Posts Tagged ‘Steve Terebecki’

Less than a year after their last album Performance, the ever-prolific White Denim are back with their eighth record “Side Effects”. More in line with the experimental, freewheeling spirit of their fan-favourite record Last Day of Summer than anything else they’ve done since, Side Effects is a record that captures the essence of the band’s full-throttle live shows. Featuring a rotating cast of band members led by James Petralli and Steve Terebecki, these tracks draw on the sounds of different personnel to create a cohesive whole – the result being an album that’s as varied and vivacious as anything they’ve ever done.

“I keep a few CDs of demos and rough mixes in my car, and when the radio gets unbearable, I’ll put them on to see if I feel anything,” Petralli says on how Side Effects first found life. “The songs on Side Effects are ones I heard from these demos – they were the ideas that sounded the most developed to me. I had this feeling that just because these tracks weren’t the right fit for the previous records, doesn’t mean that they couldn’t go on to be great in the right context.”

With that in mind, Side Effects takes on a more incisive feel than previous White Denim records. Contrary to Performance – the story of a questioning performer on stage – Side Effects is the off-stage life of the man behind the makeup. Spearheaded by Petralli and Terebecki (who tag-teamed production and called in specific talents from their rolodex of musicians), Side Effects has the feeling of a band providing fan service in a way only White Denim could do – by referencing their own material and putting out a record for fans to dig deep into. “We don’t put any limitations on what the band could do or should do in the studio,” says Petralli.

The album’s opening track, ‘small talk (feeling control)’, barrels out of the gate with a garage-rock prowess not heard from the band since the days of Workout Holiday. Not only does it invoke nostalgia for the band’s early days, but its second verse is also from the first batch of lyrics Petralli ever wrote for the band. “When we made Workout Holiday, we captured a feeling that comes from having fun and playing music on the weekend. I’m always looking for that feeling in the room – to get everyone laughing and playing well. ‘small talk’ is a great example of that.”

‘Reversed Mirror’ meanwhile comes directly from the stage as another take on the live favourite. An expertly crafted instrumental, it’s a reworking of both ‘Mirrored in Reverse’ and ‘Mirrored and Reverse’ and perfectly captures the raw, improvisational nature of the live band. ‘Shanalala’ on the other hand sees them embracing a post-punk side in the vein of Suicide – all stuttering, off-kilter electronics and breakneck drum machines. It’s a track that beautifully captures the playful attitude of the album – a song that shows off one of the many outfits White Denim have in their wardrobe.

Then there’s the album’s centrepiece – the six-minute odyssey ‘NY Money’. It features the backbone of the current live incarnation of the band on record (Petralli, Terebecki, Michael Hunter – Keys, Greg Clifford – Drums) and effortlessly traverses through the sounds of Soft Machine and Trans Am. “I cobbled the lyrics together from an old notebook I had on tour in 2015,” Petralli says. “It was after a night of drinking with The War on Drugs guys, and the Neu-influenced production at the back part of the tune is a winking homage to what they’ve been up to for the past few years.”

If you’re coming back to White Denim after a few years away, Side Effects most likely picks up exactly where you left off: a record showcasing a hugely energetic band bursting at the seams. And if you never checked out, then Side Effects is instead a wholly rewarding record – one that celebrates every form of White Denim to date and sets the stage for a brand-new chapter.

White Denim - Side Effects

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Seven albums in and White Denim still know how to rock. Their latest album, Side Effects, comes 11 years into a career that has kept their supercharged and wired guitar sound at the forefront of their music, More in line with the experimental, freewheeling spirit of their fan-favourite record Last Day of Summer than anything else they’ve done since, Side Effects is a record that captures the essence of the band’s full-throttle live shows.

