Death Valley Girls; anxious only because after the promise of 2014’s “Street Venom” and the astounding “Glow in the Dark” back in 2016, it seemed like it could be a tall order to move the dial.

Well it may be a cliché to say a band is evolving, finding themselves, maturing if you will, but “Darkness Rains” finds Death Valley Girls reaching another level.

The third album can be a difficult hurdle for an artist; it’s the record where they discover what they are made of often writing from a clean slate. Just as Led Zeppelin’s third album or The Clash with “London Calling” found the iconic bands hitting their stride, “Darkness Rains” hits the target . The ten tracks here showcase a band that has a shitload of confidence in their writing and sound, shedding a touch of the fuzzy garage rawness of “Glow in the Dark” for a tighter, leaner more glammed out Stooges-proto-metal hell-spawn type of rock and roll.

Psychedelic haze, giant arena rock riffs, scuzzed-out wah-wah solos from Larry Schemel litter practically every song, with vocalist/multi-instrumentalist Bonnie Bloomgarden’s banshee wail leading wicked sing-along choruses. Bassist Alana Amram and drummer Laura Harris combine for a gut punch of a rhythm section.

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It’s gothic, it’s psychedelic, it’s hypnotic, it’s rock and roll. “Darkness Rains”is an omnipotent force and Death Valley Girls are on the cusp of something big.

released October 5, 2018

At the core of Death Valley Girls, vocalist/multi-instrumentalist Bonnie Bloomgarden and guitarist Larry Schemel channel a modern spin on Fun House’s sonic exorcisms, ZZ Top’s desert-blasted riffage, and Sabbath’s occult menace. On their third album Darkness Rains, Death Valley Girls churn out the hypercharged scuzzy rock every generation yearns for, but there is a more subversive force percolating beneath the surface that imbues the band with an exhilarating cosmic energy.

Death Valley Girls ‘Darkness Rains’ out October 5th, 2018

Beyond-beyond excited to present to you “Disaster (Is What We’re After)” from our new record, Darkness Rains, out October 5th on Suicide Squeeze Records. Video starring Iggy Pop and directed by Kansas Bowling,

The Kansas Bowling-directed clip is a direct homage to a scene in Danish filmmaker Jørgen Leth’s 1982 film, 66 Scenes of America, in which Andy Warhol eats a hamburger. Iggy Pop of course puts his own spin on the simple activity, nodding along to Death Valley Girls’ infectious rocker and even taking a healthy, low-carb approach halfway through when he discards one of the buns.

“We’re strong believers in opti-mysticism and connecting with people through rock n’ roll,” Death Valley Girls said of the video. “Having Iggy dig our music was more than amazing for us. When [director] Kansas told us she had a dream about recreating the ‘Andy Warhol Eating a Hamburger’ short film but with Iggy starring for our music video, we were cautiously excited about the possibility. Next thing we know we’re in Miami with Iggy himself, and a rock n’ roll dream became reality!”
Album opener “More Dead” is a rousing wake up call, with a hypnotic guitar riff and an intoxicating blown-out solo underscoring Bloomgarden’s proclamation that you’re “more dead than alive.” The pace builds with “(One Less Thing) Before I Die”, a distillate of Detroit’s proto-punk sound. At track three, Death Valley Girls hit their stride with “Disaster (Is What We’re After)”, a rager that takes the most boisterous moments off Exile On Main Street and injects it with Zeppelin’s devil’s-note blues. Darkness Rains retains its intoxicating convocations across ten tracks, climaxing with the hypnotic guitar drones and cult-like chants of “TV In Jail On Mars”.

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Releases October 5th, 2018

Pretty much all you need to know about Death Valley Girls can be summed up by the line from the 1975 sexploitation film Switchblade Sisters that became the band’s unofficial slogan: “Everybody’s gotta be in a gang.” All those images of leather-clad, grime-covered, rebellious fun that such a phrase evokes are just what the Los Angeles quartet personifies. It’s slightly crazy, completely sexy, and just frightening enough that you want nothing more than to be inducted into the club.

Luckily, Death Valley Girls are sending an open invitation with their sophomore record, Glow in the Dark. On Burger Records, the follow-up to 2014’s Street Venom plays like a beacon from space sent to incite a cultural mutiny. Tracks like “Love Spell” and “Disco” beckon the listener to shed the chains of repressive modesty in favor of letting loose in the neon light of the night. “Horror Movie” and “I’m a Man Too” strike out at the definitions laid down by a society enslaved to consumerism and clearly delineated classifications. All of it bursts out in surfy proto-punk layered with sugary shrill harmonies that cut through the garage door like so many steel studs.

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If the message of the album isn’t clear enough, this band delivers  “Join the experience that will cosmically unite the living and turn on the dead. The battle is now, Be part of the revolution. Glow in the dark.

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L.A.’s Death Valley Girls are a menacing sight to behold. Tough, uncompromising and like their music, battle ready, the band take no prisoners with their snot-rock menace and occasional psych nuance. ‘Disco’ is the anthemic second track from 2016’s balls-out LP ‘Glow in the Dark’an album that cemented Death Valley Girls into the psyches of all who are worth their salt.

