Posts Tagged ‘Thee Oh Sees’

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The now renamed prolific Californian band Thee Oh Sees pulls way back on the prog-metal influences of recent efforts, trading much of that for dynamic, staccato avant-punk in the first half and easing into delicious psych rock in the second. Highlights: “Dreary Nonsense,” “If I Had My Way,” “Gong of Catastrophe” “In the swirling and undulant warm mud of jettisoned reels of magnetic tape, blurps up the fog of reinvention. Every night I would parley with my pilots and run and rerun the recordings. Right up until the moment sleep slips its veil over eyes and ears and you drift back without a sound. Protean Threat dream haze becomes Panther Rotate in the other dimension.

A companion LP of remixes, field recordings, and sonic experiments using all sounds generated by the him and crackle of the desert farm. “A second version of our Protean Threat if you will, but barely conspicuous in its relation. Forward, never straight! Sunrise, sunset. Two lives connected by a cosmic thread, One for your feet and one for your head. For fans of Thee Oh Sees, Oh Sees, OCS, The Oh Sees, Osees…etc etc etcetcetc…be well.” —John Dwyer

Image of Thee Oh Sees - An Odd Entrances

From the same misty mountaintop tape spool as August’s A Weird Exits, Thee Oh Sees bring the companion album An Odd Entrances.

Delving more towards the contemplative than the faceskinning aspects of its predecessor, this sister album is a cosmic exercise en plein aire with John Dwyer and company double-drum shuffling, lounging with cellos, following a flute around the groove, and spooling a few Grimm-dark lullabies along the way. Lurking in the grass are a snake or two, like the celestial facing instrumental buzz of “Unwrap The Fiend Pt. 1.”…But for the most part this is a relatively hushed affair, a morning rather than evening listen.

The band plans on donating half their profits from the first pressing to Elizabeth House, a local charity in Pasadena that specifically helps homeless women with children get back on their feet.

Image of Public Service Broadcasting - Live At Brixton

Public Service Broadcasting are pleased to reveal the release of a double LP/CD live album of their sold-out performance at Brixton Academy from ‘The Race For Space’ Tour, recorded on 29th November 2015. A taster of this release can be viewed here as the band perform their celebration of the moon landings with crowd favourite, ‘Go’ https://youtu.be/y8rNlFYRcgs

“We first talked about the possibility of a live album and DVD a long while before Brixton and I have to confess that I ruled it out almost immediately” says frontman J. Willgoose, Esq. “I was persuaded over a few months, though, by both the reaction on the night – which was overwhelming – and of those who watched the stream as it went out live, that something special had occurred and it truly was worth documenting. Brixton had been a dream of mine ever since seeing the Manics there on their Everything Must Go tour many moons ago. Playing there as Public Service Broadcasting, and selling it out, was something I never even thought of as a possibility. It’s my favourite venue in the world and we wanted to make it a show to remember.”

The show features arena-level production crammed onto the Brixton stage with a 13- piece choir, 5-piece string section, expanded brass section, a longer set list, Smoke Fairies guesting on Valentina, a surprise special guest, dancers, pyrotechnics and more as the London-based band wow a hometown crowd with a very special performance. The release will be accompanied by a DVD filmed on the night along with an audio commentary from the band and bonus features.

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In the two and a half years since the release of their last album Rookie, Brisbane’s The Trouble With Templeton have, says frontman Thomas Calder, been busy “breaking down and re-assembling what it means to make music for us.” On the evidence of the richly confident and clear-sighted Someday, Buddy, released through Bella Union, that time was well spent. The full-bodied songs here can take the emphasis, no trouble. The Trouble With Templeton weren’t slouching on Rookie, where Calder and company wedded vibrant melodies and multifarious alt-rock flavours – epic, jangly, glam – to a core of emotive cogency. On Someday, Buddy, however, their personality emerges sharper and clearer. “Our goal was to make a record that is raw, bare and honest,” says Calder, a claim borne out by the incisive lyrics of the swelling Sailor and lilting Heavy Trouble, where Calder’s falsetto dances over a tender indie folk backdrop. Sometimes fragile, sometimes forceful, Calder’s voice remains a marvel on Bad Mistake, a combination of intricate verses and a huge chorus pitched somewhere between Pavement and Elliott Smith. Someday, Buddy’s recipe is one of slow burn songs harbouring great reserves of potency: the discreet neo glam swagger of Complex Lips, the sunburst chorus of Vernon, the gorgeous ripples of album highlight 1832.