White Denim is an Austin institution, but they’re the rare group to have emerged as a national act while simultaneously gigging around town. Their early efforts landed them a deal with Downtown Records, but after 2016’s Stiff they left the label, built their own studio (Radio Milk), and released two more albums in as many years. 2018’s Performance was their first effort at their own spot, and their first for the label City Slang. Like most White Denim albums this decade, this new iteration of the group revolved around core members James Petralli and Steve Terebecki.

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Performance and the recently released Side Effects are a tandem of sorts, separated by about seven months. In an era when release schedules can so often be determined by everything but the music itself, White Denim have set up an infrastructure in which they dictate how their music enters the world. It’s a strikingly independent move from a rock band, and their story gives hope to artists: Weird, interesting bands can get to a place where they have their own studio named after their own song and still stand with dignity, intact. They’re no longer just an Austin band, but a way forward.

If you’re coming back to White Denim after a few years away, Side Effects most likely picks up exactly where you left off: a record showcasing a hugely energetic band bursting at the seams. And if you never checked out, then Side Effectsis instead a wholly rewarding record – one that celebrates every form of White Denim to date and sets the stage for a brand-new chapter.

Taken from the new album ‘Side Effects

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The ultimate good-time band dish out another rollicking series of blistering bluesy stompers that emphasise their extraordinary tightness as musicians and maintain the white-knuckle energy of their live shows.

Less than a year after their last album Performance, the ever-prolific White Denim are back with their eighth record Side Effects. More in line with the experimental, freewheeling spirit of their fan-favourite record Last Day of Summer than anything else they’ve done since, Side Effects is a record that captures the essence of the band’s full-throttle live shows. Featuring a rotating cast of band members led by James Petralli and Steve Terebecki, these tracks draw on the sounds of different personnel to create a cohesive whole – the result being an album that’s as varied and vivacious as anything they’ve ever done.

If you’re coming back to White Denim after a few years away, Side Effects most likely picks up exactly where you left off: a record showcasing a hugely energetic band bursting at the seams. And if you never checked out, then Side Effects is instead a wholly rewarding record – one that celebrates every form of White Denim to date and sets the stage for a brand-new chapter.

White denim side effects slang50208

One of the most prolific American psychedelic rock and roll bands are back at it on their 7th LP, the City Slang-released Performance. White Denim are an Austin staple and have come to represent the sound of the city over the years through James Petralli’s sleek guitars, Steve Terebecki’s bass groove and Petralli’s seemingly impossible vocal range. The album’s early singles harken back to the band’s finest material, especially “It Might Get Dark,” a bluesy jam with a flawless melody that is just a flat-out fun endeavor for the ears.

The Austin quartet have long pulled hard at the parameters of rock & roll, admitting garage punk, soul, psychedelia, prog, jazz and blues while holding onto its vital goodtime core. Their up-tempo drive has produced a body of work defined as much by stellar musicianship as off-the-chain exhilaration. Energy and adventurism have always been paramount.

Here are nine songs with clarity and renewed purpose as well as a truckload of attitude. A new studio, new collaborators, and new techniques for writing and recording influenced the elastic possibility and liberation felt throughout.
Theirs is music that aims for the whole body, while equally satisfying the mind. While it has morphed, expanded, and even burst apart, White Denim’s sincere, human drive and ability to spark true exhilaration have been unerring constants of the band’s existence. Ever progressing, never content to camp out on a plateau of their creative accomplishments, there is no other band quite like White Denim – unique in talent and legendarily potent as a live band, they are quite simply a very special band.

It’s safe to say when City Slang releases a record everyone listens, with White Denim now the newest Texan contingent filling the ranks of the German label. Following a longplayer this year from Calexico outta Tucson, White Denim bring the sound of Austin to the label by delivering their ninth long player in ten years. Like the artwork of performance, the music is a colourful montage that brings together saxxy jazz, mellow tropicana and distorted garage to psych rock and pop, with melancholic vocals only adding to its unique cross section of colours. A highlight for us is the ’70s Biker rock of “It Might Get Dark” and finger snappin’, vibrato heavy “Moves On”.