Posts Tagged ‘Andrew Savage’

Image may contain: one or more people

Brooklyn’s Parquet Courts are the rock ‘n’ roll band we deserve in 2018, and “Wide Awake” is a major stylistic stride in the band’s growing discography. On the album’s title track, singer Andrew Savage’s decisive vocals guide a danceable beat in the spirit of David Byrne, with globally minded percussion and bells and whistles galore. Gritty bass lines from Sean Yeaton are crisp and prominent, alongside everything from Afro-beat rhythms to stoner-punk anthems. With production by Danger Mouse, this is some of the most intriguing rock we’ve heard thus far this year.

Parquets Courts‘ fifth album Wide Awake! – produced by Danger Mouse – is a groundbreaking work, an album about independence and individuality but also about collectivity and communitarianism. The songs, written by Andrew Savage and Austin Brown but elevated to even greater heights by the dynamic rhythmic propulsion of Max Savage (drums) and Sean Yeaton (bass), are filled with their traditional punk rock passion, as well as a lyrical tenderness. The record reflects a burgeoning confidence in the band’s exploration of new ideas in a hi-fi context.

From Parquet Courts’ album ‘Wide Awake!’, out 18th May on Rough Trade Records.

Parquet Courts - Wide Awake!

Parquets Courts’ fifth album Wide Awake! – produced by Danger Mouse – is a groundbreaking work, an album about independence and individuality but also about collectivity and communitarianism. The songs, written by Andrew Savage and Austin Brown but elevated to even greater heights by the dynamic rhythmic propulsion of Max Savage (drums) and Sean Yeaton (bass), are filled with their traditional punk rock passion, as well as a lyrical tenderness. The record reflects a burgeoning confidence in the band’s exploration of new ideas in a hi-fi context.

From Parquet Courts’ album ‘Wide Awake!’, out 18th May on Rough Trade Records.  *deluxe vinyl with 16-page double booklet of art and illustration by A. Savage available

Parquet Courts get funky on their latest with a little help from producer Danger Mouse. Whistles! Parquet Courts’ new album, Wide Awake! is out May 18th.

Parquet Courts have announced that they will release their fifth album ‘Wide Awake!’ – produced by Danger Mouse due on 18th May, and the band will be heading out on a worldwide tour in support.

On working with producer Danger Mouse, A. Savage explains: “The ethos behind every Parquet Courts record is that there needs to be change for the better, and the best way to tackle that is to step out of one’s comfort zone. I personally liked the fact that I was writing a record that indebted to punk and funk, and Brian’s a pop producer who’s made some very polished records. I liked that it didn’t make sense.”

For both Savage and co-frontman Austin Brown, this record represents the duality of coping and confrontation. “In such a hateful era of culture, we stand in opposition to that — and to the nihilism used to cope with that — with ideas of passion and love,” says Brown. He goes onto say that he found himself “writing songs I’ve been wanting to write but never had the courage” on this record.

A deluxe vinyl includes a 16-page double booklet of art and illustration by the band’s Grammy-nominated artist A. Savage – available exclusively from the Rough Trade Records webstore and all other indie relatailers. Here’s a sneak peek:  get a load of “Almost Had To Start A Fight / In And Out Of Patience” – the first (double shot!) track to be unleashed from the album:

Parquet Courts have a new album on the way this year, but the band’s Andrew Savage has been keeping plenty occupied with his own solo material. He released a full-length solo album last fall and recently wrapped up a solo tour, where he performed covers from the Cranberries and the Fall. We’ve heard his version of “Linger” and today he’s sharing his take on “Frightened” from the late Mark E. Smith. .

http://

A. Savage in Session at BBC Radio 6

A. Savage – Guitar, Vocals
Jack Cooper – Keys
Jarvis Taveniere – Bass, Vocals
Aaron Neveu – Drums

 

Luppi’s follow up to his concept album about Rome is a concept album about Milan, but weirdly enough it could also be a tribute to some of the great bands that have come out of NYC. Featuring Karen O and the Parquet Courts’ member Andrew Savage, the songs tell tales of the misfits of that great Italian city but they come on sounding like Television, Talking Heads and James Chance, as well as later Yeah Yeah Yeah’s and the Courts themselves. A killer pop record on Dangermouse’s label.