The last shadow puppets the dream synopsis ep packshot

 

The EP was recorded live in one day at Future-Past Studios, Hudson NY and features new versions of album favourites ‘Aviation’ and ‘The Dream Synopsis’ alongside a selection of cover versions, first heard live during The Last Shadow Puppets’ summer touring. Expanding their trademark rawkous rock sound with a swagger and confidence rarely heard though their short but illustrious career, this is a bold and enthralling expansion of their already venerable sonic palette.

Image of The Rolling Stones - Blue & Lonesome

Their first studio album in over a decade. Recorded in just three days in London, England, this is an album full of their passion for the music that has always been at the heart and soul of the band – Blues.

Recorded in three days in December last year at British Grove Studios in West London, just a stone’s throw from Richmond and Eel Pie Island where the Stones started out as a young blues band playing pubs and clubs. The credits say it all, in the way this project was approached to play live in the studio without overdubs. Mick Jagger (vocals & harp), Keith Richards (guitar), Charlie Watts (drums), and Ronnie Wood (guitar), plus their long time touring sidemen Darryl Jones (bass), Chuck Leavell (keyboards) and Matt Clifford (keyboards). For two of the twelve tracks the Stones were also joined by old friend Eric Clapton.

‘Blue & Lonesome’ sees the Rolling Stones tipping their hats to the blues roots with tracks of intense spontaneity. It’s hard to believe that this is a record made by musicians in their sixth decade of recording. In their very early days the Stones played the music of Jimmy Reed, Willie Dixon, Eddie Taylor, Little Walter and Howlin’ Wolf – artists whose songs are featured on this album.

Image of Various Artists - The Reverb Conspiracy Volume 4

Reverb Conspiracy Vol. 4 is a collection of 12 tracks from some of the best in Europe’s unfathomably fruitful psych scene – offering a plethora of gems of the rock and roll, kraut, shoegaze, folk and garage-rock variety, and just about everything in-between. The highlights of the record include the dark, discordant ‘krautgaze’ of My Invisible Friend, the mammoth 15 minute spaced-out jam from Giobia, the ominous and mind-altering Ulrika Spacek and the kaleidoscopic splendor of Josefin Ohrn + The Liberation. Volume 4 also boasts immersive cuts from the likes of The Madcaps, Soft Walls, Pretty Lightning, The Oscillation and Fuzz Club’s own otherworldly psych juggernauts TAU, 10000 Russos, The Orange Revival and Throw Down Bones – each and every track is a piece of experimental sonic mastery in its own unique and distinct right.

Thee Oh Sees Announce Tour

Thee Oh Sees have announced a tour in support their newest record, “Mutilator Defeated At Last”, which came out in May via Castle Face. Beginning with three nights at San Francisco, CA’s The Chapel, the garage rock outfit will tour the States through September;

Thee Oh Sees perform “I Was Denied” at 285 Kent in Brooklyn and discuss the energy of a typical live show.
new album Mutilator Defeated At Last arrives May 18 via Castle Face. After sharing the album opener “Web”, they’ve let go of another track, “Withered Hand”. Listen to it above.
The band is also taking part in the 50 Bands & a Cat for Indiana Equality compilation, which is out digitally today on Indianapolis label Joyful Noise and can be downloaded at Joyful Noise’s website. Listen to their track “The Ceiling” below. All proceeds from the comp benefit Freedom Indiana, the ACLU of Indiana, and Indy Pride.

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Previously unreleased track from Thee Oh Sees, found on the benefit compilation “50 Bands & A Cat for Indiana Equality”.

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Here we have a new batch from Thee Oh Sees for your absorption – nine muscular tunes primed to pummel to. Last year’s Drop was more schizophrenic, ranging from heavy to whimsical and back – Mutilator Defeated At Last has more in common with the monolithic hugeness of Floating Coffin – with only two slight reprieves in heaviness this is a record made to be played loudly and that demands bodily sacrifice inherently. Despite the plutonium heavy feel, Thee Oh Sees continue to be omnivorous – synths and acoustic guitars expertly wind their way throughout like veins of gold through granite – any and all that stands in its way will be devoured and assimilated. This is the sound of a band doing what they do best, and it’s out on Castle Face Records May 18th.

Californian garage-psych overlords Thee Oh Sees are one of the most dependably badass live bands on the indie rock touring landscape, and they continue to crank out new records like there’s no tomorrow, hiatuses be damned. The band’s new album “Mutilator Defeated At Last” is the band’s ninth studio full-length, and that’s not counting the many smaller releases they’ve scattered like sand across the world. On first listen, the album has a funkier sense of rhythmic push and pull than we’re used to hearing from this band, but it’s as dependably strange and muscular and all-over-the-map as always. Check out tracks “Web” and “Withered Hand,”

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Thee Oh Sees San Fransisco band
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