As terrible as disco really is -this, by the way, is not a disco song and would quite possibly have John Travolta twitching in a fit of high-pitched conniptions- this pop/rock gem actually makes going to the disco sound like a hell of a lot of fun and frivolity.

So, stand up, thrust your hips or whatever the hell it is people do at discos and prepare for the big night with this goosebump-inducing sing-a-long, ‘Disco’ by the one and only Death Valley Girls.

 

Death Valley Girls – “Gettin’ Hard” Live in West Hollywood, CA at the Filth Mart, The name makes you wonder what you might be getting into by playing their music or heading to one of their live show. The simple answer is that you’d better be prepared — to have a good time!

Death Valley Girls aren’t from Death Valley, but being based in Los Angeles they are close enough. And although they are female-fronted, the Girls also counts a couple dudes among their members. Between them they whip up a firestorm of slightly psychedelic, ’60s-leaning, fuzz guitar-laden garage rock, just the kind of thing you’d want to soundtrack a trek through the desert when you’re out of your mind on mescaline. Or just out of your mind with anticipation as you head to the rock club on a Saturday night.

Bonnie Bloomgarden, the lead singer for Death Valley Girls, has a voice that can sound sweet and innocent when she wants it to and while none of the band’s music is rough, it still has a quality about it that conjures up images of girls gone bad, like there’s a stiletto lurking somewhere in those fish net stockings. For sure the music of Death Valley Girls, as exemplified by that found on their current album Street Venom, will hold you at musical knife point. And you won’t mind a bit.

For some bands music is an imperative, an act of urgency. It’s guttural, primal. Not just in their sound, but in their actions and instincts. And in the true Garage Rock spirit that so infused bands like The Stooges, the Death Valley Girls are all about their actions right down to their most base instincts.

What sounds like their musical ethos, summed up to perfection, actually has nothing to do with music at all. It almost seems as if the band somehow see something of themselves in the skateboarders they have just been watching, and are excitedly telling us about. Even if they don’t realise it themselves. Kindred spirits. And this is a band searching for like minds.  their love for other bands, they talk with utter passion and excitement about bands they have worked with and toured with. Their generosity of spirit, and genuine passion for these artists is compelling and infectious. Other bands would not miss an opportunity like this to self publicise, but for the Death Valley Girls when asked about music, they can’t help do anything except be honest.

Check out their recent single “Electric High”, they drive straight through you, right to where the excitement is.

They are working as hard as any band out there. Touring constantly and releasing single after single. Coming straight to SXSW from a tour with their favourite band of the moment, Wand. And leaving SXSW to release and single and go almost straight back on the road with Australian duo Palmer Gooch. It seems like an old fashioned approach to making music,

 

Death Valley Girls

 

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When Rock and Roll is played fast, hard and loud, it makes for glorious noise. Death Valley Girls remind us exactly how Rock and Roll should sound. Let’s get to know them a little better the band are from  Los Angeles.with musical influences like
Bo Diddley, Iggy/Stooges, Black Sabbath, MC5, Velvets, Little Eva, Godzilla, 1977, 1966 , Roky Erickson, Seeds, Electric Eels, Lester Bangs…how can you go wrong they also love Vinyl .

Favourite Books   Be my baby- Ronnie Spector autobiography, lots of Phil Spector – OG girl group – invent the world you want insight  The Family- Ed Sanders,  Hollywood Babylon- Kenneth Anger, Supernatural Strategies for Making a Rock and Roll Band – Ian Svenonius,  From the Velvets to the Voidoids- Clinton Heylin , Sleazoid Express- Bill Landis and Michelle Clifford

But we’re reading tons on tour so this all might change !!

 

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Dateline: California- 1969- Charles Manson & Altamont, the hippie utopian dream was over, the end of the 60’s gave way to the excess of Kim Fowley’s 70’s Hollywood- hitchhikers, runaways, outlaws, wanderers, draft dodgers, punks & rock n’ roll as lifestyle/religion.
Death Valley Girls remember Kim Fowley’s Hollywood, Rodney’s English Disco, the Starwood and Jeffrey Lee Pierce.
Death Valley Girls are a Californian rock n’ roll band, a gang of five. Bonnie on vocals/guitar & feedback, Jessie on twilight zone vocals. Bobby on teenage delinquent bass. Larry on proto-punk fuzz guitar and the kid on detention & drums. They’ve all done time in other bands- Feeding People.Gap Dream, Flytraps, Witnesses, Flesheaters, maybe more but that don’t matter anymore.They’re a family now.


They have releases on Burger Records & Lolipop Records, live shows have been a constant- L.A. clubs/all ages/house party’s and tours. They’re a travellin’ band prepared for end times, guitar, drums & tambourines are stocked away in Death Valley for the celebration, Death Valley Girls are gonna have a real cool time while they’re here, join them.

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