Parquet Courts have released “Berlin Got Blury,” the second upcoming single from their forthcoming album Human Performance. A tale of existential dread in a foreign city, it’s also one of the catchiest songs they’ve ever done. The song’s video, directed by Claes Nordwall, was shot in Berlin with singer Andrew Savage struggling with loneliness, German pay phones and giant shawarma. Savage says this about it:

“Berlin Got Blurry” is a song about saying goodbye to someone from the other side of the world and about feeling completely foreign to your environment; knowing you can’t go home, but not knowing where you belong. I wrote the song in Berlin, so it made sense to try to recreate my experience for the video. It was shot on 16mm by the wonderful, talented and patient Claes Nordwall, who was able to take my very loose concept and make it into something really beautiful.

Most videos these days seem like an afterthought but “Berlin Got Blurry” is worth your three minutes and change

On “No No No!”, the opener of Parquet Courts’ new mini-LP Monastic Living, Andrew Savage declares in a mangled grunt, “I don’t want to be called a poet/ Don’t want to hang in a museum/ Don’t want to be cited, tacked onto your cause/ No, no, no/ I’m just a man.” From a band who’ve typically resisted disenchantment against the odds, it’s an alarming statement of rejection. On 2012’s Light Up Gold, Savage and co-songwriter Austin Brown blazed through mundane minutiae–”train death paintings, anti-meth murals”–yet saw beauty in the banality; on last year’s “Content Nausea”, released as Parkay Quarts, Savage yelled denunciations of the digital era in excited bursts, like a smalltown newsreader reporting alien landings. Pitched between stoner gags and urgent instructions, their sizzling one-liners felt like a bulwark against capitalist dread, the battle between righteousness and resignation. Monastic Living, their debut EP for Rough Trade presumably ahead of a full-length in the new year, is them saying, “We’re tired, that’s enough.”
“No No No!” is unique to the record, in that it has words, a hook, a rhythm you could tap, a sonic and philosophical destination, and replay value. In the liner notes, the track’s expanded lyric sheet blends cliché (“We’re just a band,” “retreat into solitude”) and aphorism—”Perhaps silence is purity of spirit”—into a grave mission statement. The remaining eight tracks aren’t just wordless but tuneless; they’re sometimes baffling, often boring, and always deliberately so.


Part of what makes “No No No!” work is that its litany of targets—”open letters, long reads”—is broad enough to appeal to everyone’s digital unease. Parquet Courts are resolutely unchill (“Life’s lived best when scrolling least,” Savage sang on “Content Nausea”), bewildered by the hot takes and the jostling think-pieces, as are we all. But these are popular targets, and without the counterweight of wit, Parquet Courts’ grand disavowal feels reactionary. On Monastic Living, they make a personal decision to reject a web culture constantly renegotiating what it means to be socially conscious (“I don’t want to be an essayist!” begins Savage’s salvo), and in doing so they reclaim art’s right to political neutrality. As statements go, it’s fine but hardly revolutionary—a passionate shrug.
Redeeming moments in the music are scarce. One is “Vow of Silence”, with its clattering drums, pleading, squealing guitars, and haywire arpeggios, which resemble the misfiring pistons of a manic brain. “Alms for the Poor”, comprising several seconds of a postpunk riff that dies suddenly, sounds like the husk of a practice session; a chugging number called “Monastic Living I.” is Battles without the epiphanies.


Unlike that paragon of artistic rejection, Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music, which actually coheres rather nicely, the EP has little textural detail; the music is not immersive, much less transcendent. It isn’t just a score to modern ennui but a work that itself feels indifferent. Yet it’s presented with a straight face: The band are touring the EP and we can buy it, though I’m unsure why anyone would—perhaps its existence as a paid-for product is part of the statement. What it means for the band’s future is, for now, a mystery, though not the kind it is fun to unravel.