Posts Tagged ‘Albany’

If you told us even as recently as six weeks ago that we’d be working on a Redux version of Black Sabbath’sVolume 4 and, before the end of March, artists including The Obsessed, Whores, Zakk Wylde, and Matt Pike would have all committed to be part of the project, we would’ve probably answered, “Wow.”

And if you’d then said, “Oh yeah, you’ll also assemble a Best of Black Sabbath companion LP featuring Earthless, Elephant Tree, Year of the Cobra, and tons of other great artists including a whole crop of brand-new Magnetic Eye roster bands, who by the way you’ll find time to sign during all the madness of your Vol. 4 Kickstarter,” we’d have most likely said, “piss off.” And yet, here we are, and all of the above has come to pass.

We are indeed reduxing Volume 4 and offering up a Best of Sabbath companion record, we do have some of the greatest heavy artists in the world committed to be part of this project, and we did somehow find time to sign three new bands during all of this, each of whom we’ll have a new record coming from later this year, and all of whom we’re inviting to be part of the project.

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“Something often lost: Life is process, not product,” sings Patrick Kindlon on “Unlicensed Guidance Counselor,” perhaps the most poignant track on Cheer. Drug Church’s third album is a tribute to that “process.” Kindlon’s protagonists are studies in humanity, captured with a photographer’s eye, a poet’s ear, and a comic’s timing. The titular “Unlicensed” advisor offers “guidance” via hilarious/horrifying anecdotes as good as anything in Confederacy Of Dunces … mashed up with platitudes lifted from Dark Knight dialogue. It’s perfection: Kindlon is on some zen-master shit and his lessons are delivered over bangers indebted to Pixies, Fugazi, and countless other erstwhile bash-and-poppers largely lost to time. Such is life. Cherish the moments. Trust the process. Buy this product.

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Band Members
Patrick-vocals, Chris-drums, Nick-guitar, Patrick-bass, Cory-guitar,

Bruce Springsteen has just released two new concerts into his ever-growing list of shows available as made-on-demand CD-Rs and digital downloads at nugs.net.  The first  show is from February 7th, 1977 in Albany, New York and the second is from the next night, February 8th in Rochester, New York.  They are significant as no soundboards from this portion of Bruce Springsteen’s touring career have ever surfaced before, and because they also feature a song which sees its first official release here:  “Action in the Streets.”

The years 1976 and 1977 were a bit trying for Springsteen.  After the breakthrough success of Born to Run in 1975, he and the E Street Band embarked on a long tour to promote the album.  The touring was to have lasted about a year and then work was to begin on a new album.  However, Springsteen became involved in litigation with his former manager Mike Appel and was barred from entering the studio.  Therefore, in order to bring in revenue, the tours continued.

These two concerts kick off what was to become the last leg of the tour, as the various lawsuits would be settled in May of 1977 and Bruce and his band would immediately begin work on Darkness on the Edge of Town.  The Darkness song “Something in the Night” is performed both nights with alternate lyrics from the later album version.  Two songs eventually cut from the album are also featured: “Rendezvous” and “The Promise.”  “Backstreets” from Born to Run also features expanded lyrics in its mid-section.  Springsteen covers Eddie Floyd one night with “Raise Your Hand.” In addition, the soul-tinged “Action in the Streets” makes its first official release with these two recordings.  Despite being performed at every show during this 1977 tour, Springsteen never laid it down in the studio.  Springsteen and The E Street Band are joined here by The Miami Horns in a different line-up from the one that recorded with fellow New Jersey musician Southside Johnny.

These two shows come from Front of House mix tapes recorded by Chas Gerber.  There are a couple of dropouts due to the tapes being flipped during the performances.  However, between the two shows, a complete version of each song is available.  The digital transfers and restoration were made by John K. Chester and Jamie Howarth, using the Plangent Process.  The concerts have been mastered by Jon Altschiller.